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Cultural Mobility: A Manifesto

by Stephen Greenblatt Ines G. Zupanov Reinhard Meyer-Kalkus Heike Paul Pal Nyiri Friederike Pannewick

Cultural Mobility is a blueprint and a model for understanding the patterns of meaning that human societies create. Drawn from a wide range of disciplines, the essays collected here under the distinguished editorial guidance of Stephen Greenblatt share the conviction that cultures, even traditional cultures, are rarely stable or fixed. Radical mobility is not a phenomenon of the twenty-first century alone, but is a key constituent element of human life in virtually all periods. Yet academic accounts of culture tend to operate on exactly the opposite assumption and to celebrate what they imagine to be rooted or whole or undamaged. To grasp the shaping power of colonization, exile, emigration, wandering, contamination, and unexpected, random events, along with the fierce compulsions of greed, longing, and restlessness, cultural analysis needs to operate with a new set of principles. An international group of authors spells out these principles and puts them into practice.

Hamlet in Purgatory

by Stephen Greenblatt

ISBN: 0-691-05873-3

Marvelous Possessions: The Wonder of the New World

by Stephen Greenblatt

Explores how Europeans of the late Middle Ages and early modern period represented newly discovered exotic peoples in travel narratives, judicial documents, and official reports. Especially shows how the sense of the marvellous was primarily used to encourage the appropriation of new lands (but not always).

Norton Anthology of English Literature: The Major Authors (Ninth Edition)

by Stephen Greenblatt Jahan Ramazani M. H. Abrams Jon Stallworthy James Simpson Catherine Robson George M. Logan James Noggle Jack Stillinger Carol T. Christ Alfred David Barbara K. Lewalski Lawrence Lipking Deidre Shauna Lynch Katharine Eisaman Maus

The main goal of this book is to bring together literary works of enduring value and to make them accessible, comprehensible, and pleasurable to a wide range of readers.

The Norton Anthology of English Literature: The Twentieth Century and After

by Stephen Greenblatt Jahan Ramazani M. H. Abrams Jon Stallworthy Greenblatt James Simpson Catherine Robson George M. Logan James Noggle Jack Stillinger Carol T. Christ Alfred David Barbara K. Lewalski Lawrence Lipking Deidre Shauna Lynch Katharine Eisaman Maus

The Ninth Edition offers more complete works and more teachable groupings than ever before, the apparatus you trust, and a new, free Supplemental Ebook with more than 1,000 additional texts. Read by more than 8 million students, The Norton Anthology of English Literature sets the standard and remains an unmatched value.

The Norton Anthology of English Literature: The Victorian Age

by Stephen Greenblatt Jahan Ramazani M. H. Abrams Jon Stallworthy James Simpson Catherine Robson George M. Logan James Noggle Jack Stillinger Carol T. Christ Alfred David Barbara K. Lewalski Lawrence Lipking Deidre Shauna Lynch Katharine Eisaman Maus

The Ninth Edition offers more complete works and more teachable groupings than ever before, the apparatus you trust, and a new, free Supplemental Ebook with more than 1,000 additional texts. Read by more than 8 million students, The Norton Anthology of English Literature sets the standard and remains an unmatched value.

The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Volume 1 (8th edition)

by Stephen Greenblatt M. H. Abrams

This volume is comprised of The Middle Ages, The 16th Century, The Early 17th Century, and The Restoration and The 18th Century.

The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Volume 1 (9th Edition)

by Stephen Greenblatt Jahan Ramazani M. H. Abrams Jon Stallworthy James Simpson Catherine Robson George M. Logan James Noggle Jack Stillinger Carol T. Christ Alfred David Barbara K. Lewalski Lawrence Lipking Deidre Shauna Lynch Katharine Eisaman Maus

The Ninth Edition offers more complete works and more teachable groupings than ever before, the apparatus you trust, and a new, free Supplemental Ebook with more than 1,000 additional texts. Read by more than 8 million students, The Norton Anthology of English Literature sets the standard and remains an unmatched value.

The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Volume 2 (8th edition)

by Stephen Greenblatt M. H. Abrams

This volume is comprised of The Romantic Period, The Victorian Age, and The Twentieth Century and After.

The Norton Anthology of English Literature, Volume 2 (9th Edition)

by Stephen Greenblatt Jahan Ramazani M. H. Abrams Jon Stallworthy James Simpson Catherine Robson George M. Logan James Noggle Jack Stillinger Carol T. Christ Alfred David Barbara K. Lewalski Lawrence Lipking Deidre Shauna Lynch Katharine Eisaman Maus

The Ninth Edition offers more complete works and more teachable groupings than ever before, the apparatus you trust, and a new, free Supplemental Ebook with more than 1,000 additional texts. Read by more than 8 million students, The Norton Anthology of English Literature sets the standard and remains an unmatched value.

