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All Rivers Run to the Sea: Memoirs

by Elie Wiesel

From his early years with his loving Jewish family to the horrors of Auschwitz to his life as a Nobel Prize-winning novelist, Elie Wiesel tells his story. Passionate and poignant, All Rivers Run to the Sea is an unforgettable book of love and rage, doubt and faith, despair and trust, and ultimately, of wisdom. of photos.

A Beggar in Jerusalem

by Elie Wiesel

When the Six-Day War began, Elie Wiesel rushed to Israel. "I went to Jerusalem because I had to go somewhere, I had to leave the present and bring it back to the past. You see, the man who came to Jerusalem then came as a beggar, a madman, not believing his eyes and ears, and above all, his memory."This haunting novel takes place in the days following the Six-Day War. A Holocaust survivor visits the newly reunited city of Jerusalem. At the Western Wall he encounters the beggars and madmen who congregate there every evening, and who force him to confront the ghosts of his past and his ties to the present. Weaving together myth and mystery, parable and paradox, Wiesel bids the reader to join him on a spiritual journey back and forth in time, always returning to Jerusalem.

A Beggar in Jerusalem

by Elie Wiesel Lily Edelman

The prize-winning novel of a man haunted by love and war, and obsessed by a dream of life

Conversations with Elie Wiesel

by Elie Wiesel Richard D. Heffner

Heffner (communications and public policy, Rutgers U. ) conducted some two dozen interviews with Elie Wiesel for his public television productions "The Open Mind" and "Dialogues: A Series of Conversations on the Crucial Issues of Our Times. " These, in addition to a few conducted solely for this volume, were distilled to form the 11 chapters of this book, in which Nobel Peace Prize-winner Wiesel reflects on the moral responsibility of governments and individuals; the role of the state in our lives; the rise of nationalism; religion, politics, and tolerance; capital punishment; mercy killing; and the role of memory. Annotation c. Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

Dawn

by Elie Wiesel Frances Frenaye

Two men wait through the night in British-controlled Palestine for dawn--and for death. One is a captured English officer. The other is Elisha, a young Israeli freedom fighter whose assignment is to kill the officer in reprisal for Britain's execution of a Jewish prisoner. Elisha's past is the nightmare memory of Nazi death camps. He is the only surviving member of his family. His future is a cherished dream of life in the promised homeland. But at daybreak his present will become the tortured reality of a principled man ordered to commit cold-blooded murder. Resonant with feeling, DAWN is an unforgettable journey into the human heart--and an eloquent statement about the moral basis of the new Israel.

Day

by Elie Wiesel Anne Borchardt

"Not since Albert Camus has there been such an eloquent spokesman for man. The publication of Day restores Elie Wiesel's original title to the novel initially published in English as The Accident and clearly establishes it as the powerful conclusion to the author's classic trilogy of Holocaust literature, which includes his memoir Night and novel Dawn. In Night it is the 'I' who speaks. In the other two, it is the 'I' who listens and questions. In its opening paragraphs, a successful journalist and Holocaust survivor steps off a New York City curb and into the path of an oncoming taxi. Consequently, most of Wiesel's masterful portrayal of one man's exploration of the historical tragedy that befell him, his family, and his people transpires in the thoughts, daydreams, and memories of the novel's narrator. Torn between choosing life or death, Day again and again returns to the guiding questions that inform Wiesel's trilogy: the meaning and worth of surviving the annihilation of a race, the effects of the Holocaust upon the modern character of the Jewish people, and the loss of one's religious faith in the face of mass murder and human extermination.

The Fifth Son

by Elie Wiesel

When a Holocaust survivor's son discovers that his brooding father has been haunted for years by his role in the murder of a brutal SS officer just after the war, the son also discovers that the Nazi is still alive. What begins as a quest for his fathers love becomes a re-enactment of the past as the son sets out to complete his father's act of revenge.

The Fifth Son

by Elie Wiesel Marion Wiesel

A Holocaust survivor's son discovers that his father is haunted by his role in the murder of a brutal SS officer. But the son also finds out that the officer is still alive. The son sets out to complete his father's act of revenge.

The Forgotten

by Elie Wiesel

A profoundly moving novel about a Holocaust survivor's struggle to remember both the heroic and the shameful events of his past, and about his American-born son's need to assimilate his father's life into his own. "A book of shattering force that offers a message of urgency to a world under the spell of trivia and the tyranny of amnesia."--Chicago Tribune Book World.From the Trade Paperback edition.

The Forgotten

by Elie Wiesel Stephen Becker

The novel centers on a psychotherapist Holocaust survivor who is losing his memory to an incurable disease. He resolves to tell his son about his past before it is too late, compelling his son to visit the Romanian village where the crime that haunts his father was committed.

Four Hasidic Masters and Their Struggle Against Melancholy

by Elie Wiesel Theodore M. Hesburgh

Friendship and concern revolves around Hasidism that is against solitude. The concept is to live, share happiness and distress with others.

From the Kingdom of Memory

by Elie Wiesel

"One of the great writers of our generation" (The New Republic) weaves together memories of his life before the Holocaust and his great struggle to find meaning afterwards. Included are Wiesel's landmark speeches, among them his powerful testimony at the trial of Klaus Barbie and his 1986 Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech.From the Trade Paperback edition.

