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Again, Dangerous Visions

by Harlan Ellison

Over the course of his legendary career, Harlan Ellison has defied--and sometimes defined--modern fantasy literature, all while refusing to allow any genre to claim him. A Grand Master of the Science Fiction Writers of America, winner of the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Horror Writers Association as well as winner of countless awards, including the Hugo, Nebula, Edgar Allan Poe, and Bram Stoker, Ellison is as unpredictable as he is unique, irrepressible as he is infuriating. Over thirty titles in Ellison's brilliant catalog are now available in an elegant new package featuring Ellison himself. Genius never felt so combustible. Again, Dangerous Visions is the classic companion to the most essential science fiction anthology ever published, and includes forty-six original stories edited and with introductions by Harlan Ellison, featuring John Heidenry, Ross Rocklynne, Ursula K. Le Guin, Andrew J. Offutt, Gene Wolfe, Ray Nelson, Ray Bradbury, Chad Oliver, Edward Bryant, Kate Wilhelm, James B. Hemesath, Joanna Russ, Kurt Vonnegut, T. L. Sherred, K. M. O'Donnell (Barry N. Malzberg), H. H. Hollis, Bernard Wolfe, David Gerrold, Piers Anthony, Lee Hoffman, Gahan Wilson, Joan Bernott, Gregory Benford, Evelyn Lief, James Sallis, Josephine Saxton, Ken McCullough, David Kerr, Burt K. Filer, Richard Hill, Leonard Tushnet, Ben Bova, Dean Koontz, James Blish and Judith Ann Lawrence, A. Parra (y Figueredo), Thomas M. Disch, Richard A. Lupoff, M. John Harrison, Robin Scott, Andrew Weiner, Terry Carr, and James Tiptree Jr.

Angry Candy

by Harlan Ellison

The Seattle Times said of Angry Candy: "Ellison's stories rattle the bars of complacency that people put around their souls . . . Razor sharp . . . piercingly profound." Once again, Ellison's writing defies all labels. These seventeen stories by a modern master are an "assembled artifact" of anger and faith - as bittersweet as a"jalapeno-laced cinnamon bear." The sixteen stories collected here are spread over the farthest stretches of time and space, but even the bleakest of them is warmed by a passionate faith in the endurance of life and its ultimate possibilities.

Angry Candy

by Harlan Ellison

A collection of short stories.

Angry Candy

by Harlan Ellison Patton Oswalt

"Don't be alarmed, folks! He can't break those shackles -- they're forged of chrome-steel!" -- Penultimate words of Carl Denham. Winner of the World Fantasy Award for best short story collection, this volume by one of the most acclaimed authors of the twentieth century takes an intense look at how the specter of death haunts everyday life. Seventeen astonishing tales include the Hugo Award-winning novelette "Paladin of the Lost Hour" and "Soft Monkey," winner of the 1988 Edgar Allan Poe Award for short story fiction. This edition includes a new Introduction by actor/comedian Patton Oswalt. Harlan Ellison has written and published 120 books and has been lauded by sources as impressive as The New York Times and The Los Angeles Times, which noted, "It is long past time to call Harlan Ellison the twentieth-century Mark Twain." His name is a Registered Trademark and impassioned praise comes to him from Stephen King, Joyce Carol Oates, and Dean Koontz. Online (harlanellisonbooks.com) and a laudatory YouTube site put up by Ellison's celebrity friends has over 1,000,000 hits on his "Pay the Writer" shout-out. You could look him up: he can't break those shackles.

