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The Island of Dr. Moreau

by H. G. Wells John L. Flynn

A cautionary tale of the horrors that can ensue when man experiments with nature, from the father of science fiction, H.G. Wells. A lonely island in the Pacific. The sinister scientist who rules it. And the strange beings who dwell there... This is the scenario for H. G. Wells's haunting classic, one of his most intriguing and visionary novels. Living in the late nineteenth century and facing the impact of Darwin's theory of evolution, Wells wrote this chilling masterpiece about the characteristics of beasts blurring as the animals turn into men. Dr. Moreau, a scientist expelled from his homeland for his cruel vivisection experiments, finds a deserted island that gives him the freedom to continue torturous transplantations and create hideous creatures with manlike intelligence. But as the brutally enforced order on Moreau's island dissolves, the true consequences of his experiments emerge, and his creations revert to beasts more shocking than nature could devise. A genius of his time, H. G. Wells foresaw the use of what he called the "atom bomb," the practice of gene-splicing, and men landing on the moon. Now, when these have become part of everyday life, his dark fable serves as a compelling reminder of the horrors that reckless experiments with nature can produce. With an Introduction by Nita A. Farahany and an Afterword by Dr. John L. FlynnFrom the Paperback edition.

Little Wars

by H. G. Wells

This anthology is a thorough introduction to classic literature for those who have not yet experienced these literary masterworks. For those who have known and loved these works in the past, this is an invitation to reunite with old friends in a fresh new format. From Shakespeare's finesse to Oscar Wilde's wit, this unique collection brings together works as diverse and influential as The Pilgrim's Progress and Othello. As an anthology that invites readers to immerse themselves in the masterpieces of the literary giants, it is must-have addition to any library.

A Modern Utopia

by H. G. Wells

Because of the complexity and sophistication of its narrative structure, H.G. Wells's A Modern Utopia (1905) has been called "not so much a modern as a postmodern utopia." The novel is best known for its notion that a voluntary order of nobility known as the Samurai could effectively rule a "kinetic and not static" world state so as to solve "the problem of combining progress with political stability."

Outline of History, Volume II, Medieval History

by H. G. Wells

The rise and collapse of the Roman empire, Christianity and Islam, and the Mongol empire, during medieval times.

Selected Stories of H. G. Wells

by H. G. Wells Ursula K. Le Guin

Le Guin's selection of twenty-six stories showcases Well's genius and reintroduces readers to his singular talent for making the unbelievable seem utterly plausible.

The Somme: Also Including The Coward

by H. G. Wells A. D. Gristwood

Two World War I classics: The story of a British soldier enduring the battle in France and a novella starring a man who takes drastic steps to escape the Great War.The million British dead have left no books behind. What they felt as they died hour by hour in the mud, or were choked horribly with gas, or relinquished their reluctant lives on stretchers, no witness tells. But here is a book that almost tells it. . . . Mr. Gristwood has had the relentless simplicity to recall things as they were; he was as nearly dead as he could be without dying, and he has smelt the stench of his own corruption. This is the story of millions of men--of millions." --H. G. Wells In The Somme and its companion The Coward, first published in 1927, the heroics of war and noble self-sacrifice are completely absent, replaced by the gritty realism of life for the ordinary soldier in World War I and an unflinching portrayal of the horrors of war. Written under the guidance of master storyteller H. G. Wells, they are classics of the genre. Based on A. D. Gristwood's own wartime experiences, The Somme revolves around a futile attack during the 1916 Somme campaign. On the battlefront, Tom Everitt is wounded and must be moved back through a series of dressing stations to the General Hospital at Rouen. Few other accounts of the war give such an accurate picture of trench life, and The Spectator praised Gristwood's "very effective writing," calling The Somme "a book which anyone who was not in the War should read."The Coward concerns a man who shoots himself in the hand to escape the chaos during the March 1918 retreat--an offense punishable by death--and is haunted by fear of discovery and self-loathing. Together, these works offer a vivid, immersive view of the First World War and the suffering it inflicted on the men who fought it.

Tales of Space and Time

by H. G. Wells

Tales of Space and Time is a fantasy and science fiction collection of three short stories and two novellas written by the English author H. G. Wells between 1897 and 1898.

The Time Machine

by H. G. Wells

One of the greatest science fiction writers of all time paints a vivid and terrifying picture of humanity's possible future. An unnamed inventor tests his latest creation - a time machine. It works, pulling him far into the future, but while exploring this new world the time machine is stolen, forcing the Time Traveller to rely on help from the innocent, idyllic Eloi to recover it from the brutal, subterranean Morlocks. The book touches on socio-political issues such as classism and industrialization. It has been adapted for film twice. Penguin Random House Canada is proud to bring you classic works of literature in e-book form, with the highest quality production values. Find more today and rediscover books you never knew you loved.

The Time Machine

by H. G. Wells

English novelist, historian and science writer Herbert George Wells (1866-1946) abandoned teaching and launched his literary career with a series of highly successful science-fiction novels. The Time Machine was the first of a number of these imaginative literary inventions. First published in 1895, the novel follows the adventures of a hypothetical Time Traveller who journeys into the future to find that humanity has evolved into two races: the peaceful Eloi -- vegetarians who tire easily -- and the carnivorous, predatory Morlocks.After narrowly escaping from the Morlocks, the Time Traveller undertakes another journey even further into the future where he finds the earth growing bitterly cold as the heat and energy of the sun wane. Horrified, he returns to the present, but soon departs again on his final journey.While the novel is underpinned with both Darwinian and Marxist theory and offers fascinating food for thought about the world of the future, it also succeeds as an exciting blend of adventure and pseudo-scientific romance. Sure to delight lovers of the fantastic and bizarre, The Time Machine is a book that belongs on the shelf of every science-fiction fan.

