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Displaced Persons

by Joseph Berger

In this touching account, veteran New York Times reporter Joseph Berger describes how his own family of Polish Jews -- with one son born at the close of World War II and the other in a "displaced persons" camp outside Berlin -- managed against all odds to make a life for themselves in the utterly foreign landscape of post-World War II America. Paying eloquent homage to his parents' extraordinary courage, luck, and hard work while illuminating as never before the experience of 140,000 refugees who came to the United States between 1947 and 1953, Joseph Berger has captured a defining moment in history in a riveting and deeply personal chronicle.

The Pious Ones

by Joseph Berger

Veteran New York Times journalist Joseph Berger takes us inside the fascinating, insular world of the Hasidim to explore their origins, beliefs, and struggles.Though the Hasidic way of life was nearly extinguished in the Holocaust, today the Hasidim--"the pious ones"--have become one of the most prominent religious subcultures in America. In The Pious Ones, New York Times journalist Joseph Berger traces their origins in eighteenth-century Eastern Europe, illuminating their dynamics and core beliefs, which remain enigmatic to outsiders. He analyzes the Hasidim's codified lifestyle, revealing its fascinating secrets, complexities, and paradoxes, and provides a nuanced and insightful portrayal of how their all-encompassing faith dictates nearly every aspect of life--including work, education, food, sex, clothing, and social relations--and helps them to sustain a sense of connection and purpose in a changing world.From the intense sectarian politics to the conflicts that arise over housing, transportation, schooling, and gender roles, The Pious Ones chronicles the ways in which the fabric of Hasidic existence is threatened by both exposure to the wider world and internal fissures within its growing population. What lies ahead for the Hasidim, and what lies ahead for American culture and politics as these ultra-Orthodox Jews occupy a greater place in our society?

The World in a City: Traveling the Globe Through the Neighborhoods of the New New York

by Joseph Berger

Fifty years ago, New York City had only a handful of ethnic groups. Today, the whole world can be found within the city's five boroughs-and celebrated New York Times reporter Joseph Berger sets out to discover it, bringing alive the sights, smells, tastes, and people of the globe while taking readers on an intimate tour of the world's most cosmopolitan city. For urban enthusiasts and armchair explorers alike, The World in a City is a look at today's polyglot and polychrome, cosmopolitan and culturally rich New York and the lessons it holds for the rest of the United States as immigration changes the face of the nation. With three out of five of the city's residents either foreign-born or second-generation Americans, New York has become more than ever a collection of villages-virtually self-reliant hamlets, each exquisitely textured by its particular ethnicities, history, and politics. For the price of a subway ride, you can visit Ghana, the Philippines, Ecuador, Uzbekistan, and Bangladesh. As Berger shows us in this absorbing and enlightening tour, New York is an endlessly fascinating crossroads. Naturally, tears exist in this colorful social fabric: the controversy over Korean-language shop signs in tony Douglaston, Queens; the uneasy proximity of traditional cottages and new McMansions built by recently arrived Russian residents of Manhattan Beach, Brooklyn. Yet in spite of the tensions among neighbors, what Berger has found most miraculous about New York is how the city and its more than eight million denizens can adapt to-and even embrace-change like no other place on earth, from the former pushcart knish vendor on the Lower East Side who now caters to his customers via the Internet, to the recent émigrés from former Soviet republics to Brooklyn's Brighton Beach and Midwood whose arrival saved New York's furrier trade from certain extinction. Like the place it chronicles, The World in a City is an engaging hybrid. Blending elements of sociology, pop culture, and travel writing, this is the rare book that enlightens readers while imbuing them with the hope that even in this increasingly fractious and polarized world, we can indeed co-exist in harmony. From the Hardcover edition.

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