Approaching Oblivion

by Harlan Ellison

Over the course of his legendary career, Harlan Ellison has defied--and sometimes defined--modern fantasy literature, all while refusing to allow any genre to claim him. A Grand Master of the Science Fiction Writers of America, winner of the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Horror Writers Association, as well as winner of countless awards, including the Hugo, Nebula, Edgar Allan Poe, and Bram Stoker, Ellison is as unpredictable as he is unique, irrepressible as he is infuriating. Over thirty titles in Ellison's brilliant catalog are now available in an elegant new package featuring Ellison himself. Genius never felt so combustible. The New York Times called him "relentlessly honest" and then used him as the subject of its famous Sunday Acrostic. People said there was no one like him, then cursed him for preventing easy sleep. But in these stories, Harlan Ellison outdoes himself, rampaging like a mad thing through love ("Cold Friend," "Kiss of Fire," "Paulie Charmed the Sleeping Woman"), hate ("Knox," "Silent in Gehenna"), sex ("Catman," "Erotophobia"), lost childhood ("One Life, Furnished in Early Poverty"), and into such bizarre subjects as the problems of blue-skinned, eleven-armed Yiddish aliens, what it is like to witness the end of the world, and what happens on the day the planet Earth swallows Barbra Streisand. Oh yeah, this one is a doozy!

Approaching Oblivion: Road Signs on the Treadmill Toward Tomorrow

by Harlan Ellison

The New York Times called him "relentlessly honest" and then used him as the subject of its famous Sunday Acrostic. People Magizine said there was no one like him, then cursed him for preventing easy sleep. But in these stories Harlan Ellison outdoes himself, rampaging like a mad thing through love ("Cold Friend", "Kiss of Fire", "Paulie Charmed the Sleeping Woman"), hate ("Knox", "Silent in Gehenna"), sex ("Catman", "Erotophobia"), lost childhood ("One Life, Furnished in Early Poverty") and into such bizarre subjects as the problems of blue-skinned, eleven-armed Yiddish aliens, what it's like to witness the end of the world and what happens on the day the planet Earth swallows Barbra Streisand. Oh yeah, this one's a doozy!

The Beast That Shouted Love at the Heart of the World

by Harlan Ellison

"It crouches near the center of creation. There is no night where it waits. Only the riddle of which terrible dream will set it loose. It beheaded mercy to take possession of that place. It feasts on darkness from the minds of men. No one has ever seen its eyeless face. When it sleeps we know a few moments of peace. But when it breathes again we go down in fire and mate with jackals. It knows our fear. It has our number. It waited for our coming and it will abide long after we have become congealed smoke. It has never heard music, and shows its fangs when we panic. It is the beast of our savage past, hungering today, and waiting patiently for the mortal meal of all our golden tomorrows. It lies waiting." This fantastic short story collection features two of Ellison's most famous, the Nebula Award winner "A Boy and His Dog" and the Hugo Award-winning short story that lends the collection its title. These and the entire book will knock you off your feet.

The Beast That Shouted Love at the Heart of the World

by Harlan Ellison

"It crouches near the center of creation. There is no night where it waits. Only the riddle of which terrible dream will set it loose. It beheaded mercy to take possession of that place. It feasts on darkness from the minds of men. No one has ever seen its eyeless face. When it sleeps we know a few moments of peace. But when it breathes again we go down in fire and mate with jackals. It knows our fear. It has our number. It waited for our coming and it will abide long after we have become congealed smoke. It has never heard music, and shows its fangs when we panic. It is the beast of our savage past, hungering today, and waiting patiently for the mortal meal of all our golden tomorrows. It lies waiting. " --Harlan Ellison. 15 stories by Harlan Ellison.

A Boy and His Dog

by Harlan Ellison

Winner of the Nebula Award: A boy and his telepathic dog fight to survive in a war-torn, postapocalyptic world in this hard-hitting science fiction novella. In an alternate world in which John F. Kennedy survived and scientific breakthroughs in animal research and telepathy allow for advanced communication with animal companions, fifteen-year-old Vic and his telepathic dog, Blood, scavenge the wastelands of a war-torn United States, survivors of a nuclear World War III between the Americans and the Soviets. While Blood guides Vic toward women--to be used for sex--Vic ensures that Blood has food, but the symbiotic relationship is put at risk when the pair meets Quilla June Holmes, who lures the boy to an underground civilization. A piece of shocking, dystopic science fiction, A Boy and His Dog questions the boundaries and nature of love while crafting a vision of a dark future guaranteed to leave chills. Also included here is "Ahbhu: The Passing of One Man's Inspiration and Best Friend," a personal essay by author Harlan Ellison, which lovingly recounts the life of his canine companion, Ahbhu, the true-life basis for Blood. Ellison recalls rescuing Ahbhu from the West Los Angeles Animal Shelter and gives a brief chronicle of life with his furry friend, whom he stresses was both "a person" and "impossible to anthropomorphize." The nostalgic in memoriam frames the author's relationship with animals while casting a personal light on the inspiration for the novella with which it is paired. Winner of the Nebula Award for Best Novella and a Hugo Award finalist, A Boy and His Dog was adapted into a cult classic film and fully solidifies Ellison as a master of his craft. This volume combines a dark, dystopian future of animal telepathy, sex, and postapocalyptic underworlds with a real-life account of the author's muse for the feisty but loyal Blood. Indispensible reading material for any fan of Ellison or dark science fiction, animal lovers will also delight over the relationship between Vic and Blood.

