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1914 - Goodbye to All That

by Jeanette Winterson Colm Toibin Elif Shafak Erwin Mortier Lawinia Greenlaw

In this collection of essays, ten leading writers from different countries consider the conflicts that have informed their own literary lives. 1914-Goodbye to All That borrows its title from Robert Graves's "bitter leave-taking of England" in which he writes not only of the First World War but the questions it raised: how to live, how to live with each other, and how to write. Interpreting this title as broadly and ambiguously as Graves intended, these essays mark the War's centenary by reinvigorating these questions. The book includes Elif Shafak on an inheritance of silence in Turkey, Ali Smith on lost voices in Scotland, Xiaolu Guo on the 100,000 Chinese sent to the Front, Daniel Kehlmann on hypnotism in Berlin, Colm Toibin on Lady Gregory losing her son fighting for Britain as she fought for an independent Ireland, Kamila Shamsie on reimagining Karachi, Erwin Mortier on occupied Belgium's legacy of shame, NoViolet Bulawayo on Zimbabwe and clarity, Ales Steger on resisting history in Slovenia, and Jeanette Winterson on what art is for. Contributors include: Ali Smith - Scotland Ales Steger - Slovenia Jeanette Winterson - England Elif Shafak - Turkey NoViolet Bulawayo - Zimbabwe Colm Toíbín - Ireland Xiaolu Guo - China Erwin Mortier - Belgium Kamila Shamsie - Pakistan Daniel Kehlmann - GermanyFrom the Trade Paperback edition.

Art and Lies

by Jeanette Winterson

One of the most audacious and provocative writers on either side of the Atlantic now gives readers a dazzling, arousing, and wise improvisation on art, Eros, language, and identity. "A series of intense, artful musings that are exhilarating and visionary. . . . Unsettling yet strangely satisfying."--Newsday.From the Trade Paperback edition.

Art & Lies

by Jeanette Winterson

'There is no such thing as autobiography, there is only art and lies'. Set in a London of the near future, its three principal characters, Handel, Picasso and Sappho, separately flee the city and find themselves on the same train, drawn to one another through the curious agency of a book. Stories within stories take us through the unlikely love affairs of one Doll Sneerpiece, an 18th century bawd, and into the world of painful beauty where language has the power to heal. Art & Lies is a question and a quest: How shall I live?From the Trade Paperback edition.

Art Objects

by Jeanette Winterson

In ten interlocking essays, the acclaimed author of Written on the Body and Art & Lies reveals art as an active force in the world--neither elitist nor remote, available to those who want it and affecting those who don't. Original, personal, and provocative, these essays are not so much a point of view as they are a way of life, revealing "a brilliant and deeply feeling artist at work" (San Francisco Chronicle).From the Hardcover edition.

Art Objects: Essays on Ecstasy and Effrontery

by Jeanette Winterson

In these ten intertwined essays, one of our most provocative young novelists proves that she is just as stylish and outrageous an art critic. For when Jeanette Winterson looks at works as diverse as the Mona Lisa and Virginia Woolf's The Waves, she frees them from layers of preconception and restores their power to exalt and unnerve, shock and transform us."Art Objects is a book to be admired for its effort to speak exorbitantly, urgently and sometimes beautifully about art and about our individual and collective need for serious art."--Los Angeles Times

Gut Symmetries

by Jeanette Winterson

Novel exploring a love triangle.

Lighthousekeeping

by Jeanette Winterson

Motherless and anchorless, red-headed Silver is taken in by the timeless Mr. Pew, keeper of the Cape Wrath lighthouse, located at the isolated northwestern tip of Scotland. Pew teaches her to "man the light" but more importantly he tells her ancient tales of longing and rootlessness, of ties that bind and of the slippages that occur throughout every life, not least those of the local inhabitants. One local, Babel Dark, a nineteenth-century clergyman who loved one woman but married another, opens like a map that Silver must follow. Caught in her own particular darknesses, she embarks on an Ulyssean sift through the stories we tell ourselves, stories of love and loss, of passion and regret, stories of unending journeys that move through places and times, and the bleak finality of the shores of betrayal.A story of mutability, of talking birds and stolen books, of Darwin and Stevenson and of the Jekyll and Hyde in all of us, Lighthousekeeping is a way in to the rooms of our own that we secretly inhabit and the lighthouses we strive towards. Jeanette Winterson is one of the most extraordinary and original writers of her generation and this shows her at her lyrical best.From the Hardcover edition.

