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A la caza de la mujer

by James Ellroy

El legendario autor de novela policiaca nos ofrece unas memorias crudas y brutalmente sinceras, tan intensas como cualquiera de sus otras novelas. En 1959, James Ellroy tenía diez años. Su madre, Jean Hilliker, que acababa de divorciarse de su marido, le hizo un regalo y le dio a su hijo una elección: vivir con ella o con su padre. James eligió a su padre, y su madre le pegó una bofetada. Desde el suelo, él le deseó que se muriera, y tres meses después fue asesinada.A la caza de la mujer es la confesión de un depredador, un tratado sobre la culpabilidad y sobre el poder de una maldición, pero ante todo es una confesión apasionada. James Ellroy describe abiertamente su dura infancia, su época de joven delincuente, su vida de escritor, sus historias amorosas y sus matrimonios, sus ataques de nervios, y el inicio de una relación extraordinaria con una mujer que posiblemente sea la que siempre ha estado buscando.A la caza de la mujer es una obra brillante que muestra con sinceridad el alma de James Ellroy. Seguro que nunca antes habrá leído unas memorias como estas.

American Tabloid

by James Ellroy

CHOSEN BY TIME MAGAZINE AS ONE OF THE TEN BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR"ONE HELLISHLY EXCITING RIDE."--Detroit Free PressThe '50s are finished. Zealous young senator Robert Kennedy has a red-hot jones to nail Jimmy Hoffa. JFK has his eyes on the Oval Office. J. Edgar Hoover is swooping down on the Red Menace. Howard Hughes is dodging subpoenas and digging up Kennedy dirt. And Castro is mopping up the bloody aftermath of his new communist nation."HARD-BITTEN. . . INGENIOUS. . . ELLROY SEGUES INTO POLITICAL INTRIGUE WITHOUT MISSING A BEAT."--The New York TimesIn the thick of it: FBI men Kemper Boyd and Ward Littell. They work every side of the street, jerking the chains of made men, street scum, and celebrities alike, while Pete Bondurant, ex-rogue cop, freelance enforcer, troubleshooter, and troublemaker, has the conscience to louse it all up."VASTLY ENTERTAINING."--Los Angeles TimesMob bosses, politicos, snitches, psychos, fall guys, and femmes fatale. They're mixing up a molotov cocktail guaranteed to end the country's innocence with a bang. Dig that crazy beat: it's America's heart racing out of control. . . ."A SUPREMELY CONTROLLED WORK OF ART."--The New York Times Book ReviewFrom the Paperback edition.

Because the Night

by James Ellroy

Novel of magic and police.

Because the Night

by James Ellroy

While scouring the streets for a missing cop, an L.A. detective uncovers a terrifying crimeThere was never a better cop than Jungle Jack Herzog. A wiry man whose strength exceeded his frame, his ability to navigate the darkest corners of the City of Angels drew him repeated citations for bravery. Nicknamed the Alchemist for his uncanny ability to fake new identities, he did his best work as an undercover agent in the vice squad, disappearing into the underworld in the name of justice. Now he has disappeared for good. It's a bad sign that Lloyd Hopkins catches Jungle Jack's case, because Hopkins works homicide. As he attempts to discover what happened to the missing cop, he investigates a strange murder committed with a revolver that predates the Civil War. There is a horrifying secret behind the cop's disappearance, but Lloyd Hopkins does not fear the truth.

The Best American Crime Writing 2005

by James Ellroy Otto Penzler Thomas H. Cook

The 2005 edition of The Best American Crime Writing offers the year's most shocking, compelling, and gripping writing about real-life crime, including Peter Landesman's article about female sex slaves (the most requested and widely read New York Times story of 2004), a piece from The New Yorker by Stephen J. Dubner (the coauthor of Freakanomics) about a high-society silver thief, and an extraordinarily memorable "ode to bar fights" written by Jonathan Miles for Men's Journal after he punched an editor at a staff party. But this year's edition includes a bonus -- an original essay by James Ellroy detailing his fascination with Joseph Wambaugh and how it fed his obsession with crime -- even to the point of selling his own blood to buy Wambaugh's books. Smart, entertaining, and controversial, The Best American Crime Writing is an essential edition to any crime enthusiast's bookshelf.

