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Amerika

by Franz Kafka

Translated by Willa and Edwin MuirForeword by E. L. DoctorowAfterword by Max Brod Kafka's first and funniest novel, Amerika tells the story of the young immigrant Karl Rossmann who, after an embarrassing sexual misadventure, finds himself "packed off to America" by his parents. Expected to redeem himself in this magical land of opportunity, young Karl is swept up instead in a whirlwind of dizzying reversals, strange escapades, and picaresque adventures. Although Kafka never visited America, images of its vast landscape, dangers, and opportunities inspired this saga of the "golden land." Here is a startlingly modern, fantastic and visionary tale of America "as a place no one has yet seen, in a historical period that can't be identified," writes E. L. Doctorow in his new foreword. "Kafka made his novel from his own mind's mythic elements," Doctorow explains, "and the research data that caught his eye were bent like rays in a field of gravity."

Amerika: The Missing Person

by Franz Kafka

Franz Kafka's diaries and letters suggest that his fascination with America grew out of a desire to break away from his native Prague, even if only in his imagination. Kafka died before he could finish what he like to call his "American novel,: but he clearly entitled itDer Verschollene("The Missing Person") in a letter to his fiancee, Felice Bauer, in 1912. Kafka began writing the novel that fall and wrote until the last completed chapter in 1914, but in wasn't until 1927, three years after his death, thatAmerika--the title that Kafka's friend and literary executor Max Brod gave his edited version of the unfinished manuscript--was published in Germany by Kurt Wolff Verlag. An English translation by Willa and Edwin Muir was published in Great Britain in 1932 and in the United States in 1946. Over the last thirty years, an international team of Kafka scholars has been working on German-language critical editions of all of Kafka's writings, going back to the original manuscripts and notes, correcting transcription errors, and removing Brod's editorial and stylistic interventions to create texts that are as close as possible to the way the author left them. With the same expert balance of precision and nuance that marked his award-winning translation ofThe Castle,Mark Harman now restores the humor ad particularity of language in his translation of the critical edition ofDer Verschollene. Here is the story of young Karl Rossman, who, following an incident involving a housemaid, is banished by his parents to America. With unquenchable optimism and in the company of two comic-sinister companions, he throws himself into misadventure, eventually heading towards Oklahoma, where a career in the theater beckons. Though we can never know how Kafka planned to end the novel, Harman's superb translation allows us to appreciate, as closely as possible, what Kafka did commit to the page. From the Hardcover edition.

The Big Bug

by Franz Kafka Michael Leviton

Gregor Samsa wakes up one morning to find he has been transformed into a bug.

The Blue Octavo Notebooks

by Franz Kafka Ernst Kaiser Eithne Wilkins Max Brod

From late 1917 until June 1919, Franz Kafka stopped writing entries in his diary, which he kept in quarto-sized notebooks, but continued to write in a series of smaller, octavo-sized notebooks. When Kafka's literary executor, Max Brod, published the diaries in 1948, he omitted these notebooks--which include short stories, fragments of stories, and other literary writings--because, "Notations of a diary nature, dates, are found in them only as a rare exception." The Blue Octavo Notebooks have thus remained little known yet are among the most characteristic of Kafka's work. In addition to otherwise unpublished material, the notebooks contain some of Kafka's most famous aphorisms in their original context. This edition of the English translation has been corrected with reference to the German text for certain omissions and discrepancies of sequence.

El castillo

by Franz Kafka

Franz Kafka (1883-1924) comienza a escribir EL CASTILLO muy probablemente en enero de 1922; en septiembre de ese mismo año abandona el manuscrito, editado poco después de su muerte por Max Brod. En la novela son facilmente perceptibles los elementos autobiográficos, y reconocible la localización geográfica; según muchos críticos, es el proyecto literario más ambicioso y logrado de Kafka. El agrimensor K. acude a una aldea, cuya vida gira por entero en torno al castillo que la gobierna, a fin de incorporarse a un trabajo para el que cree ha sido llamado; todo el relato ocupa la historia de sus inútiles esfuerzos para aclarar su situación y romper el círculo de soledad que le rodea. El clima y la idea dramática son análogos a los que informan "La metamorfosis", "El proceso" y, en general, su obra entera: un mundo exterior que pese a conservar todas las notas que lo hacen fisonómicamente reconocible y familiar, es objeto de una misteriosa mutación que la transforma cualitativamente; una secuencia de acontecimientos incomprensibles para quien la padece pero que esconde tras la aparente arbitrariedad de su movimiento una necesidad ineluctable; la inoperancia de la voluntad y el entendimiento humanos para comprender ese medio hostil y doblegarlo.

