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Algerian Chronicles

by Albert Camus

More than 50 years after independence, Algerian Chronicles, with its prescient analysis of the dead end of terrorism, appears here in English for the first time. Published in France in 1958-the year the war caused the collapse of the Fourth French Republic-it is one of Albert Camus' most political works: an exploration of his commitment to Algeria.

American Journals

by Albert Camus Hugh Levick Roger Guilliot

Furnishing tidbits for Camus scholars, providing his take on North and South America, notably New York City and cities of Brazil, along with Buenos Aires and Santiago, Camus seems to have met only a few people he liked, and maybe two or three sites impressed him. He reflects on suicide. No it is not a cheerful work, but it is vivid. For Americans, this work if valuable for he describes our homeland.

Between Hell and Reason: Essays from the Resistance Newspaper, "Combat" 1944-1947

by Albert Camus Alexandre De Gramont

Collected for the first time in English, 41 of Albert Camus's Combat essays trace the evolution of moral and political themes central to his literary works.

Caligula and Three Other Plays

by Albert Camus

'One word to tell the reader what he will not find in this book. Although I have the most passionate attachment for the theater, I have the misfortune of liking only one kind of play, whether comic or tragic.'

Caligula and Three Other Plays

by Albert Camus Stuart Gilbert

'One word to tell the reader what he will not find in this book. Although I have the most passionate attachment for the theater, I have the misfortune of liking only one kind of play, whether comic or tragic.

Exile and the Kingdom

by Albert Camus

These six stories, written at the height of Camus' artistic powers, all depict people at decisive, revelatory moments in their lives. Translated by Justin O'Brien.

Exile and the Kingdom

by Albert Camus Carol Cosman

From a variety of masterfully rendered perspectives, these six stories depict people at painful odds with the world around them. A wife can only surrender to a desert night by betraying her husband. An artist struggles to honor his own aspirations as well as society's expectations of him. A missionary brutally converted to the worship of a tribal fetish is left with but an echo of his identity. Whether set in North Africa, Paris, or Brazil, the stories in Exile and the Kingdom are probing portraits of spiritual exile, and man's perpetual search for an inner kingdom in which to be reborn. They display Camus at the height of his powers. Now, on the 50th anniversary of the book's publication, Carol Gasman's new translation recovers a literary treasure for our time. Albert Camus won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1957.

The Fall

by Albert Camus

Elegantly styled, Camus' profoundly disturbing novel of a Parisian lawyer's confessions is a searing study of modern amorality.

The Fall

by Albert Camus Justin O'Brien

Camus writes about the conscience of modern man in the face of evil, using a man in a shady bar in Amsterdam recalling his past life.

The First Man

by Albert Camus

Camus tells the story of Jacques Cormery, a boy who lived a life much like his own. Camus summons up the sights, sounds and textures of a childhood circumscribed by poverty and a father's death yet redeemed by the austere beauty of Algeria and the boy's attachment to his nearly deaf-mute mother. Published thirty-five years after its discovery amid the wreckage of the car accident that killed Camus,The First Man is the brilliant consummation of the life and work of one of the 20th century's greatest novelists. Translated from the French by David Hapgood.

A Happy Death

by Albert Camus

is it possible to die a happy death? This is the central question of Camus's astonishing early novel, published posthumously and greeted as a major literary event. it tells the story of a young Algerian, Mersault, who defies society's rules by committing a murder and escaping punishment, then experimenting with different ways of life and finally dying a happy man. in many ways A Happy Death is a fascinating first sketch for The Outsider, but it can also be seen as a candid self-portrait, drawing on Camus's memories of his youth, travels and early relationships. it is infused with lyrical descriptions of the sun-drenched Algiers of his childhood - the place where, eventually, Mersault is able to find peace and die 'without anger, without hatred, without regret'.

A Happy Death

by Richard Howard Albert Camus

Camus's first novel, written when he was in his 20s, foreshadows his brilliant work, The Stranger.

Lyrical and Critical Essays

by Albert Camus

'The literary output of Albert Camus was exceptionally concentrated and well organized, so that each part of it throws light on other parts. . . . Here now, for the first time in a complete English translation, we have Camus' three little volumes of essays, plus a selection of his critical comments on literature and on his own place in it. As might be expected, the main interest of these writings is that they illuminate new facets of his usual subject matter. '-John Weightman, The New York Times Book Review.

Lyrical and Critical Essays

by Albert Camus Philip Thody Ellen Conroy Kennedy

A compilation of essays that Camus wrote during the span of his career.

