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Best European Fiction 2010

by Zadie Smith Aleksandar Hemon

Historically, English-language readers have been great fans of European literature, and names like Franz Kafka, Gustave Flaubert, and Thomas Mann are so familiar we hardly think of them as foreign at all. What those writers brought to English-language literature was a wide variety of new ideas, styles, and ways of seeing the world. Yet times have changed, and how much do we even know about the richly diverse literature being written in Europe today? Best European Fiction 2010 is the inaugural installment of what will become an annual anthology of stories from across Europe. Edited by acclaimed Bosnian novelist and MacArthur Genius-Award winner Aleksandar Hemon, and with dozens of editorial, media, and programming partners in the U.S., UK, and Europe, the Best European Fiction series will be a window onto what s happening right now in literary scenes throughout Europe, where the next Kafka, Flaubert, or Mann is waiting to be discovered. List of contributors Preface: Zadie Smith Introduction: Aleksandar Hemon Ornela Vorpsi (Albania): from The Country Where No One Ever Dies Antonio Fian (Austria): from While Sleeping Peter Terrin (Belgium: Dutch): from "The Murderer" Jean-Philippe Toussaint (Belgium: French): "Zidane's Melancholy" Igor Stiks (Bosnia): "At the Sarajevo Market" Georgi Gospodinov (Bulgaria): "And All Turned Moon" Neven Usumovic (Croatia): "Veres" Naja Marie Aidt (Denmark): "Bulbjerg" Elo Viiding (Estonia): "Foreign Women" Juhani Brander (Finland): from Extinction Christine Montalbetti (France): "Hotel Komaba Eminence" (with Haruki Murakami) George Konr d (Hungary): "Jeremiah's Terrible Tale" Steinar Bragi (Iceland): "The Sky Over Thingvellir" Julian Gough (Ireland: English): "The Orphan and the Mob" Ornan Choile in (Ireland: Irish): "Camino" Giulio Mozzi (AKA Carlo Dalcielo) (Italy): "Carlo Doesn't Know How to Read" Inga Abele (Latvia): "Ants and Bumblebees" Mathias Ospelt (Liechtenstein): "Deep In the Snow" Giedra Radvilaviciute? (Lithuania): "The Allure of the Text" Goce Smilevski (Macedonia): "Fourteen Little Gustavs" Stephan Enter (Netherlands): "Resistance" Jon Fosse (Norway): "Waves of Stone" Michal Witkowski (Poland): "Didi" Valter Hugo M e (Portugal): "dona malva and senhor jos ferreiro" Cosmin Manolache (Romania): "Three Hundred Cups" Victor Pelevin (Russia): "Friedmann Space" David Albahari (Serbia): "The Basilica

Best European Fiction 2010

by Zadie Smith Aleksandar Hemon

Historically, English-language readers have been great fans of European literature, and names like Franz Kafka, Gustave Flaubert, and Thomas Mann are so familiar we hardly think of them as foreign at all. What those writers brought to English-language literature was a wide variety of new ideas, styles, and ways of seeing the world. Yet times have changed, and how much do we even know about the richly diverse literature being written in Europe today? Best European Fiction 2010 is the inaugural installment of what will become an annual anthology of stories from across Europe. Edited by acclaimed Bosnian novelist and MacArthur Genius-Award winner Aleksandar Hemon, and with dozens of editorial, media, and programming partners in the U.S., UK, and Europe, the Best European Fiction series will be a window onto what s happening right now in literary scenes throughout Europe, where the next Kafka, Flaubert, or Mann is waiting to be discovered. List of contributors Preface: Zadie Smith Introduction: Aleksandar Hemon Ornela Vorpsi (Albania): from The Country Where No One Ever Dies Antonio Fian (Austria): from While Sleeping Peter Terrin (Belgium: Dutch): from "The Murderer" Jean-Philippe Toussaint (Belgium: French): "Zidane's Melancholy" Igor Stiks (Bosnia): "At the Sarajevo Market" Georgi Gospodinov (Bulgaria): "And All Turned Moon" Neven Usumovic (Croatia): "Veres" Naja Marie Aidt (Denmark): "Bulbjerg" Elo Viiding (Estonia): "Foreign Women" Juhani Brander (Finland): from Extinction Christine Montalbetti (France): "Hotel Komaba Eminence" (with Haruki Murakami) George Konr d (Hungary): "Jeremiah's Terrible Tale" Steinar Bragi (Iceland): "The Sky Over Thingvellir" Julian Gough (Ireland: English): "The Orphan and the Mob" Ornan Choile in (Ireland: Irish): "Camino" Giulio Mozzi (AKA Carlo Dalcielo) (Italy): "Carlo Doesn't Know How to Read" Inga Abele (Latvia): "Ants and Bumblebees" Mathias Ospelt (Liechtenstein): "Deep In the Snow" Giedra Radvilaviciute? (Lithuania): "The Allure of the Text" Goce Smilevski (Macedonia): "Fourteen Little Gustavs" Stephan Enter (Netherlands): "Resistance" Jon Fosse (Norway): "Waves of Stone" Michal Witkowski (Poland): "Didi" Valter Hugo M e (Portugal): "dona malva and senhor jos ferreiro" Cosmin Manolache (Romania): "Three Hundred Cups" Victor Pelevin (Russia): "Friedmann Space" David Albahari (Serbia): "The Basilica