The Best American Mystery Stories 2002

by James Ellroy

Bestselling novelist James Ellroy introduces this year's collection of the finest mystery writing. Many of the contributors herein are novelists themselves, displaying their talents in short story form: Michael Connelly tells a fatal tale of revenge in "Two-Bagger." In Joe Gores's "Inscrutable," the Feds beat the Mafia at their own game. Stuart Kaminsky demonstrates how horribly wrong things go when a robber gets cocky in "Sometimes Something Goes Wrong. " And Robert B. Parker shows just how important Jackie Robinson's fans can be in "Harlem Nocturne." Also featured are veterans of the short story form and favorites of this series. Brendan DuBois's "A Family Game" introduces a former Mafia family trying to lead a normal life in the Witness Protection Program. Joyce Carol Oates tells a chilling tale of a crush taken too far in "The High School Sweetheart." A tenant sneaks into the murder crime scene next door in Michael Downs's "Man Kills Wife, Two Dogs." Readers will be captivated by all the stories herein, whether by famed novelists or masters of the short story.

The Best American Noir of the Century

by James Ellroy Otto Penzler

James Ellroy and Otto Penzler mined the past century to find this treasure trove of thirty-nine stories. From noir's twenties-era infancy come gems like James M. Cain's "Pastorale," and its postwar heyday boasts giants like Mickey Spillane and Evan Hunter. Packing an undeniable punch, diverse contemporary incarnations include Elmore Leonard, Patricia Highsmith, Joyce Carol Oates, Dennis Lehane, and William Gay, with many page-turners appearing from the past decade.

The Big Nowhere

by James Ellroy

Los Angeles, 1950 Red crosscurrents: the Commie Scare and a string of brutal mutilation killings. Gangland intrigue and Hollywood sleaze. Three cops caught in a hellish web of ambition, perversion, and deceit. Danny Upshaw is a Sheriff's deputy stuck with a bunch of snuffs nobody cares about; they're his chance to make his name as a cop...and to sate his darkest curiosities. Mal Considine is D.A.'s Bureau brass. He's climbing on the Red Scare bandwagon to advance his career and to gain custody of his adopted son, a child he saved from the horror of postwar Europe. Buzz Meeks-bagman, ex-Narco goon, and pimp for Howard Hughes-is fighting communism for the money. All three men have purchased tickets to a nightmare.

The Black Dahlia

by James Ellroy

The Black Dahlia is a roman noir on an epic scale: a classic period piece that provides a startling conclusion to America's most infamous unsolved murder mystery--the murder of the beautiful young woman known as The Black Dahlia.

Blood on the Moon

by James Ellroy

In the first Lloyd Hopkins novel, an L.A. homicide detective chases a cunning serial killerLloyd Hopkins was not yet a cop when the Watts riots ripped Los Angeles apart. A member of the California National Guard, he had dreams of trading in his khaki uniform for blue--of serving and protecting instead of learning to kill. Called in to patrol the streets of South Central Los Angeles during the riots, he discovered that safeguarding his city often meant shedding blood. Seventeen years later, Hopkins wears plainclothes. He has everything he had dreamed of as a young soldier: a wife, a family, and a detective's commission. But the city's finest homicide detective is about to be tested. Twenty women are dead, and to find their killer this good cop must learn to think like the madman.

Blood's a Rover

by James Ellroy

America's master of noir delivers his masterpiece, a rip-roaring, devilishly wild ride through the bloody end of the 1960's. It's dark baby, and hot hot hot. Martin Luther King assassinated. Robert Kennedy assassinated. Los Angeles, 1968. Conspiracies theories are taking hold. On the horizon looms the Democratic Convention in Chicago and constant gun fire peppers south L.A. Violence, greed, and grime, are replacing free-love and everybody from Howard Hughes, Richard Nixon and J. Edgar Hoover to the right-wing assassins and left-wing revolutionaries are getting dirty. At the center of it all is a triumvirate: the president's strong-arm goon, an ex-cop and heroine runner, and a private eye whose quarry is so dangerous she could set off the whole powder keg. With his trademark deadly staccato prose, James Ellroy holds nothing back in this wild, startling and much anticipated conclusion to his Underworld USA trilogy. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Brown's Requiem

