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Brothers Karamazov

by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

The Brothers Karamazov is a passionate philosophical novel that enters deeply into the ethical debates of God, free will, and morality. It is a spiritual drama of moral struggles concerning faith, doubt, and reason, set against a modernizing Russia. Dostoyevsky composed much of the novel in Staraya Russa, which is also the main setting of the novel.

The Brothers Karamazov

by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

The violent lives of three sons are exposed when their father is murdered and each one attempts to come to terms with his guilt. Translated and anotated by Larissa Volokhonsky and Richard Pevear

The Brothers Karamazov

by Fyodor Dostoyevsky Constance Garnett

Completed only two months before his death, The Brothers Karamazov is Dostoyevsky's largest, most expanisve, most life-embracing work. Filled with human passions -- lust, greed, love, jealousy, sorrow and humor -- the book is also infused with moral issues and the issue of collective guilt. As in many of Dostoyevsky's novels, the plot centers on a murder. Sucked into the crime's vortex are three brothers: Dmitri, a young officer utterly unrestrained in love, hatred, jealousy, and generosity; Ivan, an intellectual capable of delivering, impromptu, the most brilliant, lively, and unforgettable disquisitions about good and evil, God, and the devil; and Alyosha, the youngest brother, preternaturally patient, good, and loving.Part mystery, part profound philosophical and theological debate, The Brothers Karamazov pulls the reader in on many different levels. As the Introduction says, "The characters Dostoyevsky writes about, though they may not appear to be ones who live on our street, or even on any street, seem, in their passions and lack of self-control, the familiar and intimate denizens of our souls." It's no wonder that for many people The Brothers Karamazov is one of the greatest novels ever written.

Crime and Punishment

by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

One of the world's greatest novels, Crime and Punishment is the story of a murder and its consequences--an unparalleled tale of suspense set in the midst of nineteenth-century Russia's troubled transition to the modern age. In the slums of czarist St. Petersburg lives young Raskolnikov, a sensitive, intellectual student. The poverty he has always known drives him to believe that he is exempt from moral law. But when he puts this belief to the test and commits murder, there results unbearable suffering. Crime and punishment, the novel reminds us, "grow from the same seed."

Crime and Punishment

by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

ENDURING LITERATURE ILLUMINATED BY PRACTICAL SCHOLARSHIP Dostoyevsky's penetrating study of a man for whom the distinction between right and wrong disappears, and a riveting portrait of guilt and retribution. EACH ENRICHED CLASSIC EDITION INCLUDES: A concise introduction that gives readers important background information A chronology of the author's life and work A timeline of significant events that provides the book's historical context An outline of key themes and plot points to help readers form their own interpretations Detailed explanatory notes Critical analysis, including contemporary and modern perspectives on the work Discussion questions to promote lively classroom and book group interaction A list of recommended related books and films to broaden the reader's experience Enriched Classics offer readers affordable editions of great works of literature enhanced by helpful notes and insightful commentary. The scholarship provided in Enriched Classics enables readers to appreciate, understand, and enjoy the world's finest books to their full potential. SERIES EDITED BY CYNTHIA BRANTLEY JOHNSON