The Time Machine

by H. G. Wells

HG Wells science fiction fantasy, The Time Machine challenges the reader's mind to the possibility of time travel.

The Time Machine

by H. G. Wells

Illus. in black-and-white. When a turn-of-the-century scientist travels into the distant future in his time machine, he expects to find progress and superior people. But instead he discovers a world in decay. Reading level: 2.4.

The Time Machine

by H. G. Wells Greg Bear

"I've had a most amazing time...." So begins the Time Traveller's astonishing firsthand account of his journey 800,000 years beyond his own era--and the story that launched H.G. Wells's successful career and earned him his reputation as the father of science fiction. With a speculative leap that still fires the imagination, Wells sends his brave explorer to face a future burdened with our greatest hopes...and our darkest fears. A pull of the Time Machine's lever propels him to the age of a slowly dying Earth. There he discovers two bizarre races--the ethereal Eloi and the subterranean Morlocks--who not only symbolize the duality of human nature, but offer a terrifying portrait of the men of tomorrow as well. Published in 1895, this masterpiece of invention captivated readers on the threshold of a new century. Thanks to Wells's expert storytelling and provocative insight, The Time Machine will continue to enthrall readers for generations to come.

The Time Machine

by H. G. Wells Cynthia Brantley Johnson

ENDURING LITERATURE ILLUMINATED BY PRACTICAL SCHOLARSHIP EACH ENRICHED CLASSIC EDITION INCLUDES: A concise introduction that gives readers important background information A chronology of the author's life and work A timeline of significant events that provides the book's historical context An outline of key themes and plot points to help readers form their own interpretations Detailed explanatory notes Critical analysis, including contemporary and modern perspectives on the work Discussion questions to promote lively classroom and book group interaction A list of recommended related books and films to broaden the reader's experience Enriched Classics offer readers affordable editions of great works of literature enhanced by helpful notes and insightful commentary. The scholarship provided in Enriched Classics enables readers to appreciate, understand, and enjoy the world's finest books to their full potential. SERIES EDITED BY CYNTHIA BRANTLEY JOHNSON

The Time Machine

by H. G. Wells Les Martin John Edens

Illus. in black-and-white. When a turn-of-the-century scientist travels into the distant future in his time machine, he expects to find progress and superior people. But instead he discovers a world in decay. Reading level: 2.4. From the Trade Paperback edition.

The Time Machine

by H. G. Wells Ursula K. Le Guin W. A. Dwiggins

When the Time Traveller courageously stepped out of his machine for the first time, he found himself in the year 802,700--and everything has changed. In another, more utopian age, creatures seemed to dwell together in perfect harmony. The Time Traveller thought he could study these marvelous beings--unearth their secret and then retum to his own time--until he discovered that his invention, his only avenue of escape, had been stolen. H.G. Well's famous novel of one man's astonishing journey beyond the conventional limits of the imagination first appeared in 1895. It won him immediate recognition, and has been regarded ever since as one of the great masterpieces in the literature of science fiction.From the Paperback edition.

The Time Machine (adapted)

by H. G. Wells Les Martin John Edens

The Time traveler invents a machine that takes him from the year 1895 to the year 802,701, and discovers a world that seems perfect. But when he discovers that the people in the future are in danger, will he be able to save them?

The Time Machine, The Invisible Man, The War of the Worlds

by H. G. Wells Margaret Drabble

Gathered together in one hardcover volume: three timeless novels from the founding father of science fiction.The first great novel to imagine time travel, The Time Machine (1895) follows its scientist narrator on an incredible journey that takes him finally to Earth's last moments--and perhaps his own. The scientist who discovers how to transform himself in The Invisible Man (1897) will also discover, too late, that he has become unmoored from society and from his own sanity. The War of the Worlds (1898)--the seminal masterpiece of alien invasion adapted by Orson Welles for his notorious 1938 radio drama, and subsequently by several filmmakers--imagines a fierce race of Martians who devastate Earth and feed on their human victims while their voracious vegetation, the red weed, spreads over the ruined planet.Here are three classic science fiction novels that, more than a century after their original publication, show no sign of losing their grip on readers' imaginations.From the Hardcover edition.

The Time Machine/The War of the Worlds

by H. G. Wells

In his "scientific romances," H. G. Wells was less concerned with scientific principles than with the need to show how human arrogance tends to unleash ferociously destructive forces. In The Time Machine (1895), for example, the pleasure-loving Eloi are preyed on by the brutish Morlocks-an outcome Wells thought likely if capitalism continued unchecked. The need for mankind's humility is most pointed in The War of the Worlds (1898), where nothing human is able to stop the Martian takeover of Earth. In 1938 Orson Welles adapted The War of the Worlds as a radio script and interrupted a New York broadcast to announce, earnestly and believably, that Martians had landed in New Jersey. Mass hysteria erupted. Both it and The Time Machine have been turned into successful movies.

Tono Bungay

by H. G. Wells

Tono-Bungay

by H. G. Wells Andrea Barrett

The story of an apprentice chemist whose uncle's worthless medicine becomes a spectacular marketing success, Tono-Bungay earned H. G. Wells immediate acclaim when it appeared in 1909. It remains a sparkling chronicle of chicanery and human credulity, and is today regarded by many as Wells's greatest novel. As Andrea Barrett observes in her Introduction, "Through its detailed, often brilliant descriptions and powerful imagery, [Tono-Bungay] slyly satirizes British imperial policy as a whole. . . . The insights into class, money, advertising, public relations, and the power of the press still ring horrifyingly true."This Modern Library Paperback Classic is set from the text of the original 1909 edition.From the Trade Paperback edition.

War and the Future

by H. G. Wells

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