by James Ellroy

In James Ellroy's first novel, a PI investigates a deadly conspiracy at one of Los Angeles's most exclusive country clubsIt would be a stretch to call Fritz Brown a detective. A PI in name only, he washed out of the police force at twenty-five, and makes a cash living doing under-the-table repo work for a sleazy used-car dealer. It's an ugly job, but Fritz is not one to say no to easy money. That doesn't mean he won't take a case now and then. A caddy visits his office, asking Fritz to dig up dirt on the golf-nut who's dating his sister. Convinced by the caddy's suspiciously fat wad of bills, Fritz agrees to investigate, hoping for a chance to meet the girl. Instead he finds himself embroiled in a tangled world of country club intrigue, where wealth can buy innocence and murder is not half as rare as a hole-in-one.

Clandestine

by James Ellroy

A murder investigation nearly drives a beat cop to madnessDespite the sunshine, high necklines, and demure purity of its silver-screen goddesses, Los Angeles in the 1950s is not a gentle place. Even as a young cop, Freddy Underhill knows this. Patrolling one of L.A.'s roughest districts, he sees the lust, rage, and madness that permeate the city--and stands in wonder and dismay at it all. He covers the beat with his partner Wacky Walker, a World War II veteran with a Medal of Honor, a drinking problem, and a serious obsession with death. When an old flame of Freddy's is murdered, the investigation takes them deep into the shadiest part of the city, where Freddy will have to embrace the darkness if he wants to emerge with his life.

The Cold Six Thousand

by James Ellroy

The Black Dahlia, The Big Nowhere, L.A. Confidential, White Jazz, American Tabloid... James Ellroy's high-velocity, best-selling novels have redefined noir for our age, propelling us within inches of the dark realities of America's recent history. Now, in The Cold Six Thousand, his most ambitious and explosive novel yet, he puts the whole of the 1960s under his blistering lens. The result is a work of fierce, epic fiction, a speedball through our most tumultuous time.It begins in Dallas. November 22, 1963. The heart of the American Dream detonated.Wayne Tedrow Jr., a young Vegas cop, arrives with a loathsome job to do. He's got $6,000 in cash and no idea that he is about to plunge into the cover-up conspiracy already brewing around Kennedy's assassination, no idea that this will mark the beginning of a hellish five-year ride through the private underbelly of public policy.Ellroy's furiously paced narrative tracks Tedrow's ride: Dallas back to Vegas, with the Mob and Howard Hughes, south with the Klan and J. Edgar Hoover, shipping out to Vietnam and returning home, the bearer of white powder, plotting new deaths as 1968 approaches ...Tedrow stands witness, as the icons of an iconic era mingle with cops, killers, hoods, and provocateurs. His story is ground zero in Ellroy's stunning vision: historical confluence as American Nightmare.The Cold Six Thousand is a masterpiece.

Destination: Morgue!

by James Ellroy

Dig. The Demon Dog gets down with a new book of scenes from America's capital of kink: Los Angeles. Fourteen pieces, some fiction, some nonfiction, all true enough to be admissible as state's evidence, and half of it in print for the first time. And every one of them bearing the James Ellroy brand of mayhem, machismo, and hollow-nose prose. Here are Mexican featherweights and unsolved-murder vics, crooked cops and a very clean D.A. Here is a profile of Hollywood's latest celebrity perp-walker, Robert Blake, and three new novellas featuring a demented detective with an obsession with a Hollywood actress. And, oh yes, just maybe the last appearance of Hush-Hush sleaze-monger Danny Getchell. Here's Ellroy himself, shining a 500-watt Mag light into all the dark places of his life and imagination. Destination: Morgue! puts the reader's attention in a hammerlock and refuses to let go.

Hollywood Nocturnes

by James Ellroy

A novella and five short stories from one of the most hard-boiled writers in American crime fictionNobody plays accordion like Dick Contino. His skilled fingers can find beauty in even the schmaltziest borscht belt favorites, and with his matinee-idol looks he could be a real star. Right now, though, he's slumming it as the headliner in a Grade Z teenybopper picture called Daddy-O. He's too good for this movie, and finishing it is going to take him to a very dark place. Daddy-O and Dick Contino are both real, their stories dredged out of the past by James Ellroy, a master of historical crime fiction. In Dick Contino's Blues he takes us to B-List Hollywood in 1957--a time when movies were cheerful and dirty secrets lurked just off camera. Included along with the novella are five short stories, all in the author's inimitable tough-bitten style.