Crime and Punishment

by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

Crime and Punishment, by Fyodor Dostoevsky, is part of the Barnes & Noble Classics series, which offers quality editions at affordable prices to the student and the general reader, including new scholarship, thoughtful design, and pages of carefully crafted extras. Here are some of the remarkable features of Barnes & Noble Classics: New introductions commissioned from today's top writers and scholars Biographies of the authors Chronologies of contemporary historical, biographical, and cultural events Footnotes and endnotes Selective discussions of imitations, parodies, poems, books, plays, paintings, operas, statuary, and films inspired by the work Comments by other famous authors Study questions to challenge the reader's viewpoints and expectations Bibliographies for further reading Indices & Glossaries, when appropriate All editions are beautifully designed and are printed to superior specifications; some include illustrations of historical interest. Barnes & Noble Classics pulls together a constellation of influences#151;biographical, historical, and literary#151;to enrich each reader's understanding of these enduring works. Few authors have been as personally familiar with desperation as Fyodor Dostoevsky, and none have been so adept at describing it. Crime and Punishment#151;the novel that heralded the author's period of masterworks#151;tells the story of the poor and talented student Raskolnikov, a character of unparalleled psychological depth and complexity. Raskolnikov reasons that men like himself, by virtue of their intellectual superiority, can and must transcend societal law. To test his theory, he devises the perfect crime#151;the murder of a spiteful pawnbroker living in St. Petersburg. In one of the most gripping crime stories of all time, Raskolnikov soon realizes the folly of his abstractions. Haunted by vivid hallucinations and the torments of his conscience, he seeks relief from his terror and moral isolation#151;first from Sonia, the pious streetwalker who urges him to confess, then in a tense game of cat and mouse with Porfiry, the brilliant magistrate assigned to the murder investigation. A tour de force of suspense, Crime and Punishment delineates the theories and motivations that underlie a bankrupt morality. Priscilla Meyer is Professor of Russian Language and Literature at Wesleyan University, in Middletown, Connecticut. She published Find What the Sailor Has Hidden, the first monograph on Vladimir Nabokov's Pale Fire, and edited the first English translation of Andrei Bitov's collection of short stories, Life in Windy Weather.

Crime and Punishment

by Fyodor Dostoyevsky Constance Garnett

The two years before he wrote Crime and Punishment (1866) had been bad ones for Dostoyevsky. His wife and brother had died; the magazine he and his brother had started, Epoch, collapsed under its load of debt; and he was threatened with debtor's prison. With an advance that he managed to wangle for an unwritten novel, he fled to Wiesbaden, hoping to win enough at the roulette table to get himself out of debt. Instead, he lost all his money; he had to pawn his clothes and beg friends for loans to pay his hotel bill and get back to Russia. One of his begging letters went to a magazine editor, asking for an advance on yet another unwritten novel -- which he described as Crime and Punishment. One of the supreme masterpieces of world literature, Crime and Punishment catapulted Dostoyevsky to the forefront of Russian writers and into the ranks of the world's greatest novelists. Drawing upon experiences from his own prison days, the author recounts in feverish, compelling tones the story of Raskolnikov, an impoverished student tormented by his own nihilism, and the struggle between good and evil. Believing that he is above the law, and convinced that humanitarian ends justify vile means, he brutally murders an old woman -- a pawnbroker whom he regards as "stupid, ailing, greedy...good for nothing." Overwhelmed afterwards by feelings of guilt and terror, Raskolnikov confesses to the crime and goes to prison. There he realizes that happiness and redemption can only be achieved through suffering. Infused with forceful religious, social, and philosophical elements, the novel was an immediate success. This extraordinary, unforgettable work is reprinted here in the authoritative Constance Garnett translation.A selection of the Common Core State Standards Initiative.

Crime and Punishment

by Fyodor Dostoyevsky Constance Garnett

[This text is listed as an example that meets Common Core Standards in English language arts in grades 11-12 at http://www.corestandards.org.]

Crime and Punishment

by Fyodor Dostoyevsky Robin Feuer Miller Sidney Monas Leonard Stanton James D. Hardy

Dostoyevsky's epic masterpiece, unabridged, with an afterword by Robin Feuer MillerOne of the world's greatest novels, Crime and Punishment is the story of a murder and its consequences--an unparalleled tale of suspense set in the midst of nineteenth-century Russia's troubled transition to the modern age. In the slums of czarist St. Petersburg lives young Raskolnikov, a sensitive, intellectual student. The poverty he has always known drives him to believe that he is exempt from moral law. But when he puts this belief to the test, he suffers unbearably. Crime and punishment, the novel reminds us, grow from the same seed. "No other novelist," wrote Irving Howe of Dostoyevsky, "has dramatized so powerfully the values and dangers, the uses and corruptions of systematized thought." And Friedrich Nietzsche called him "the only psychologist I have anything to learn from."With an Introduction by Leonard J. Stanton and James D. Hardy Jr.and an Afterword by Robin Feuer MillerFrom the Paperback edition.