From the Kingdom of Memory: Reminiscences

by Elie Wiesel

Wiesel weaves together memories of his life before the Holocaust and his struggle to find meaning afterwards. His powerful testimony at the trial of Klaus Barbie and his 1986 Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech are included here.

The Golem: The Story of a Legend

by Elie Wiesel Anne Borchardt

For centuries, Jews have remembered the Golem, a creature of clay said to have been given life by the mystical incantations of the mysterious Maharal, Rabbi Yehuda Loew, leader of the Jewish community of 16th-century Prague. Some versions have the Golem as a lovable, clumsy mute; others as a monster like Frankenstein's who turned against his creator, giving a vivid warning against magic and the occult. In this beautiful book, Elie Wiesel has collected many of the legends associated with this enigmatic and elusive figure and retold them as seen through the eyes of a wizened gravedigger who claims to have witnessed as a child the numerous miracles that legend attributes to the Golem. "I, Reuven, son of Yaakov," he begins, "declare under oath that 'Yossel the mute,' the 'Golem made of clay,' deserves to be remembered by our people, our persecuted and assassinated, and yet immortal people, We owe it to him to evoke his fate with love and gratitude ... He was a savior, I tell you." Reuven's Golem is no fool or monster, but a figure of intuition, intelligence, and compassion who may yet return, perhaps in our own generation, to protect the Jews from their enemies.

Hostage

by Elie Wiesel

From Elie Wiesel, Nobel laureate and author of Night, a charged, deeply moving novel about the legacy of the Holocaust in today's troubled world and the ongoing Israeli-Palestinian conflict. It's 1975, and Shaltiel Feigenberg--professional storyteller, writer and beloved husband--has been taken hostage: abducted from his home in Brooklyn, blindfolded and tied to a chair in a dark basement. His captors, an Arab and an Italian, don't explain why the innocent Shaltiel has been chosen, just that his life will be bartered for the freedom of three Palestinian prisoners. As his days of waiting commence, Shaltiel resorts to what he does best, telling stories--to himself and to the men who hold his fate in their hands. With beauty and sensitivity, Wiesel builds the world of Shaltiel's memories, haunted by the Holocaust and a Europe in the midst of radical change. A Communist brother, a childhood spent hiding from the Nazis in a cellar, the kindness of liberating Russian soldiers, the unrest of the 1960s--these are the stories that unfold in Shaltiel's captivity, as the outside world breathlessly follows his disappearance and the police move toward a final confrontation with his captors. Impassioned, provocative and insistently humane, Hostage is both a masterly thriller and a profoundly wise meditation on the power of memory to connect us to the past and our shared need for resolution.

The Jews of Silence

by Elie Wiesel

In the fall of 1965 the Israeli newspaper Haaretz sent a young journalist named Elie Wiesel to the Soviet Union to report on the lives of Jews trapped behind the Iron Curtain. "I would approach Jews who had never been placed in the Soviet show window by Soviet authorities," wrote Wiesel. "They alone, in their anonymity, could describe the conditions under which they live; they alone could tell whether the reports I had heard were true or false--and whether their children and their grandchildren, despite everything, still wish to remain Jews. From them I would learn what we must do to help . . . or if they want our help at all." What he discovered astonished him: Jewish men and women, young and old, in Moscow, Kiev, Leningrad, Vilna, Minsk, and Tbilisi, completely cut off from the outside world, overcoming their fear of the ever-present KGB to ask Wiesel about the lives of Jews in America, in Western Europe, and, most of all, in Israel. They have scant knowledge of Jewish history or current events; they celebrate Jewish holidays at considerable risk and with only the vaguest ideas of what these days commemorate. "Most of them come [to synagogue] not to pray," Wiesel writes, "but out of a desire to identify with the Jewish people--about whom they know next to nothing." Wiesel promises to bring the stories of these people to the outside world. And in the home of one dissident, he is given a gift--a Russian-language translation of Night, published illegally by the underground. "'My God,' I thought, 'this man risked arrest and prison just to make my writing available to people here!' I embraced him with tears in my eyes."From the Trade Paperback edition.

The Judges

by Elie Wiesel

From Elie Wiesel, a gripping novel of guilt, innocence, and the perilousness of judging both. A plane en route from New York to Tel Aviv is forced down by bad weather. A nearby house provides refuge for five of its passengers: Claudia, who has left her husband and found new love; Razziel, a religious teacher who was once a political prisoner; Yoav, a terminally ill Israeli commando; George, an archivist who is hiding a Holocaust secret that could bring down a certain politician; and Bruce, a would-be priest turned philanderer. Their host--an enigmatic and disquieting man who calls himself simply the Judge--begins to interrogate them, forcing them to face the truth and meaning of their lives. Soon he announces that one of them--the least worthy--will die.The Judges is a powerful novel that reflects the philosophical, religious, and moral questions that are at the heart of Elie Wiesel's work. From the Hardcover edition.