Children of the Streets

by Harlan Ellison

When he is down, kick for the head and groin. Avoid cops. Play it cool. There are not many rules in the primer for gang kids, but they all count. They are all easily understood, because they use a simple and sound philosophy--it's a stinking life, so get your kicks while you can. The gang is home, take what you want, tell them nothing--and do not get caught. Two gangs of juvenile delinquents run riot in New York City. They constantly try to outdo each other with their clothes, weapons, language, and lack of morals. They are not just kids playing at war--they mean business. The only person who can infiltrate the gang is someone they can trust, someone like themselves. Someone who knows how to handle a knife and a gun . . . If all you know of Harlan Ellison is his speculative fiction, prepare yourself for the breakneck reality of Children of the Streets.

The City on the Edge of Forever

by Harlan Ellison

The original teleplay that became the classic Star Trek episode, with an expanded introductory essay by Harlan Ellison, The City on the Edge of Forever has been surrounded by controversy since the airing of an "eviscerated" version--which subsequently has been voted the most beloved episode in the series' history. In its original form, The City on the Edge of Forever won the 1966-67 Writers Guild of America Award for best teleplay. As aired, it won the 1967 Hugo Award. The City on the Edge of Forever is, at its most basic, a poignant love story. Ellison takes the reader on a breathtaking trip through space and time, from the future, all the way back to 1930s America. In this harrowing journey, Kirk and Spock race to apprehend a renegade criminal and restore the order of the universe. It is here that Kirk faces his ultimate dilemma: a choice between the universe--or his one true love. This edition makes available the astonishing teleplay as Ellison intended it to be aired. The author's introductory essay reveals all of the details of what Ellison describes as a "fatally inept treatment" of his creative work. Was he unjustly edited, unjustly accused, and unjustly treated?

Dangerous Visions

by Harlan Ellison

Anthologies seldom make history, but Dangerous Visions is a grand exception. Harlan Ellison's 1967 collection of science fiction stories set an almost impossibly high standard, as more than a half dozen of its stories won major awards - not surpising with a contributor list that reads like a who's who of 20th-century SF: Samuel R. Delany, Philip K. Dick, Brian Aldiss, Roger Zelazny, Philip José Farmer, Fritz Leiber, Larry Niven and Robert Silverberg. Unavailable for 15 years, this huge anthology now returns to print, as relevant now as when it was first published. and/or Mr. Morrison by Carol Emshwiller | Shall the Dust Praise Thee? by Damon Knight | If All Men Were Brothers, Would You Let One Marry Your Sister? by Theodore Sturgeon | What Happened to Auguste Clarot? by Larry Eisenberg | Ersatz by Henry Slesar | Go, Go, Go, Said the Bird by Sonya Dorman | The Happy Breed by John Sladek | Encounter with a Hick by Jonathan Brand | From the Government Printing Office by Kris Neville | Land of the Great Horses by R. A. Lafferty | The Recognition by J. G. Ballard | Judas by John Brunner | Test to Destruction by Keith Laumer | Carcinoma Angels by Norman Spinrad | Auto-da-Fé by Roger Zelazny | Aye, and Gomorrah by Samuel R. Delany Unavailable for 15 years, this huge anthology now returns to print, as relevant now as when it was first published.