Lighthousekeeping

by Jeanette Winterson

Lighthousekeeping tells the tale of Silver ("My mother called me Silver. I was born part precious metal, part pirate."), an orphaned girl who is taken in by blind Mr. Pew, the mysterious and miraculously old keeper of a lighthouse on the Scottish coast. Pew tells Silver stories of Babel Dark, a nineteenth-century clergyman. Dark lived two lives: a public one mired in darkness and deceit and a private one bathed in the light of passionate love. For Silver, Dark's life becomes a map through her own darkness, into her own story, and, finally, into love.One of the most original and extraordinary writers of her generation, Jeanette Winterson has created a modern fable about the transformative power of storytelling.

Nightwood

by Jeanette Winterson Djuna Barnes

Nightwood, Djuna Barnes' strange and sinuous tour de force, "belongs to that small class of books that somehow reflect a time or an epoch" (Times Literary Supplement). That time is the period between the two World Wars, and Barnes' novel unfolds in the decadent shadows of Europe's great cities, Paris, Berlin, and Vienna-a world in which the boundaries of class, religion, and sexuality are bold but surprisingly porous. The outsized characters who inhabit this world are some of the most memorable in all of fiction-there is Guido Volkbein, the Wandering Jew and son of a self-proclaimed baron; Robin Vote, the American expatriate who marries him and then engages in a series of affairs, first with Nora Flood and then with Jenny Petherbridge, driving all of her lovers to distraction with her passion for wandering alone in the night; and there is Dr. Matthew-Mighty-Grain-of-Salt-Dante-O'Connor, a transvestite and ostensible gynecologist, whose digressive speeches brim with fury, keen insights, and surprising allusions. Barnes' depiction of these characters and their relationships (Nora says, "A man is another persona woman is yourself, caught as you turn in panic; on her mouth you kiss your own") has made the novel a landmark of feminist and lesbian literature. Most striking of all is Barnes' unparalleled stylistic innovation, which led T. S. Eliot to proclaim the book "so good a novel that only sensibilities trained on poetry can wholly appreciate it. " Now with a new preface by Jeanette Winterson, Nightwood still crackles with the same electric charge it had on its first publication in 1936. Note: Does not use standard American spelling or punctuation.

Nightwood (New Edition)

by T. S. Eliot Jeanette Winterson Djuna Barnes

The fiery and enigmatic masterpiece--one of the greatest novels of the Modernist era. Nightwood, Djuna Barnes' strange and sinuous tour de force, "belongs to that small class of books that somehow reflect a time or an epoch" (Times Literary Supplement). That time is the period between the two World Wars, and Barnes' novel unfolds in the decadent shadows of Europe's great cities, Paris, Berlin, and Vienna--a world in which the boundaries of class, religion, and sexuality are bold but surprisingly porous. The outsized characters who inhabit this world are some of the most memorable in all of fiction--there is Guido Volkbein, the Wandering Jew and son of a self-proclaimed baron; Robin Vote, the American expatriate who marries him and then engages in a series of affairs, first with Nora Flood and then with Jenny Petherbridge, driving all of her lovers to distraction with her passion for wandering alone in the night; and there is Dr. Matthew-Mighty-Grain-of-Salt-Dante-O'Connor, a transvestite and ostensible gynecologist, whose digressive speeches brim with fury, keen insights, and surprising allusions. Barnes' depiction of these characters and their relationships (Nora says, "A man is another persona woman is yourself, caught as you turn in panic; on her mouth you kiss your own") has made the novel a landmark of feminist and lesbian literature. Most striking of all is Barnes' unparalleled stylistic innovation, which led T. S. Eliot to proclaim the book "so good a novel that only sensibilities trained on poetry can wholly appreciate it." Now with a new preface by Jeanette Winterson, Nightwood still crackles with the same electric charge it had on its first publication in 1936.

Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit

by Jeanette Winterson Gary Fisketjon

Winner of the Whitbread Prize for best first fiction, a girl struggles with the conventions of a Pentecostal community in England and her liking of other girls.

The Passion

by Jeanette Winterson

Set during the tumultuous years of the Napoleonic Wars, "The Passion" intertwines the destinies of two remarkable people: Henri, a simple French soldier, and Villanelle, the daughter of a Venetian boatmen, who has lost her heart to a married noblewoman and who wanders the Western world to retrieve it. Note: Does not use standard American spelling or punctuation.

¿Por qué ser feliz cuando puedes ser normal?

by Jeanette Winterson

En 1985, Winterson publicó Fruta prohibida, su primera novela, un relato apenas disimulado sobre su infancia y adolescencia como hija adoptada de un matrimonio muy religioso. Cuenta cómo se enamoró de una mujer y rompió con todos los dogmas de su formación. Cuando finalmente decidió abandonar su casa a los dieciséis años, su madre le preguntó que para qué quería ser feliz cuando podía ser normal. La novela consagró a Winterson como una de las jóvenes voces más brillantes de la literatura británica, y se convirtió en un best seller internacional. Ahora, casi treinta años después, Winterson regresa al problema de su infancia, ya sin las máscaras de la ficción, e indaga en todo lo que significó la vida de esa niña aterrorizada por una madre atroz que guardaba un revólver en la mesilla de noche.

The PowerBook

by Jeanette Winterson

With the same attention to the intricacies of love and language that has distinguished her body of work so far, Jeanette Winterson's The PowerBook unleashes a swirling narrative that uses timeless tales of passion as a springboard for a meditation on love and desire in the age of the Internet. Ali writes stories on e-mail for anyone who wants them. And while she promises freedom from who you are-"freedom just for one night"-she does not do so without a warning: the story might change you. Ask for an epic love story and you will get one, but Ali will be cast in it, too, and the lines between the real and the imagined may blur. Plucking characters from history and myth, as well as her imagination, Ali journeys through time and makes stops in London, Paris, and Capri, all the while weaving stories that question the boundaries of cyberspace, the human heart, and the novel. In The PowerBook Winterson has found a brilliant conceit through which to showcase her increasingly bold, and utterly unique, voice. From the Book Jacket

The Stone Gods

by Jeanette Winterson Bill Clegg

On the airwaves, all the talk is of the new blue planet - pristine and habitable, like our own was 65 million years ago, before we took it to the edge of destruction. Off the air, Billie Crusoe and the renegade robo-sapian Spike are falling in love. Along with Captain Handsome and Pink, they're assigned to colonize the new blue planet. But when a technical maneuver intended to make it inhabitable backfires, Billie and Spike's flight to the future becomes a surprising return to the distant past -- "Everything is imprinted forever with what it once was." What will happen when their story combines with the world's story? Will they -- and we -- ever find a safe landing place?Playful, passionate, polemical, and frequently very funny, The Stone Gods will change forever the stories we tell about the earth, about love, and about stories themselves.

Tanglewreck

by Jeanette Winterson

Ages 9 and up. Something frightening is happening with time. One moment, a time tornado rages through the streets of London, and those caught up in its path vanish without a trace. The next moment a woolly mammoth is seen lumbering along the banks of the River Thames. At the center of these bizarre time warps is a house called Tanglewreck, which is home to eleven-year-old Silver, her bony and bad-tempered aunt, Mrs Rokabye, and a mysterious clock known as the Timekeeper. When the Timekeeper disappears, Silver embarks on a perilous quest with her friend Gabriel to search for the clock before it falls into the wrong hands--and before time as we know it comes to an end. A Book Sense Children's Pick

