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Aspects of the Novel

by E. M. Forster

Sponsored by Trinity College of the University of Cambridge, The Clark Lectures have a long and distinguished history and have featured remarks by some of England's most important literary minds: Leslie Stephen, T. S. Eliot, F. R. Leavis, William Epsom, and I. A. Richards. All have given celebrated and widely influential talks as featured keynote speakers. An important milestone came in 1927 when, for the first time, a novelist was invited to speak: E.M. Forster had recently published his masterpiece, A Passage to India, and rose to the occasion, delivering eight spirited and penetrating lectures on the novel. The decision to accept the lectureship was a difficult one for Forster. He had deeply ambivalent feelings about the use of criticism. Although suspecting that criticism was somewhat antithetical to creation, and upset by the thought that time spent on the lectures took away from his own work, Forster accepted. His talks were witty and informal, and consisted of sharp penetrating bursts of insight rather than overly-methodical analysis. In short, they were a great success. Gathered and published later as Aspects of the Novel, the ideas articulated in his lectures would gain widespread recognition and currency in twentieth century criticism. Of all of the insights contained within Aspects of the Novel, none has been more influential or widely discussed than Forster's discussion of "flat" and "round" characters. So familiar by now as to seem commonplace, Forster's distinction is meant to categorize the different qualities of characters in literature and examine the purposes to which they are put. Still, it would be wrong to reduce this book to its most famous line of argument and enquiry. Aspects of the Novel also discusses the difference between story and plot, the characteristics of prophetic fiction, and narrative chronology. Throughout, Forster draws on his extensive readings in English, French, and Russian literature, and discusses his ideas in reference to such figures as Joyce, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, James, Sterne, Defoe, and Proust.

Great Novels of E. M. Forster

by E. M. Forster Louis Auchincloss

A renaissance of E. M. Forster is certainly under way. The success of the many films based upon his novels demonstrates Forster's appeal to the modern audience and his aptitude for entertaining a mass quantity of readers over several decades. Four of his best novels are brought together here in one volume:Where Angels Fear to TreadThe Longest JourneyA Room with a ViewHowards End"E. M. Forster's characters are the most lifelike we have had since Jane Austen laid down the pen."-Virgina Woolf"[Forster] does not hesitate to kill off a character right after introducing him with a careful description which leads us to anticipate a larger role."-Louis Auchincloss"The shapeliness of his prose and his plotting still satisfies. The width remains piercing and seamlessly painless."-the New York Times"There is no questioning or resisting the charm of Mr. Forster. The Longest Journey steadily attains beauty."-Saturday Review

Howards End

by E. M. Forster

Howards End

by E. M. Forster

(Book Jacket Status: Not Jacketed) Introduction by Alfred Kazan First published in 1910, Howards End is the novel that earned E. M. Forster recognition as a major writer. At its heart lie two families--the wealthy and business-minded Wilcoxes and the cultured and idealistic Schlegels. When the beautiful and independent Helen Schlegel begins an impetuous affair with the ardent Paul Wilcox, a series of events is sparked--some very funny, some very tragic--that results in a dispute over who will inherit...

Howards End

by E. M. Forster

"Only Connect," Forster's key aphorism, informs this novel about an English country house, Howards End, and its influence on the lives of the wealthy and materialistic Wilcoxes; the cultured, idealistic Schlegel sisters; and the poor bank clerk Leonard Bast. Bringing together people from different classes and nations by way of sympathetic insight and understanding, Howards End eloquently addresses the question "Who shall inherit England?" (Lionel Trilling).From the Trade Paperback edition.

Howards End

by E. M. Forster

Howards End depicts the life and manners of the upper middle class that Forster knew from his own life. He portrayed the shortcomings as well as the amenities of society along side the frequent trivialities he saw. He felt that people need not be static even when a society was. A sincere individual could still achieve a morality above what his surroundings might seem to permit. In Howards End, Forster is "preoccupied with the well-being of an entire society. He not only analyzed the various strata of the British upper class, he also showed that even a sincere individual would encounter great difficulty in acquiring wholeness in the fractured modern age. " Please Note: This book has been reformatted to be easy to read in true text, not scanned images that can sometimes be difficult to decipher. The Microsoft eBook has a contents page linked to the chapter headings for easy navigation. The Adobe eBook has bookmarks at chapter headings and is printable up to two full copies per year. Both versionsare text searchable.

Howards End

by E. M. Forster Regina Marler Benjamin Demott

A 20th-century classic on British society's class warfare, as seen through the eyes of three different castes. Howards End, a house in the Herefordshire countryside, is the source of conflict between these parties-and ultimately a symbol of class conflict in England.

The Longest Journey

by E. M. Forster

In this searching tragicomedy of manners, personalities, and world views, E. M. Forster explores the "idea of England" he would later develop in Howard's End. Bookish, sensitive, and given to wild enthusiasms, Rickie Elliot is virtually made for a life at Cambridge, where he can subsist on a regimen of biscuits and philosophical debate. But the love-smitten Rickie leaves his natural habitat to marry the devastatingly practical Agnes Pembroke, who brings with her -- as a sort of dowry -- a teaching position at the abominable Sawston School.From the Trade Paperback edition.