The Deadly Streets

by Harlan Ellison

Remember Charles Bronson stalking the streets of New York blowing holes in muggers in Death Wish? Remember Glenn Ford standing off the vicious juvenile delinquents in Blackboard Jungle? Well, it is more than fifty years and two different worlds from 1955 to now. And something the author of these stories knows that you are scared to admit is that reality and fantasy have flip-flopped. They have switched places. The stories that scare you today are the ones about rapists and thugs, psychos who will carve you for a dollar and hypes who will bust your head to get fixed. Glenn Ford's world was yesterday, and Bronson's is today. And in the stalking midnight of this book, one of America's top writers, Harlan Ellison, invades the shadows of both!

Deathbird Stories

by Harlan Ellison

"Men rarely (if ever) manage to dream up a god superior to themselves. Most gods have the manners and morals of a spoiled child." --Robert Heinlein, 1973 A masterwork of myth and terror, Deathbird Stories collects nineteen of Harlan Ellison's best stories written over the course of a decade. In it, ancient gods fade as modern society creates new deities to worship--gods of technology, drugs, gambling. Revolutionary when first published, the short stories contained here have won multiple honors, including the prestigious Hugo and British Science Fiction Awards. They have inspired a generation of readers and other authors to reexamine blind faith and fight against crumbling institutions. Stark and often angry, this collection strips away convention and hypocrisy and lays bare the human condition. After all, the gods we invent contain all too much of their inventors.

An Edge in My Voice

by Harlan Ellison

At the beginning of the 1980s, Harlan Ellison agreed to write a regular column for the L.A. Weekly on the condition that they published whatever he wrote with no revisions and no suggestions for rewrites. What resulted was impassioned, persuasive, abusive, and hilarious. Part essay, part conversation, all Ellison--these pieces provide a glimpse into a great mind, at ease in tackling both grand ideas and the minutiae of the day to day. Collected here in An Edge in My Voice, these works also open a window to a decade when a newspaper would accept such a risky venture from such a powerful voice,

Ellison Wonderland

by Harlan Ellison

Originally published in 1962 and updated in later decades with a new introduction, Ellison Wonderland contains sixteen masterful stories from the author's early career. This collection shows a vibrant young writer with a wide-ranging imagination, ferocious creative energy, devastating wit, and an eye for the wonderful and terrifying and tragic. Among the gems are "All the Sounds of Fear," "The Sky Is Burning," "The Very Last Day of a Good Woman," and "In Lonely Lands." Though they stand tall on their own merits, they also point the way to the sublime stories that followed soon after and continue to come even now, more than fifty years later.

From the Land of Fear

by Harlan Ellison

Eleven side trips to the dark edge of imagination by master storyteller Harlan Ellison, From the Land of Fear presents some of the author's early work from his start in the late fifties. Here you can see a vibrant, imaginative young writer honing his craft and sowing the seeds of what would become his brilliant career, including the standout piece "Soldier," a clever antiwar tale included both in short-story form and as a screenplay for TV's The Outer Limits. True Ellison fans will enjoy this collection as a chance to see the writer's growth over time. As Roger Zelanzy says in his wonderful Introduction, "He is what he is because of everything he's been up until the Now."

Gentleman Junkie

by Harlan Ellison

Bold and uncompromising, Gentleman Junkie and Other Stories of the Hung-up Generation is a watershed moment in Harlan Ellison's early writing career. Rather than dealing in speculative fiction, these twenty-five short stories directly tackle issues of discrimination, injustice, bigotry, and oppression by the police. Pulling from his own experience, Ellison paints vivid portraits of the helpless and downtrodden, blazing forth with the kind of unblinking honesty that would define his career. Reviewing this collection, Dorothy Parker called Ellison "a good, honest, clean writer, putting down what he has seen and known, and no sensationalism about it."

The Glass Teat

by Harlan Ellison

In the late 1960s Harlan Ellison, launched a weekly column for the Los Angeles Free Press, where he uncompromisingly discussed the effects of television on modern society. He assaulted everything from television sitcoms to corrupt politicians, talk shows to military massacres. Today, more than four decades later, almost all of his criticism still holds true.Open Road and Edgeworks Abbey, Ellison's company, are proud to make this first volume of fifty-two outspoken columns widely available. Do not miss the second volume, The Other Glass Teat.