The Myth of Sisyphus

by Albert Camus

The summation of the existentialist philosophy threaded throughout all his writing, Albert Camus' The Myth of Sisyphus is translated by Justin O'Brien with an introduction by James Wood in Penguin Classics. In this profound and moving philosophical statement, Camus poses the fundamental question: is life worth living? If human existence holds no significance, what can keep us from suicide? As Camus argues, if there is no God to give meaning to our lives, humans must take on that purpose themselves. This is our 'absurd' task, like Sisyphus forever rolling his rock up a hill, as the inevitability of death constantly overshadows us. Written during the bleakest days of the Second World War, The Myth of Sisyphus (Le Mythe de Sisyphe) argues for an acceptance of reality that encompasses revolt, passion and, above all, liberty. This volume contains several other essays, including lyrical evocations of the sunlit cities of Algiers and Oran, the settings of his great novels The Outsider and The Plague. Albert Camus (1913-60) is the author of a number of best-selling and highly influential works, all of which are published by Penguin. They include The Fall, The Outsider and The First Man. Awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1957, Camus is remembered as one of the few writers to have shaped the intellectual climate of post-war France, but beyond that, his fame has been international. If you enjoyed The Myth of Sisyphus, you might like Camus' The Outsider, also available in Penguin Modern Classics. 'Camus could never cease to be one of the principal forces in our domain, nor to represent, in his own way, the history of France and of this century'Jean-Paul Sartre

The Myth of Sisyphus and Other Essays

by Albert Camus Justin O'Brien

All of Camus' literary work rests on his essay The Myth of Sisyphus, which analyzes a contemporary intellectual malady, the recognition of the absurdity of human life.

Notebooks 1942-1951

by Albert Camus Justin O'Brien

Insight into the evolution of some of the Nobel Prize winner's famous works is provided through the compilation of quotations and commentaries that reveal the nature of the author's spiritual, intellectual, and moral conflicts.

The Plague

by Albert Camus

Albert Camus' exploration of human reactions to the absurd nature of the universe, and the arbitrary inevitability of death, The Plague, is translated by Robin Buss with an introduction by Tony Judt in Penguin Classics. The townspeople of Oran are in the grip of a deadly plague, which condemns its victims to a swift and horrifying death. Fear, isolation and claustrophobia follow as they are forced into quarantine. Each person responds in their own way to the lethal disease: some resign themselves to fate, some seek blame or revenge, and a few, like the unheroic hero Dr Rieux, resist the terror. An immediate triumph when it was published in 1947, The Plague (La Peste) is in part an allegory of France's suffering under the Nazi occupation, a profound illustration of Camus' existentialist philosophy, and a story of bravery and determination against the precariousness of human existence.

The Plague

by Albert Camus Stuart Gilbert

Set in Algeria, in northern Africa, The Plague is a powerful study of human life and its meaning in the face of a deadly virus that sweeps dispassionately through the city, taking a vast percentage of the population with it.

The Rebel

by Albert Camus

By one of the most profoundly influential thinkers of our century, The Rebel is a classic essay on revolution. For Albert Camus, the urge to revolt is one of the "essential dimensions" of human nature, manifested in man's timeless Promethean struggle against the conditions of his existence, as well as the popular uprisings against established orders throughout history. And yet, with an eye toward the French Revolution and its regicides and deicides, he shows how inevitably the course of revolution leads to tyranny. As old regimes throughout the world collapse, The Rebel resonates as an ardent, eloquent, and supremely rational voice of conscience for our tumultuous times.Translated from the French by Anthony Bower.

The Rebel: An Essay on Man in Revolt

by Albert Camus

By one of the most profoundly influential thinkers of our century, "The Rebel" is a classic essay on revolution. For Albert Camus, the urge to revolt is one of the essential dimensions of human nature, manifested in man's timeless Promethean struggle against the conditions of his existence, as well as the popular uprisings against established orders throughout history. And yet, with an eye toward the French Revolution and its regicides and deicides, he shows how inevitably the course of revolution leads to tyranny. As old regimes throughout the world collapse. "The Rebel" resonates as an ardent, eloquent, and supremely rational voice of conscience for our tumultuous times.

Resistance, Rebellion, and Death

by Albert Camus

In the speech he gave upon accepting the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1957, Albert Camus said that a writer "cannot serve today those who make history; he must serve those who are subject to it." And in these twenty-three political essays, he demonstrates his commitment to history's victims, from the fallen maquis of the French Resistance to the casualties of the Cold War. Resistance, Rebellion, and Death displays Camus's rigorous moral intelligence addressing issues that range from colonial warfare in Algeria to the social cancer of capital punishment. But this stirring book is above all a reflection on the problem of freedom, and, as such, belongs in the same tradition as the works that gave Camus his reputation as the conscience of our century: The Stranger, The Rebel, and The Myth of Sisyphus.

Resistance, Rebellion, and Death

by Albert Camus Justin O'Brien

Resistance, Rebellion, and Death displays Camus's rigorous moral intelligence addressing issues that range from colonial warfare in Algeria to the social cancer of capital punishment. But this stirring book is above all a reflection on the problem of freedom, and, as such, belongs in the same tradition as the works that gave Camus his reputation as the conscience of the 20th century: The Stranger, The Rebel, and The Myth of Sisyphus.

The Stranger

by Albert Camus

Through the story of an ordinary man unwittingly drawn into a senseless murder on an Algerian beach, Camus explored what he termed "the nakedness of man faced with the absurd."

The Stranger

by Albert Camus Stuart Gilbert

An ordinary man lives quietly in Algiers until he commits a pointless murder and is tried, being helplessly carried off by the grip of life itself.

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