Maurice

by E. M. Forster

Novel written in 1913 that describes the long and difficult process by which a typical product of middle-class suburbia realizes that he is a homosexual.

A Passage to India

by E. M. Forster

E. M. Forster's exquisitely observed novel about the clash of cultures and the consequences of perception, set in colonial India. Among the greatest novels of the twentieth century and the basis for director David Lean's Academy Award-winning film,A Passage to India unravels the growing racial tension between Indians, uneasy at best with colonial power, and the British, largely ignorant and dismissive of the society they're infiltrating. A sudden moment of confusion results in a devastating series of events that threatens to ruin a man's life, revealing just how deeply--and swiftly--prejudice has taken root.

A Room with a View

by E. M. Forster

One of English literature's most inspiring love storiesLucy Honeychurch is a young woman torn between the opposing values of gray old England and vibrant Italy in this unforgettable story of romance and rebellion. On a trip to Florence with her older cousin and chaperone, Lucy becomes enchanted by a freedom unlike any she has known at home. The excitement she feels when she is with George Emerson, a fellow boarder at the Pension Bertolini, is as exhilarating as it is confusing, and their intoxicating kiss in a field of violets threatens to turn her whole world upside down. Back at Windy Corner, her family's Surrey estate, Lucy must finally decide if the power of passion is greater than the force of expectation.Widely recognized as one of the finest novels of the twentieth century, A Room with a View is E. M. Forster's most hopeful work and a truly timeless romance.This ebook has been professionally proofread to ensure accuracy and readability on all devices.

A Room With a View

by E. M. Forster

A charming young Englishwoman, Lucy Honeychurch, faints into the arms of a fellow Britisher when she witnesses a murder in a Florentine piazza. Attracted to this man, George Emerson--who is entirely unsuitable and whose father just may be a Socialist--Lucy is soon at war with the snobbery of her class and her own conflicting desires. Back in England, she is courted by a more acceptable, if stifling, suitor and soon realizes she must make a startling decision that will determine the course of her future: she is forced to choose between convention and passion.The enduring delight of this tale of romantic intrigue is rooted in Forster's colorful characters, including outrageous spinsters, pompous clergymen, and outspoken patriots. Written in 1908, A Room with a View is one of E. M. Forster's earliest and most celebrated works.

A Room with a View

by E. M. Forster David Leavitt

In this brilliant piece of social comedy, E. M. Forster is concerned with one of his favorite themes: the "undeveloped heart" of the English middle classes, who are here represented by a group of tourists and expatriates in Florence. The English abroad are observed with a sharply ironic eye, but one of them, the young and unaffected Lucy Honeychurch, is also drawn with great sympathy. In her relationships with the unconventional Emersons and with her supercilious fiancé, Lucy is torn between lingering social and sexual Victorian proprieties and the spontaneous promptings of her own undeveloped heart.

A Room with a View

by E. M. Forster Coco Rousseau

His fingers hungered. George's heart pounded within the confines of his chest. The young woman bedazzled him like no other. Her beauty allured him, compelled him to act upon impulse. He wanted her. The touch of her soft lips against his, to feel her, to know her quiet sighs. When Lucy left the dinner table with no explanation, it was all too clear . . .E. M. Forster's classic tale of a young woman and man in the early twentieth century who must reject convention to find love lacks only the intimate love scenes to make the story a true classic. Coco Rousseau brings to life what it's like for this young couple to share their first kiss and what passion might arise from that initial spark. The reader is captured from their opening glance, led through scenes of spontaneous desire, separation, and finally, to that moment Lucy must decide whether to surrender herself completely to George.Experience a love story born in the romantic hillsides of Tuscany as never before told in this timeless classic and discover whether Lucy can set convention aside to follow her heart.Sensuality Level: Sensual

A Room with a View and Howard's End

by E. M. Forster

'To me,' D. H. Lawerence once wrote to E. M. forster, 'you are the last Englishman.' Indeed, Forster's novels offer contemporary readers clear, vibrant portraits of life in Edwardian England. Published in 1908 to both critical and popular acclaim, A Room with a View is a whimsical comedy of manners that owes more to Jane Austen that perhaps any other of his works. The central character is a muddled young girl named Lucy Honeychurch, who runs away from the man who stirs her emotions, remaining engaged to a rich snob. Forster considered it his 'nicest' novel, and today it remains probably his most well liked. Its moral is utterly simple. Throw away your etiquette book and listen to your heart. But it was Forster's next book, Howards End, a story about who would inhabit a charming old country house (and who, in a larger sense, would inherit England), that earned him recognition as a major writer. Centered around the conflict between the wealthy, materialistic Wilcox family and the cultured, idealistic Schlegel sisters-and informed by Forester's famous dictum 'Only connect'-it is full of tenderness towards favorite characters. 'Howards End is a classic English novel . . . superb and wholly cherishable . . . one that admirers have no trouble reading over and over again,' said Alfred Kazin.

Showing 1 through 18 of 18 results

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