King Solomon and His Magic Ring

by Elie Wiesel

So begins Elie Wiesel's harmonious retelling of twenty mysterious and wonderfully compelling stories about King Solomon--rarely heard tales that span the revered ruler's life, from the time he took the throne at age twelve, to the building of the Temple in Jerusalem, to the disintegration of the kingdom upon his death.

Legends of Our Time

by Elie Wiesel

A collection of tales immortalizing the heroic deeds and visions of people Wiesel knew during and after World War II.From the Trade Paperback edition.

A Mad Desire to Dance

by Elie Wiesel

From Elie Wiesel, a recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize and one of our fiercest moral voices, a provocative and deeply thoughtful new novel about a life shaped by the worst horrors of the twentieth century and one man's attempt to reclaim happiness.Doriel, a European expatriate living in New York, suffers from a profound sense of desperation and loss. His mother, a member of the Resistance, survived World War II only to die in an accident, together with his father, soon after. Doriel was a child during the war, and his knowledge of the Holocaust is largely limited to what he finds in movies, newsreels, and books--but it is enough. Doriel's parents and their secrets haunt him, leaving him filled with longing but unable to experience the most basic joys in life. He plunges into an intense study of Judaism, but instead of finding solace, he comes to believe that he is possessed by a dybbuk.Surrounded by ghosts, spurred on by demons, Doriel finally turns to Dr. Thérèse Goldschmidt, a psychoanalyst who finds herself particularly intrigued by her patient. The two enter into an uneasy relationship based on exchange: of dreams, histories, and secrets. Despite Doriel's initial resistance, Dr. Goldschmidt helps to bring him to a crossroads--and to a shocking denouement.In Doriel's journey into the darkest regions of the soul, Elie Wiesel has written one of his most profoundly moving works of fiction, grounded always by his unparalleled moral compass.From the Hardcover edition.

Messengers of God

by Elie Wiesel

Elie Wiesel's classic look at Job and seven other Biblical characters as they grapple with their relationship with God and the question of his justice.Wiesel has never allowed himself to be diverted from the role of witness for the martyred Jews and survivors of the Holocaust, and by extension for all those who through the centuries have asked Job's question: "What is God doing and where is His justice?" Here in a masterful series of mythic portraits, drawing upon Bible tales and the Midrashim (a body of commentary), Wiesel explores "the distant and haunting figures that molded him": Adam, Cain and Abel, Abraham and Isaac, Jacob, Joseph, and Job. With the dramatic invention of a Father Mapple and the exquisite care of a Talmudic scholar, Wiesel interprets the wellsprings of Jewish religious tradition as the many faces of man's greatness facing the inexplicable. In an intimate relationship with God it is possible to complain, to demand. Adam and Eve in sinning "cried out" against the injustice of their entrapment; Cain assaulted God rather than his brother; and Abraham's agreement to sacrifice his son placed the burden of guilt on Him who demanded it. As for Job, Wiesel concludes that he abdicated his defiance as did the confessing Communists of Stalin's time to "underline the implausibility" of his trial, and thus become the accuser. Wiesel's concern with the imponderables of fate seems to move from strength to strength. --Kirkus Reviews

Night

by Elie Wiesel Stella Rodway

When Elie Wiesel was liberated from Buchenwald in 1945, having also been in Birkenau, Auschwitz, and Buna, he imposed a ten-year vow of silence upon himself before trying to describe what had happened to him and over six million other Jews. When he finally broke that silence, he had trouble finding a publisher. Such depressing subject matter. When Night was finally published, over twenty-five years ago, few people wanted to read about the Holocaust. Such depressing subject matter. But we cannot indefinitely avoid depressing subject matter, particularly if it is true, and in the subsequent quarter century the world has had to hear a story it would have preferred not to hear-the story of how a cultured people turned to genocide, and how the rest of the world, also composed of cultured people, remained silent in the face of genocide.

Night

by Elie Wiesel Marion Wiesel

A new translation of Wiesel's landmark book Night, and the text of his 1986 Nobel Peace Prize Acceptance Speech.

Night, with Connections

by Elie Wiesel

Wiesel's account of his survival as a teenager in the Nazi death camps, including a new preface is which he reflects on the enduring importance of Night and his lifelong, passionate dedication to ensuring that the world never forgets man's capacity for inhumanity to man.

The Oath

by Elie Wiesel

When a Christian boy disappears in a fictional Eastern European town in the 1920s, the local Jews are quickly accused of ritual murder. There is tension in the air and a pogrom threatens to erupt. Suddenly, an extraordinary man--Moshe the dreamer, a madman and mystic--steps forward and confesses to a crime he did not commit, in a vain attempt to save his people from certain death. The community gathers to hear his last words--a plea for silence--and everyone present takes an oath: whoever survives the impending tragedy must never speak of the town's last days and nights of terror.For fifty years the sole survivor keeps his oath--until he meets a man whose life depends on hearing the story, and one man's loyalty to the dead confronts head-on another's reason to go on living.One of Wiesel's strongest early novels, this timeless parable about the Jews and their enemies, about hate, family, friendship, and silence, is as powerful, haunting, and significant as it was when first published in 1973.

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