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Alice Adams

by Booth Tarkington

Over the pictures, the vases, the old brown plush rocking-chairs and the stool, over the three gilt chairs, over the new chintz-covered easy chair and the gray velure sofa--over everything everywhere, was the familiar coating of smoke and grime. <P> <P> Yet here was not fault of housewifery; the curse could not be lifted, as the ingrained smudges permanent on the once white woodwork proved. The grime was perpetually renewed; scrubbing only ground it in. --from the novel This is the story of a middle-class family living in the industrialized "midland country" at the turn of the 20th century. It is against this dingy backdrop that Alice Adams seeks to distinguish herself. She goes to a dance in a used dress, which her mother attempts to renew by changing the lining and adding some lace. She adorns herself not with orchids sent by the florist but with a bouquet of violets she has picked herself. Because her family cannot afford to equip her with the social props or "background" so needed to shine in society, Alice is forced to make do. Ultimately, her ambitions for making a successful marriage must be tempered by the realities of her situation. Alice Adams's resiliency of spirit makes her one of Tarkington's most compelling female characters.

Alice Adams

by Booth Tarkington

The basis for George Stevens's major motion picture starring Katharine Hepburn in her Oscar-nominated leading role.<P><P> In a small Midwestern town in the wake of World War I, Alice Adams delightedly finds herself being pursued by Arthur Russell, a gentleman of a higher social class in life. Desperate to keep her family's lower-middle-class status a secret, she and her parents concoct various schemes to keep their family afloat. Though the realities of her situation eventually reveal themselves and her relationship with Arthur fizzles, Alice's acceptance of this leads her to seek out work to support her family with an admirable resiliency. An enchanting and authentic tale of a family's aspirations to seek more out of life, Alice Adams reveals the strength of the human spirit and its incredible ability to evolve.<P> Originally published in 1921, this bestselling Pulitzer Prize-winning novel was adapted into film twice, and its heroine, the sparkling Alice Adams, still resonates with readers today.<P> With a new foreword by Anne Edwards.

El Cuarto Mandamiento

by Booth Tarkington

Ganadora del Premio Pulitzer en 1918, esta novela narra dos trágicas historias de amor ligadas al declive de una aristocrática dinastía americana: los magníficos Amberson. El protagonista de este drama histórico es George Amberson Minafer, el arrogante heredero de la fortuna familiar, que se verá desafiado por los vertiginosos cambios que trajo consigo la era del automóvil. «El retrato más sincero y despiadado sobre los cambios sociales en el medio oeste americano.» ORSON WELLES Booth Tarkington (1869-1946) nació en Indianápolis, Indiana, en una familia de clase media, y estudió en la Academia Philips y en las universidades de Purdue y Princeton. A lo largo de su carrera recibió dos premios Pulitzer (proeza sólo igualada por Faulkner) y disfrutó de un gran éxito de público. Además de El cuarto mandamiento (1918), la novela que Orson Welles llevó al cine en 1942, escribió The Gentleman from Indiana (1899), Seventeen (1916), Alice Adams (1921) y varias obras de teatro.

The Magnificent Ambersons

by Booth Tarkington

Selected by the Modern Library as one of the 100 best novels of all time<P><P> The Magnificent Ambersons chronicles the changing fortunes of three generations of an American dynasty. The protagonist of Booth Tarkington's great historical drama is George Amberson Minafer, the spoiled and arrogant grandson of the founder of the family's magnificence. Eclipsed by a new breed of developers, financiers, and manufacturers, this pampered scion begins his gradual descent from the midwestern aristocracy to the working class. <P> Today The Magnificent Ambersons is best known through the 1942 Orson Welles movie, but as the critic Stanley Kauffmann noted, "It is high time that [the novel] appear again, to stand outside the force of Welles's genius, confident in its own right."<P> "The Magnificent Ambersons is perhaps Tarkington's best novel," judged Van Wyck Brooks. "[It is] a typical story of an American family and town--the great family that locally ruled the roost and vanished virtually in a day as the town spread and darkened into a city. This novel no doubt was a permanent page in the social history of the United States, so admirably conceived and written was the tale of the Ambersons, their house, their fate and the growth of the community in which they were submerged in the end."<P> Winner of the Pulitzer Prize when it was first published in 1918,