Practicing New Historicism

by Stephen Greenblatt Catherine Gallagher

Discusses a new brand of literary criticism.

Religio Medici and Urne-Buriall

by Sir Thomas Browne Stephen Greenblatt Ramie Targoff

Sir Thomas Browne is one of the supreme stylists of the English language: a coiner of words and spinner of phrases to rival Shakespeare; the wielder of a weird and wonderful erudition; an inquiring spirit in the mold of Montaigne. Browne was an inspiration to the Romantics as well as to W.G. Sebald, and his work is quirky, sonorous, and enchanting. Here this baroque master's two most enduring and admired works, Religio Medici and Urne-Buriall, appear in a new edition that has been annotated and introduced by the distinguished scholars Ramie Targoff and Stephen Greenblatt (author of the best-selling Will in the World and the National Book Award-winning The Swerve). In Religio Medici Browne mulls over the relation between his medical profession and his profession of the Christian faith, pondering the respective claims of science and religion, questions that are still very much alive today. The discovery of an ancient burial site in an English field prompted Browne to write Urne-Buriall, which is both an early anthropological examination of different practices of interment and a profound meditation on mortality. Its grave and exquisite music has resounded for generations.

Reynard the Fox: A New Translation

by Stephen Greenblatt James Simpson

One of the greatest characters of medieval literature, the trickster Reynard the Fox, comes to life in this rollicking new translation. What do a weak lion king, a grief-stricken rooster, a dim-witted bear, and one really angry wolf have in common? The answer is they've all been had by one sly fox named Reynard. Originally bursting forth from Europe in the twelfth century, Reynard the Fox--a classic trickster narrative centered on a wily and gleefully amoral fox and his numerous victims in the animal kingdom--anticipated both Tex Avery and The Prince by showing that it's better to be clever than virtuous. However, where The Prince taught kings how to manipulate their subjects, Reynard the Fox demonstrated how, in a world of ruthless competition, clever subjects could outwit both their rulers and enemies alike. In these riotous pages, Reynard lies, cheats, or eats anyone and anything that he crosses paths with, conning the likes of Tybert the Cat, Bruin the Bear, and Bellin the Ram, among others. Reynard's rapacious nature and constant "stealing and roving" eventually bring him into conflict with the court of the less-than-perceptive Noble the Lion and the brutal Isengrim the Wolf, pitting cunning trickery against brute force. Unlike the animal fables of Aesop, which use small narratives to teach schoolboy morality, Reynard the Fox employs a dark and outrageous sense of humor to puncture the hypocritical authority figures of the "civilized" order, as the rhetorically brilliant fox outwits all comers by manipulating their bottomless greed. As James Simpson, one of the world's leading scholars of medieval literature, notes in his introduction, with translations in every major European language and twenty-three separate editions between 1481 and 1700 in England alone, the Reynard tales were ubiquitous. However, despite its immense popularity at the time, this brains-over-brawn parable largely disappeared. Now, for the first time in over a century, the fifteenth-century version of Reynard the Fox reemerges in this rollicking translation. Readers both young and old will be delighted by Reynard's exploits, as he excels at stitching up the vain, pompous, and crooked and escapes punishment no matter how tight the noose. Highlighted by new illustrations by Edith E. Newman, Simpson's translation of the late Middle English Caxton edition restores this classic as a part of a vital tradition that extends all the way to Br'er Rabbit, Bugs Bunny, and even Itchy & Scratchy. As Stephen Greenblatt writes in his foreword, Reynard is the "animal fable's version of Homer's Odysseus, the man of many wiles," proving that in a dog-eat-dog world the fox reigns supreme.

Shakespeare's Festive Comedy: A Study of Dramatic Form and Its Relation to Social Custom

by Stephen Greenblatt Cesar Lombardi Barber

In this classic work, acclaimed Shakespeare critic C. L. Barber argues that Elizabethan seasonal festivals such as May Day and Twelfth Night are the key to understanding Shakespeare's comedies. Brilliantly interweaving anthropology, social history, and literary criticism, Barber traces the inward journey--psychological, bodily, spiritual--of the comedies: from confusion, raucous laughter, aching desire, and aggression, to harmony. Revealing the interplay between social custom and dramatic form, the book shows how the Elizabethan antithesis between everyday and holiday comes to life in the comedies' combination of seriousness and levity."I have been led into an exploration of the way the social form of Elizabethan holidays contributed to the dramatic form of festive comedy. To relate this drama to holiday has proved to be the most effective way to describe its character. And this historical interplay between social and artistic form has an interest of its own: we can see here, with more clarity of outline and detail than is usually possible, how art develops underlying configurations in the social life of a culture."--C. L. Barber, in the Introduction This new edition includes a foreword by Stephen Greenblatt, who discusses Barber's influence on later scholars and the recent critical disagreements that Barber has inspired, showing that Shakespeare's Festive Comedy is as vital today as when it was originally published.