Best European Fiction 2011

by Colum Mccann Aleksandar Hemon

The launch of Dalkey's Best European Fiction series was nothing short of phenomenal, with wide-ranging coverage in international media such as Time magazine, the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Chicago Tribune, Financial Times, and the Guardian; glowing reviews and interviews in print and online magazines such as the Believer, Bookslut, Paste, and the Huffington Post; radio interviews with editor Aleksandar Hemon on NPR stations in the US and BBC Radio 3 and 4 in the UK; and a terrific response from booksellers, who made Best European Fiction 2010 an "Indie Next" pick and created table displays and special promotions throughout the US and UK. For 2011, Aleksandar Hemon is back as editor, along with a new preface by Colum McCann, and with a whole new cast of authors and stories, including work from countries not included in Best European Fiction 2010.

Best European Fiction 2011

by Colum Mccann Aleksandar Hemon

The launch of Dalkey's Best European Fiction series was nothing short of phenomenal, with wide-ranging coverage in international media such as Time magazine, the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Chicago Tribune, Financial Times, and the Guardian; glowing reviews and interviews in print and online magazines such as the Believer, Bookslut, Paste, and the Huffington Post; radio interviews with editor Aleksandar Hemon on NPR stations in the US and BBC Radio 3 and 4 in the UK; and a terrific response from booksellers, who made Best European Fiction 2010 an "Indie Next" pick and created table displays and special promotions throughout the US and UK. For 2011, Aleksandar Hemon is back as editor, along with a new preface by Colum McCann, and with a whole new cast of authors and stories, including work from countries not included in Best European Fiction 2010.

Best European Fiction 2012

by Nicole Krauss Aleksandar Hemon

Now in its third year, the Best European Fiction series has become a mainstay in the literary landscape, each year featuring new voices from throughout Europe alongside more established names such as Hilary Mantel, Jean-Philippe Toussaint, Ingo Schulze, George Konrad, Victor Pelevin, and Enrique Vila-Matas. For 2012, Aleksandar Hemon introduces a whole new cross-section of European fiction, and there are a few editorial changes as well. For the first time, the preface will be by an American-Nicole Krauss-and the stories, one per country/language, will be arranged within themes (love, art, war, the body), to facilitate book club and reading group discussions.

Best European Fiction 2012

by Nicole Krauss Aleksandar Hemon

Now in its third year, the Best European Fiction series has become a mainstay in the literary landscape, each year featuring new voices from throughout Europe alongside more established names such as Hilary Mantel, Jean-Philippe Toussaint, Ingo Schulze, George Konrad, Victor Pelevin, and Enrique Vila-Matas. For 2012, Aleksandar Hemon introduces a whole new cross-section of European fiction, and there are a few editorial changes as well. For the first time, the preface will be by an American-Nicole Krauss-and the stories, one per country/language, will be arranged within themes (love, art, war, the body), to facilitate book club and reading group discussions.