Crime and Punishment

by Fyodor Dostoyevsky Oliver Ready Zohar Lazar

Raskolnikov, a destitute and desperate former student, wanders through the slums of St Petersburg and commits a random murder without remorse or regret. He imagines himself to be a great man, a Napoleon: acting for a higher purpose beyond conventional moral law. But as he embarks on a dangerous game of cat and mouse with a suspicious police investigator, Raskolnikov is pursued by the growing voice of his conscience and finds the noose of his own guilt tightening around his neck. Only Sonya, a downtrodden prostitute, can offer the chance of redemption.This vivid translation by David McDuff has been acclaimed as the most accessible version of Dostoyevsky's great novel, rendering its dialogue with a unique force and naturalism. This edition also includes a new chronology of Dostoyevsky's life and work.

Crime and Punishment

by Fyodor Dostoyevsky Oliver Ready Zohar Lazar

Raskolnikov, a destitute and desperate former student, wanders through the slums of St Petersburg and commits a random murder without remorse or regret. He imagines himself to be a great man, a Napoleon: acting for a higher purpose beyond conventional moral law. But as he embarks on a dangerous game of cat and mouse with a suspicious police investigator, Raskolnikov is pursued by the growing voice of his conscience and finds the noose of his own guilt tightening around his neck. Only Sonya, a downtrodden prostitute, can offer the chance of redemption.This vivid translation by David McDuff has been acclaimed as the most accessible version of Dostoyevsky's great novel, rendering its dialogue with a unique force and naturalism. This edition also includes a new chronology of Dostoyevsky's life and work.

A Disgraceful Affair

by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

A towering literary giant, Fyodor Dostoyevsky was-and remains-unparalleled in his understanding of the darkness that resides in the farthest corners of the human soul. Although his shorter works have been overshadowed by his astonishing novels-Crime and Punishment and The Brothers Karamazov, to name but two-his stories and novellas deserve a place among the great literary inventions of the modern era, offering insight into the themes and ideas that drive his longer fiction. Included in this volume are some of Dostoyevsky's most troubling, moving, and poignant short works. Bonus storyHarper Perennial proudly supports the art of the short story. Included in this classic volume is a bonus story from one of our new writers, Barb Johnson, from her forthcoming collection, More of This World or Maybe Another. Read a short story today.

The Double

by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

While his literary reputation rests mainly on such celebrated novels as Crime and Punishment, The Brothers Karamazov, and The Idiot, Dostoyevsky also wrote much superb short fiction. The Double is one of the finest of his shorter works. It appeared in 1846 (his second published work) and is by far the most significant of his early stories, not least for its successful, straight-faced treatment of a hallucinatory theme.In The Double, the protagonist, Golyadkin senior, is persecuted by his double, Golyadkin junior, who resembles him closely in almost every detail. The latter abuses the former with mounting scorn and brutality as the tale proceeds toward its frightening denouement. Characteristic Dostoyevskyan themes of helplessness, victimization, and scandal are beautifully handled here with an artistry that qualifies the story as a small masterpiece.Students of literature, admirers of Dostoyevsky, and general readers will all be delighted to have this classic work available in this inexpensive, high-quality edition.

The Dream of the Ridiculous Man

by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

The first-rate collection includes "The Dream of a Ridiculous Man," "Bobok," "The Christmas Tree and the Wedding," and five other short masterpieces.

The Eternal Husband

by Fyodor Dostoyevsky Constance Garnett

Fyodor Dostoyevsky (1821-1881), the brilliant Russian novelist whose psychological delvings into the human soul profoundly influenced the twentieth-century novel, wrote a prolific amount of shorter works that are masterpieces in their own right. His novella The Eternal Husband is considered one of the author's most powerful and perfect creations.This surreal tale of duality and interchanging rivalry explores the life of a rich, idle man suddenly forced to confront the husband of his dead mistress. With keen insight into the human condition, the story relates the shared hatred, love, and guilt of the two men. Ripe with the emotional themes central to Dostoyevsky's greatest novels, including morality, the bonds of sexual love, mental torture, and neurosis, The Eternal Husband reveals the full range of the author's captivating genius.