Shakespeare's Montaigne

by Michel De Montaigne Stephen Greenblatt John Florio Peter G. Platt

An NYRB Classics OriginalShakespeare, Nietzsche wrote, was Montaigne's best reader--a typically brilliant Nietzschean insight, capturing the intimate relationship between Montaigne's ever-changing record of the self and Shakespeare's kaleidoscopic register of human character. And there is no doubt that Shakespeare read Montaigne--though how extensively remains a matter of debate--and that the translation he read him in was that of John Florio, a fascinating polymath, man-about-town, and dazzlingly inventive writer himself.Florio's Montaigne is in fact one of the masterpieces of English prose, with a stylistic range and felicity and passages of deep lingering music that make it comparable to Sir Robert Burton's Anatomy of Melancholy and the works of Sir Thomas Browne. This new edition of this seminal work, edited by Stephen Greenblatt and Peter G. Platt, features an adroitly modernized text, an essay in which Greenblatt discusses both the resemblances and real tensions between Montaigne's and Shakespeare's visions of the world, and Platt's introduction to the life and times of the extraordinary Florio. Altogether, this book provides a remarkable new experience of not just two but three great writers who ushered in the modern world.

The Swerve

by Stephen Greenblatt

One of the world's most celebrated scholars, Stephen Greenblatt has crafted both an innovative work of history and a thrilling story of discovery, in which one manuscript, plucked from a thousand years of neglect, changed the course of human thought and made possible the world as we know it. Nearly six hundred years ago, a short, genial, cannily alert man in his late thirties took a very old manuscript off a library shelf, saw with excitement what he had discovered, and ordered that it be copied. That book was the last surviving manuscript of an ancient Roman philosophical epic, On the Nature of Things, by Lucretius--a beautiful poem of the most dangerous ideas: that the universe functioned without the aid of gods, that religious fear was damaging to human life, and that matter was made up of very small particles in eternal motion, colliding and swerving in new directions. The copying and translation of this ancient book-the greatest discovery of the greatest book-hunter of his age-fueled the Renaissance, inspiring artists such as Botticelli and thinkers such as Giordano Bruno; shaped the thought of Galileo and Freud, Darwin and Einstein; and had a revolutionary influence on writers such as Montaigne and Shakespeare and even Thomas Jefferson.

The Swerve: How the World Became Modern

by Stephen Greenblatt

Winner of the 2012 Pulitzer Prize for Non-Fiction Winner of the 2011 National Book Award for Non-Fiction One of the world's most celebrated scholars, Stephen Greenblatt has crafted both an innovative work of history and a thrilling story of discovery, in which one manuscript, plucked from a thousand years of neglect, changed the course of human thought and made possible the world as we know it. Nearly six hundred years ago, a short, genial, cannily alert man in his late thirties took a very old manuscript off a library shelf, saw with excitement what he had discovered, and ordered that it be copied. That book was the last surviving manuscript of an ancient Roman philosophical epic, On the Nature of Things, by Lucretius--a beautiful poem of the most dangerous ideas: that the universe functioned without the aid of gods, that religious fear was damaging to human life, and that matter was made up of very small particles in eternal motion, colliding and swerving in new directions. The copying and translation of this ancient book-the greatest discovery of the greatest book-hunter of his age-fueled the Renaissance, inspiring artists such as Botticelli and thinkers such as Giordano Bruno; shaped the thought of Galileo and Freud, Darwin and Einstein; and had a revolutionary influence on writers such as Montaigne and Shakespeare and even Thomas Jefferson.

The Swerve: How the World Became Modern

by Stephen Greenblatt

This engaging history of the birth of modernity and the Renaissance explores the rediscovery and popularization of Lucretious' poem On The Nature of Things, by the book collector Poggio Bracciolini in the fifteenth century, and the impact of the ideas of humanism and science it contained on future generations form Galileo to Einstein. The work is engaging and appropriate for general readers with an interest in the history of science and the Renaissance. Greenblatt is a professor of the humanities at Harvard University. Annotation ©2011 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Will in the World: How Shakespeare Became Shakespeare

by Stephen Greenblatt

"Greenblatt knows more about [Shakespeare] than Ben Jonson or the Dark Lady did."--John Leonard, ?Harper's A young man from a small provincial town moves to London in the late 1580s and, in a remarkably short time, becomes the greatest playwright not of his age alone but of all time. How is an achievement of this magnitude to be explained? How did Shakespeare become Shakespeare? Stephen Greenblatt brings us down to earth to see, hear, and feel how an acutely sensitive and talented boy, surrounded by the rich tapestry of Elizabethan life, could have become the world's greatest playwright. ?A Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award Finalist.

Will in the World: How Shakespeare Became Shakespeare

by Stephen Greenblatt

How does a young man from a small provincial town move to London in the late 1580s and in a remarkably short time, become the greatest playwright of all time?

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