The Harlan Ellison Hornbook

by Harlan Ellison

A major collection of Harlan Ellison's incomparable, troublemaking, uncompromising, confrontational essays and newspaper columns, The Harlan Ellison Hornbook mines deep into the author's colorful past. Failed love affairs, departed pets, a defense of comic books--in lesser hands, these subjects would be pabulum or treacle. When Harlan Ellison is behind the typewriter, the mundane becomes an all-out intellectual brawl. Emotionally moving and verbally stimulating, these columns cannot be missed, especially Ellison's article on controversial comedian Lenny Bruce or the chilling account of the author's trip to visit a death row inmate in San Quentin State Prison.

Harlan Ellison's Movie

by Harlan Ellison

Herein lies in written form Harlan Ellison's Movie, the full-length feature film Ellison created when a producer at 20th Century-Fox said, "If we gave you the money, and no interference, what sort of movie would you write?" Well, that producer is no longer at the studio; he left the entire venue of moviemaking after Harlan Ellison's Movie was seen by the Suits. There is no use even trying to describe what the film is about, except to confirm the long-standing rumor that it contains a scene in which a 70-foot-tall boll weevil chews and swallows an entire farmhouse and silo on-camera. (It is Scene 33C.)

Harlan Ellison's Watching

by Harlan Ellison

Ostensibly, this is a collection of Harlan Ellison's twenty-five years of essays and film criticism for various publications. What it is in reality is pure, raw, unapologetic opinion. Star Wars? "Luke Skywalker is a nerd and Darth Vader sucks runny eggs." Big Trouble in Little China? "A cheerfully blathering live-action cartoon that will give you release from the real pressures of your basically dreary lives." Despite working within the industry himself, Ellison never learned how to lie. So punches go un-pulled, the impersonal becomes personal, and the reader is left feeling like they have read something someone actually meant. It is a gauntlet, for sure, but it is also an exhilarating release.

I Have No Mouth and I Must Scream

by Harlan Ellison

Among Ellison's more famous stories, two consistently noted as his very best ever are the Hugo Award-winning, postapocalyptic title story of this collection of seven shorts and the volume's concluding story, "Pretty Maggie Moneyeyes." Since Ellison himself strongly resists categorization of his work, we will not call them science fiction, or SF, or speculative fiction or horror or anything else except compelling reading experiences that are utterly unique. They could only have been written by the great Harlan Ellison, and they are incomparably original.

Jacques Futrelle's "The Thinking Machine"

by Harlan Ellison Jacques Futrelle

This irascible genius, this diminutive egghead scientist, known to the world as "The Thinking Machine," is no less than the newly rediscovered literary link between Sherlock Holmes and Nero Wolfe: Professor Augustus S. F. X. Van Dusen, who--with only the power of ratiocination--unravels problems of outrageous criminous activity in dazzlingly impossible settings. He can escape from the inescapable death-row "Cell 13." He can fathom why the young woman chopped off her own finger. He can solve the anomaly of the phone that could not speak. These twenty-three Edwardian-era adventures prove (as The Thinking Machine reiterates) that "two and two make four, not sometimes, but all the time."From the Trade Paperback edition.

Love Ain't Nothing But Sex Misspelled

by Harlan Ellison

Love has ten thousand names and a million different faces. History will surely agree that America's most destructive contribution to twentieth century living has been that damaged product called plastic romance. It twists and savages us. After a lifetime of lies about what love is supposed to be, are you finally angry and depressed enough to be part of a "recall" on that shabby, mildewed merchandise? If so, join the remarkable Harlan Ellison as he dissects the soul and body of love in our time. In sixteen scalpel-sharp stories that range from the legalized whorehouses of Nevada to the steaming lynch towns of Georgia, from the abortion mills of Tijuana to the soundstages of Hollywood, the author rips the Saran-Wrap off love and hate and sin and twittering passion to disclose the raw meat beneath. Here are sixteen poisoned arrows from fantasy's most improbable Cupid, in which he presents a world of hearts and flowers guaranteed to revise your thinking about where love is found and how it looks.

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