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Just a Few Words, Mr. Lincoln

by Jean Fritz

An easy-to-read story about Lincoln and the famous words he spoke at Gettysburg that will make young readers feel like they are actually at Gettysburg witnessing the speech that still lives in the hearts of all Americans.

Leonardo's Horse

by Jean Fritz

Fritz (And Then What Happened, Paul Revere?) again calls upon her informal yet informative style to spotlight a scintillating sliver of history, recounted in two related tales. Her narrative opens as the ultimate Renaissance man, Leonardo da Vinci, earns a commission from the duke of Milan to create a sculpture to honor the duke's father a bronze horse three times larger than life. Though this creative genius spent years on the project, he died without realizing his dream and, writes Fritz, "It was said that even on his deathbed, Leonardo wept for his horse." The author then fast-forwards to 1977: an American named Charles Dent vows to create the sculpture and make it a gift from the American people to the residents of Italy. How his goal was accomplished (alas, posthumously) makes for an intriguing tale that Fritz deftly relays. Talbott's (Forging Freedom) diverse multimedia artwork includes reproductions of da Vinci's notebooks, panoramas revealing the Renaissance in lavish detail and majestic renderings of the final equine sculpture. Talbott makes creative use of the book's format a rectangle topped by a semi-circle: the rounded space by turns becomes a window through which da Vinci views a cloud shaped like a flying horse; the domed building that was Dent's studio and gallery; and a globe depicting the route the bronze horse travels on its way from the U.S. to Italy. An inventive introduction to the Renaissance and one of its masters.

The Lost Colony of Roanoke

by Jean Fritz

The Lost Colony of Roanoke is one of the most puzzling mysteries in America's history. In 1587, 115 colonists sailed to the new world, eager to build the brand new Cittie of Raleigh, only to disappear practically without a trace. Where did they go? What could have possibly happened?Who better to collect and share the clues than Jean Fritz and Hudson Talbott? The creators of Leonardo's Horse, an American Library Association Notable Book, again combine their masterful talents to illuminate a tragic piece of history that still fascinates Americans today.

Make Way for Sam Houston

by Jean Fritz

The story of Sam Houston for children

Shh! We're Writing the Constitution

by Jean Fritz

From the back cover In the sweltering summer of 1787, fifty-five delegates from thirteen states huddled in the strictest secrecy in the Philadelphia State House to draw up a plan of government for the collection of states, and after four months of emotional outbursts and rousing debates, our Constitution was written. "Assembling attention-grabbing tidbits that illuminate personalities (Franklin observed that if the President's term wasn't limited there'd be no way to get rid of him short of shooting him), re-create conditions in the 18th century (delegates sweltered as windows were shut to keep out noise and flies), and give an excellent feel for the kind of horse-trading that was required before an acceptable document was produced (it took 60 ballots just to settle on the Electoral College). . . . Lively and fascinating, this will be a delightful surprise to any child. ... It is sure to open minds to the interest and relevance of history."

Surprising Myself

by Jean Fritz

Autobiography of the children's author who travels all over the world and has written stories of things she sees.

Traitor: The Case of Benedict Arnold

by Jean Fritz

A School Library Journal Best Book of the Year, An ALA Notable Book for Children, and A Horn Nonfiction Honor Book. All he wanted was to be a hero. And to have money and the best clothes. And to be promoted to a ranking major general. Simple, normal ambitions. Not for Benedict Arnold. The trouble with him was that he carried everything too far. Where did it lead? To treason. An Accelerated Reader® Title

Traitor: The Case of Benedict Arnold

by Jean Fritz

Benedict Arnold always carried things too far. As a boy he did crazy things like climbing atop a burning roof and picking a fight with the town constable. As a soldier, he was even more reckless. He was obsessed with being the leader and the hero in every battle, and he never wanted to surrender. He even killed his own horse once rather than give it to the enemy. Where did the extremism lead Arnold? To treason. America's most notorious traitor is brought to life as Jean Fritz relays the engrossing story of Benedict Arnold -- a man whose pride, ambition, and self-righteousness drove him to commit the heinous crime of treason against the United States during the American Revolution. "A highly entertaining biography illuminating the personality of a complex man. " -Horn Book "A gripping story. . . As compelling as a thriller, the book also shines as history. " -Publishers Weekly An ALA Notable Book A New York Times Book Review Notable Book of the Year A School Library Journal Best Book of the Year An ABA Pick of the Lists A Horn Book Fanfare Title .