Weight

by Jeanette Winterson

The story of Atlas and Heracles. Atlas knows how it feels to carry the weight of the world; but why, he asks himself, does it have to be carried at all? In Weight -- visionary and inventive, yet completely believable and relevant to the questions we ask ourselves every day -- Winterson's skill in turning the familiar on its head to show us a different truth is put to stunning effect.When I was asked to choose a myth to write about, I realized I had chosen already. The story of Atlas holding up the world was in my mind before the telephone call had ended. If the call had not come, perhaps I would never have written the story, but when the call did come, that story was waiting to be written. Rewritten. The recurring language motif of Weight is "I want to tell the story again."My work is full of Cover Versions. I like to take stories we think we know and record them differently. In the retelling comes a new emphasis or bias, and the new arrangement of the key elements demands that fresh material be injected into the existing text.Weight moves far away from the simple story of Atlas's punishment and his temporary relief when Hercules takes the world off his shoulders. I wanted to explore loneliness, isolation, responsibility, burden, and freedom too, because my version has a very particular end not found elsewhere.--from Jeanette Winterson's Foreword to Weight.

Weight

by Jeanette Winterson

With wit and verve, the prize-winning author of Sexing the Cherry and Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit brings the mythical figure of Atlas into the space age and sets him free at last. In her retelling of the story of a god tricked into holding the world on his shoulders and his brief reprieve, she sets difficult questions about the nature of choice and coercion, how we choose our own destiny and at the same time can liberate ourselves from our seeming fate. Finally in paperback, Weight is a daring, seductive addition to Canongate's ambitious series of myths by the world's most acclaimed authors.

Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal?

by Jeanette Winterson

Heartbreaking and funny: the true story behind Jeanette's bestselling and most beloved novel, Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit. In 1985, at twenty-five, Jeanette published Oranges, the story of a girl adopted by Pentecostal parents, supposed to grow up to be a missionary. Instead, she falls in love with a woman. Disaster. Oranges became an international bestseller, inspired an award-winning BBC adaptation, and was semi-autobiographical. Mrs. Winterson, a thwarted giantess, loomed over the novel and the author's life: when Jeanette left home at sixteen because she was in love with a woman, Mrs. Winterson asked her: Why be happy when you could be normal? This is Jeanette's story--acute, fierce, celebratory--of a life's work to find happiness: a search for belonging, love, identity, a home. About a young girl locked out of her home, sitting on the doorstep all night, and a mother waiting for Armageddon with two sets of false teeth and a revolver in the duster drawer; about growing up in a northern industrial town; about the Universe as a Cosmic Dustbin. She thought she had written over the painful past until it returned to haunt her and sent her on a journey into madness and out again, in search of her biological mother. It is also about other people's stories, showing how fiction and poetry can form a string of guiding lights, a life raft that supports us when we are sinking.

The World and Other Places

by Jeanette Winterson

Short stories.

The World Split Open: Great Authors on How and Why We Write

by Margaret Atwood Ursula K. Le Guin Jeanette Winterson Robert Stone Wallace Stegner Russell Banks Marilynne Robinson

Since 1984, Literary Arts has welcomed many of the world's most renowned authors and storytellers to its stage. In celebration of their thirty-year anniversary, Tin House Books has collected highlights from the series in a single volume. Since 1984, Literary Arts has welcomed many of the world's most renowned authors and storytellers to its stage for one of the country's largest lectures series. Sold-out crowds congregate at Portland's Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall to hear these writers' discuss their work and their thoughts on the trajectory of contemporary literature and culture. In celebration of Literary Arts' thirty-year anniversary, Tin House Books has collected highlights from the series in a single volume. Whether it's Wallace Stegner exploring how we use fiction to make sense of life or Ursula K. Le Guin on where ideas come from, Margaret Atwood on the need for complex female characters or Robert Stone on morality and truth in literature, Edward P. Jones on the role of imagination in historical novels or Marilynne Robinson on the nature of beauty, these essays illuminate not just the world of letters but the world at large.

Written on the Body

by Jeanette Winterson

The narrator, who falls in and out of love, is hopelessly smitten with a married woman named Louise. But the beautiful Louise has leukemia. A work of literature concerning romance and love, by an award-winning British lesbian writer

Showing 1 through 22 of 22 results

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