My Dark Places: An L. A. Crime Memoir

by James Ellroy

On 21 June 1958, Geneva Hilliker Ellroy left her home in California. She was found strangled the next day. Her 10-year-old son James had been with her estranged husband all weekend and was informed of her death on his return. Her murderer was never found, but her death had an enduring legacy on her son -- he spent his teen and early adult years as a wino, petty burglar and derelict. Only later, through his obsession with crime fiction, triggered by his mother's murder, did Ellroy begin to delve into his past. Shortly after the publication of his ground-breaking novel WHITE JAZZ, he determined to return to Los Angeles and with the help of veteran detective Bill Stoner, attempt to solve the 38-year-old killing. The result is one of the few classics of crime non-fiction and autobiography to appear in the last few decades; a hypnotic trip to America's underbelly and one man's tortured soul.

Perfidia

by James Ellroy

It is December 6, 1941. America stands at the brink of World War II. Last hopes for peace are shattered when Japanese squadrons bomb Pearl Harbor. Los Angeles has been a haven for loyal Japanese-Americans--but now, war fever and race hate grip the city and the Japanese internment begins. The hellish murder of a Japanese family summons three men and one woman. William H. Parker is a captain on the Los Angeles Police Department. He's superbly gifted, corrosively ambitious, liquored-up, and consumed by dubious ideology. He is bitterly at odds with Sergeant Dudley Smith--Irish émigré, ex-IRA killer, fledgling war profiteer. Hideo Ashida is a police chemist and the only Japanese on the L.A. cop payroll. Kay Lake is a twenty-one-year-old dilettante looking for adventure. The investigation throws them together and rips them apart. The crime becomes a political storm center that brilliantly illuminates these four driven souls--comrades, rivals, lovers, history's pawns. Perfidia is a novel of astonishments. It is World War II as you have never seen it, and Los Angeles as James Ellroy has never written it before. Here, he gives us the party at the edge of the abyss and the precipice of America's ascendance. Perfidia is that moment, spellbindingly captured. It beckons us to solve a great crime that, in its turn, explicates the crime of war itself. It is a great American novel. From the Hardcover edition.

Suicide Hill

by James Ellroy

Forced off the L.A. murder squad, Detective Hopkins goes to work for the FBI on an assignment with deadly consequencesLloyd Hopkins is breaking down. Once the sharpest detective in Los Angeles homicide, the strain of nearly two decades steeped in death has begun to take its toll. His confidence is shot, his self-discipline gone, and he has become prone to fits of uncontrollable sobbing. As his marriage collapses, he forgets how to keep himself disengaged from a case. His habits of sleeping with witnesses, faking evidence, and taking the law into his own hands has disgraced the LAPD, and now Hopkins's superiors are attempting to force him into early retirement. When he refuses, the department puts him out to pasture with a position as a liaison with the FBI bank robbery unit. The post is meant to be low-stress and murder-free, but where Lloyd Hopkins goes, blood always follows . . .

White Jazz

by James Ellroy

Los Angeles, 1958. Killings, beatings, bribes, shakedowns--it's standard procedure for Lieutenant Dave Klein, LAPD. He's a slumlord, a bagman, an enforcer--a power in his own small corner of hell. Then the Feds announce a full-out investigation into local police corruption, and everything goes haywire.Klein's been hung out as bait, "a bad cop to draw the heat," and the heat's coming from all sides: from local politicians, from LAPD brass, from racketeers and drug kingpins--all of them hell-bent on keeping their own secrets hidden. For Klein, "forty-two and going on dead," it's dues time.Klein tells his own story--his voice clipped, sharp, often as brutal as the events he's describing--taking us with him on a journey through a world shaped by monstrous ambition, avarice, and perversion. It's a world he created, but now he'll do anything to get out of it alive. Fierce, riveting, and honed to a razor edge, White Jazz is crime fiction at its most shattering.

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