What's the Big Idea, Ben Franklin?

by Jean Fritz

A brief biography of the eighteenth-century printer, inventor, and statesman who played an influential role in the early history of the United States. Copyright © Libri GmbH. All rights reserved.

Where Do You Think You're Going, Christopher Columbus?

by Jean Fritz

Discusses the voyages of Christopher Columbus who was determined to beat everyone in the race to the Indies.

Where Was Patrick Henry on the 29th of May?

by Jean Fritz

Where was Patrick Henry on the 29th of May? Languishing on a sack of salt in his country store? On the floor of the House of Burgesses speaking against England's stamp tax? In the green Virginia woods fishing and imitating birdsongs? At the royal governor's palace being elected governor? The truth is that all his life as planter, lawyer, statesman, things seemed to happen to Patrick Henry on the 29th of May. And no matter where he was he might be orating. Patrick Henry had a good ear (he even taught himself to play the flute when he was stuck indoors with a broken collar bone) and what people called a "sending voice." What he cared most for was his native Virginia and her freedom. Jean Fritz' keen eye for humorous and humanizing detail, her insight into the Revolution, and her unconventional approach make for a revealing and colorful portrait of Patrick Henry --from practical joker to passionate Virginian.

Who's Saying What in Jamestown, Thomas Savage?

by Jean Fritz

Thomas Savage was just thirteen when he sailed to the New World and was sent to live with Powhatan to learn the Algonquian language and be an interpreter between the Indians and the colonists. Pocahantas was a friendly teacher, and soon he was relaying messages. But as the tensions grew between the groups, Thomas's job became difficult no matter how hard he tried not to take sides. Throughout the violent history of Jamestown, Thomas's position provided a unique view of early America, now illuminated through the incomparable lens of Jean Fritz.

Who's That Stepping on Plymouth Rock?

by Jean Fritz

Using her trademark humorous style, Jean Fritz tells the story of Plymouth Rock--the granite boulder upon which it was decided the Pilgrims must have set foot upon their arrival in the New World--telling how it came to be the impressive monument it is today.

Why Don't You Get a Horse, Sam Adams?

by Jean Fritz

In the early days of America when men wore ruffles, rode horseback, and obeyed the King, there lived a man in Boston who cared for none of these things. No one expected Samuel Adams to wear ruffles or pledge allegiance to the King of England, but his friends did think that he might get on a horse. But would he? Never! he said. An ALA Notable Children's Book. Full color. Copyright © Libri GmbH. All rights reserved.

Why Not, Lafayette?

by Jean Fritz

Traces the life of the French nobleman who fought for democracy in revolutions in both the United States and France.

Will You Sign Here, John Hancock?

by Jean Fritz

This book is a third person account of the childhood, adolescence and adulthood of the first signer of the Declaration of Independance. The book describes his complete self centerdness as a young adult and how that led to his rather prominant signature on the historic document.

The World in 1492

by Jean Fritz Katherine Paterson Patricia C. Mckissack Fredrick L. Mckissack Margaret Mahy Jamake Highwater

Introduces the history, customs, beliefs, and accomplishments of people living in Europe, Asia, Africa, Australia and Oceania, and the Americas during the fifteenth century.

You Want Women To Vote, Lizzie Stanton?

by Jean Fritz

With her trademark humor and anecdotal style, the Newbery Honor Award-winner and preeminent biographer for young people turns her attention to Elizabeth Cady Stanton, the lively, unconventional spokeswoman of the woman suffrage movement. Convinced from an early age that women should have the same rights as men, Lizzie embarked on a career that changed America.

You Want Women to Vote, Lizzie Stanton?

by Jean Fritz

Who says women shouldn't speak in public? And why can't they vote? These are questions Elizabeth Cady Stanton grew up asking herself. Her father believed that girls didn't count as much as boys, and her own husband once got so embarrassed when she spoke at a convention that he left town. Luckily Lizzie wasn't one to let society stop her from fighting for equality for everyone. And though she didn't live long enough to see women get to vote, our entire country benefited from her fight for women's rights. "Fritz?imparts not just a sense of Stanton's accomplishments but a picture of the greater society Stanton strove to change?. Highly entertaining and enlightening. " - Publishers Weekly (starred review) "This objective depiction of AStanton's? life and times?makes readers feel invested in her struggle. " - School Library Journal (starred review) "An accessible, fascinating portrait. " - The Horn Book .

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