Fyodor Dostoyevsky The Dover Reader

by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

Noted for his sympathetic portrayals of the downtrodden members of nineteenth-century Russian society, Fyodor Dostoyevsky (1821-1881) has exercised immense influence on modern writers. His fiction, rich in philosophical and psychological insights, anticipated the development of psychoanalysis and existentialism. This anthology offers an excellent introduction to Dostoyevsky as well as a portable collection for readers already acquainted with the Russian author's works.Three novellas appear here in their entirety: Poor Folk, The Double, and Notes from the Underground. An excerpt from Crime and Punishment provides a compelling sample of Dostoyevsky's masterwork, and short stories include "Another Man's Wife" and "White Nights."

The Gambler

by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

A compulsive gambler himself at a certain period of his life, Dostoyevsky wrote this novel with real authority. Set in the appropriately named Roulettenburg, a German spa with a casino and an international clientele, it concerns the gambling episodes, tangled love affairs, and complicated lives of Alexey Ivanovitch, a young gambler; Polina Alexandrovna, the woman he loves; a pair of French adventurers, and other characters.Although not as dark as some of Dostoyevsky's other works, The Gambler nevertheless offers a grim and psychologically probing picture of the fatal attractions of gambling. Among its strengths are its well-drawn characters -- Aunt Antonida, although lightly sketched in, is especially delightful -- and its faithful depiction of life among the gambling set in fashionable German watering holes. This edition reprints Constance Garnett's authoritative translation.

The Gambler

by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

The Gambler is a novel by Fyodor Dostoevsky about a young tutor in the employment of a formerly wealthy Russian General. The novella reflects Dostoevsky's own addiction to roulette, which was in more ways than one the inspiration for the book: Dostoevsky completed the novella under a strict deadline so he could pay off gambling debts.

The Grand Inquisitor

by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

Considered to be one of the most crucial passages and subplots to Fyodor Dostoyevsky's novel "The Brothers Karamazov", this story is a parable told by Ivan to his younger brother Alyosha, a novice monk, about the return of Christ during the time of the Spanish Inquisition. When Christ begins performing miracles, he is soon arrested by those of the Inquisition. "The Grand Inquisitor" has influenced many literary and popular culture works as an exemplary philosophical and religious work in its own right and the themes presented in the parable are a driving force for the character development of Ivan and Alyosha throughout the rest of "The Brothers Karamazov".

The Grand Inquisitor

by Fyodor Dostoyevsky Constance Garnett

This new edition presents 'The Grand Inquisitor' together with the preceding chapter, 'Rebellion', and the extended reply offered by Dostoevsky in the following sections, entitles 'The Russian Monk'. By showing how Dostoevsky frames the Grand Inquisitor story in the wider context of the novel, this edition captures the subtlety and power of Dostoevsky's critique of modernity as well as his alternative vision of human fulfillment.

The House of the Dead

by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

Accused of political subversion as a young man, Dostoyevsky was sentenced to four years of hard labor at a Siberian prison camp -- a horrifying experience from which, years later, he developed this semi-autobiographical memoir of a man condemned to penal servitude for murdering his wife. Describing in relentless detail the physical and mental suffering of the convicts, this haunting and remarkable work ranks amoung Dostoyevsky's greatest masterpieces.

The House of the Dead and Poor Folk

by Fyodor Dostoyevsky Constance Garnett

2 novels that reflect the brutal conditions and horrors that Dostoyevsky witnessed while he was in prison in Siberia.

The Idiot

by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

This is one of the most influential works by Dostoyevsky. The story revolves around Prince Lev Nikolayevich Myshkin, who upon his return to Russia finds himself in a very complicated situation.

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