Penrod

by Booth Tarkington

Penrod sat morosely upon the back fence and gazed with envy at Duke, his wistful dog. A bitter soul dominated the various curved and angular surfaces known by a careless world as the face of Penrod Schofield. Except in solitude, that face was almost always cryptic and emotionless; for Penrod had come into his twelfth year wearing an expression carefully trained to be inscrutable. Since the world was sure to misunderstand everything, mere defensive instinct prompted him to give it as little as possible to lay hold upon. Nothing is more impenetrable than the face of a boy who has learned this, and Penrod's was habitually as fathomless as the depth of his hatred this morning for the literary activities of Mrs. Lora Rewbush--an almost universally respected fellow citizen, a lady of charitable and poetic inclinations, and one of his own mother's most intimate friends. Mrs. Lora Rewbush had written something which she called "The Children's Pageant of the Table Round," and it was to be performed in public that very afternoon at the Women's Arts and Guild Hall for the benefit of the Coloured Infants' Betterment Society. And if any flavour of sweetness remained in the nature of Penrod Schofield after the dismal trials of the school-week just past, that problematic, infinitesimal remnant was made pungent acid by the imminence of his destiny to form a prominent feature of the spectacle, and to declaim the loathsome sentiments of a character named upon the programme the Child Sir Lancelot.

Penrod

by Booth Tarkington

Penrod

by Booth Tarkington

A timeless novel in the spirited tradition of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn One of the most popular American authors of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Pulitzer Prize winner Booth Tarkington was acclaimed for his novels set in small Midwestern towns. Penrod tells of a boy growing up in Indianapolis at the turn of the twentieth century. His friends and his dog accompany him on his many jaunts, from the stage as "the Child Sir Lancelot," to the playground, to school. They make names for themselves as "bad boys" who always have the most fun. Nearly a century after it was first published to incredible popularity and acclaim, Penrod remains wildly funny and entertaining to adults and children alike.

Penrod

by Booth Tarkington

Pulitzer Prize-winning author Booth Tarkington, creator of the beloved novels The Magnificent Ambersons and Alice Adams, also created the lovable character of Penrod Schofield, who is at the center of several collections of tales, short stories, and humorous anecdotes. Penrod, the first title in the series, will appeal to fans of Tom Sawyer and other classic children's literature.

Ramsey Milholland

by Booth Tarkington

It all started when he was young -- all the rules and expectations that made him look stupid, and worse than stupid. Like the time Miss Ridgely ordered him to the blackboard, and tried to stimulate him with hints and suggestion -- Miss Ridgely, Ramsey knew, found him mere protoplasm, so far as knowing decimals went -- and so she summoned to the board little Dora Yocum, star of the class, and said, "You stand still, Ramsey. Stay right where you are, and try to learn something from the way Dora does it. " The class giggled, and Ramsey stood, but learned nothing. His conspicuousness was unendurable, because all of his schoolmates naturally found more entertainment in watching him than in following the performance of the capable Dora. And it was like that, month after month . . . and then year after year. But he would make himself good in the eyes of the world. Ramsey knew he would. He "swore" he would. Booth Tarkington (1869-1946), two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize, wrote such keenly observed novels of American life as "Gentle Julia "and "In the Arena. "

Rumbin Galleries

by Booth Tarkington

From the Book Jacket: Booth Tarkington's knowledge of art and the men who deal in it is deep and wide. In this novel, a lively and penetrating revelation of people and art, he uses that knowledge with telling effect. Rumbin, the art-dealer whose ambition is to move his galleries uptown to Fifty-seventh Street, is a vivid and unforgettable creation, with his immense bulk, his unplaceable accent, his encyclopaedic understanding at once of human nature and of the tricks of his trade. To his dusty little shop one day wanders a young man in search of a job. Howard Cattlet's only assets are an "aristocratic dumb face" and a cutaway a classmate's wedding forced him to buy. What Rumbin needs in his business are exactly the cutaway and young Mr. Cattlet's dumb look. With them is Georgina Horne, Mr. Rumbin's gray-eyed secretary, who makes Cattlet feel that art is long but time fleeting when he can't get her to look at him. Their adventures together, now poor, now basking in the temporary riches of a lucky sale, are filled with true Tarkington gaiety. Behind the exciting progress of Rumbin's fortunes lies a romance reminiscent in its grave and touching beauty of the well-remembered romances in his best-loved books

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