The Duel

by Constance Garnett Anton Chekhov Aleksandar Hemon

First published in 1891, this morality tale pits a scientist, a government worker, his mistress, a deacon, and a physician against one another in a verbal battle of wits and ethics that explodes into a violent contest: the duel. When Laevsky, a lazy youth who works for the government, tires of his dependent mistress, Nadyezhda Fyodorovna, Von Koren, the scientist, delivers a scathing critique of Loevsky's egotism, forcing the young man to examine his soul. The Duel is a tale of human weakness, the possibility of forgiveness, and a man's ultimate ability to change his ways. It is classic Chekhov, revealing the multifaceted essence of human nature. From the Trade Paperback edition.

The Lazarus Project

by Aleksandar Hemon

On 2 March 1908, Lazarus Averbuch, a young Russian Jewish immigrant to Chicago, tried to deliver a letter to the city's Chief of Police. He was shot dead. After the shooting, it was claimed he was an anarchist assassin and an agent of foreign operatives who wanted to bring the United States to its knees. His sister, Olga, was left alone and bereft in a city seething with tension. A century later, two friends become obsessed with the truth about Lazarus and decide to travel to his birthplace. As the stories intertwine, a world emerges in which everything and nothing has changed . . . 'Prose this powerful could wake the dead' Observer 'This is easily Hemon's best work to date, an intricately tessellated portrait of flight, emigration, and the meaning of home' Evening Standard

Love and Obstacles

by Aleksandar Hemon

A new book of linked stories by the author of the National Book Award finalist The Lazarus Project. Aleksandar Hemon earned his reputation- and his MacArthur "genius grant"-for his short stories, and he returns to the form with a powerful collection of linked stories that stands with The Lazarus Projectas the best work of his celebrated career. A few of the stories have never been published before; the others have appeared in The New Yorker, and several of those have also been included in The Best American Short Stories. All are infused with the dazzling, astonishingly creative prose and the remarkable, haunting autobiographical elements that have distinguished Hemon as one of the most original and illustrious voices of our time. What links the stories in Love and Obstaclesis the narrator, a young man who-like Hemon himself-was raised in Yugoslavia and immigrated to the United States. The stories of Love and Obstaclesare about that coming of age and the complications-the obstacles-of growing up in a Communist but cosmopolitan country, and the disintegration of that country and the consequent uprooting and move to America in young adulthood. But because it's Aleksandar Hemon, the stories extend far beyond the immigrant experience; each one is punctuated with unexpected humor and spins out in fabulist, exhilarating directions, ultimately building to an insightful, often heartbreaking conclusion. Woven together, these stories comprise a book that is, genuinely, as cohesive and powerful as any fiction- achingly human, charming, and inviting.

Nowhere Man: The Pronek Fantasies

by Aleksandar Hemon

In this stylistically adventurous, brilliantly funny tour de force-the most highly acclaimed debut since Nathan Englander's-Aleksander Hemon writes of love and war, Sarajevo and America, with a skill and imagination that are breathtaking.A love affair is experienced in the blink of an eye as the Archduke Ferdinand watches his wife succumb to an assassin's bullet. An exiled writer, working in a sandwich shop in Chicago, adjusts to the absurdities of his life. Love letters from war torn Sarajevo navigate the art of getting from point A to point B without being shot. With a surefooted sense of detail and life-saving humor, Aleksandar Hemon examines the overwhelming events of history and the effect they have on individual lives. These heartrending stories bear the unmistakable mark of an important new international writer.

The Question of Bruno

by Aleksandar Hemon

In this stylistically adventurous, brilliantly funny tour de force -- the most highly acclaimed debut since Nathan Englander's -- Aleksandar Hemon writes of love and war, Sarajevo and America, with a skill and imagination that are breathtaking. A love affair is experienced in the blink of an eye as the Archduke Ferdinand watches his wife succumb to an assassin's bullet. An exiled writer, working in a sandwich shop in Chicago, adjusts to the absurdities of his life. Love letters from war torn Sarajevo navigate the art of getting from point A to point B without being shot. With a surefooted sense of detail and life-saving humor, Aleksandar Hemon examines the overwhelming events of history and the effect they have on individual lives. These heartrending stories bear the unmistakable mark of an important new international writer. Copyright © Libri GmbH. All rights reserved.

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