The Castle

by Franz Kafka

Franz Kafka's final novel tells the haunting tale of a man known only as K. and of his relentless, unavailing struggle with an inscrutable authority in order to gain entrance to the Castle. Although Kafka seemed to consider The Castle a failure, critics, in wrestling with its enigmatic meaning, have recognized it as one of the great novels of our century. Unfinished at Kafka's death in 1924, the manuscript of The Castle was edited for publication by Kafka's friend and literary executor, Max Brod. Both Brod's edition and the English-language translation of it that was prepared by Willa and Edwin Muir in 1930 have long been considered flawed.This new edition of Kafka's terrifying and comic masterpiece is the product of an international team of experts who went back to Kafka's original manuscript and notes to create an edition that is as close as possible to the way the author left it. The Times Literary Supplement hailed their work, saying that it will "decisively alter our understanding of Kafka and render previous editions obsolete."Mark Harman's brilliant translation closely follows the fluidity and breathlessness of the sparsely punctuated original manuscript, revealing levels of comedy, energy, and visual power that have not been previously accessible to English-language readers.W. H. Auden likened Kafka to Dante, Shakespeare, and Goethe as the single most important writer of his age. Here, in this new edition, is a Kafka for the twenty-first century.

The Castle

by Franz Kafka Willa Muir Edwin Muir

Arriving in a village to take up the position of land surveyor for the mysterious lord of a castle, the character known as K. finds himself in a bitter and baffling struggle to contact his new employer and go about his duties. As the villagers and the Castle officials block his efforts at every turn, K.' s consuming quest-- quite possibly a self-imposed one-- to penetrate the inaccessible heart of the Castle and take its measure is repeatedly frustrated. Kafka once suggested that the would-be surveyor in "The Castle" is driven by a wish "to get clear about ultimate things," an unrealizable desire that provided the driving force behind all of Kafka's dazzlingly uncanny fictions.

The Complete Stories

by Franz Kafka

The Complete Stories brings together all of Kafka's stories, from the classic tales such as "The Metamorphosis," "In the Penal Colony," and "A Hunger Artist" to shorter pieces and fragments that Max Brod, Kafka's literary executor, released after Kafka's death. With the exception of his three novels, the whole of Kafka's narrative work is included in this volume.

Diaries, 1910-1923

by Franz Kafka

These diaries cover the years 1910 to 1923, the year before Kafka's death at the age of forty. They provide a penetrating look into life in Prague and into Kafka's accounts of his dreams, his feelings for the father he worshipped and the woman he could not bring himself to marry, his sense of guilt, and his feelings of being an outcast. They offer an account of a life of almost unbearable intensity.From the Trade Paperback edition.ruggles and triumphs in expressing himself as a writer.Now, for the first time in this country, the complete diaries of Franz Kafka are available in one volume. They are not only indispensable to an understanding of Kafka the man and the artist, but are a compulsively readable, haunting account of a life of almost unbearable intensity.From the Trade Paperback edition.

I Am a Memory Come Alive: Autobiographical Writings

by Franz Kafka

Autobiography of the noted author.

Letter to his Father

by Franz Kafka

Franz Kafka wrote this letter to Hermann Kafka in November 1919; he was then thirty-six years old. Max Brod relates that Kafka actually gave it to his mother to hand to his father, hoping that it might renew a relationship that had disintegrated into tension and frustration on both sides. Kafka's probing of the abyss between them spared neither his father nor himself, and his cry for acceptance has an undertone of despair. He could not help seeing the lack of understanding between father and son as another moment in the universal predicament depicited in so much of his work. Probably realizing the futility of her son's gesture, his mother did not deliver the letter, but returned it to Kafka instead. Kafka died five years later, in 1924, of tuberculosis.

Letter to My Father

by Franz Kafka Howard Colyer

This letter is the closest that Kafka came to setting down his autobiography. He was driven to write it by his father's opposition to his engagement with Julie Wohryzek. The marriage did not take place; the letter was not delivered.

Letters to Felice

by Franz Kafka

Franz Kafka first met Felice Bauer in August 1912, at the home of his friend Max Brod. The twenty-five-year-old career woman from Berlin--energetic, down-to-earth, life-affirming--awakened in him a desire to marry. Kafka wrote to Felice almost daily, sometimes even twice a day. Because he was living in Prague and she in Berlin, their letters became their sole source of knowledge of each other. But soon after their engagement in 1914, Kafka began having doubts about the relationship, fearing that marriage would imperil his dedication to writing and interfere with his need for solitude. Through their break-up, a second engagement in 1917, and their final parting later that year, when Kafka began falling ill with the tuberculosis that would eventually claim his life, their correspondence continued. The more than five hundred letters that Kafka wrote to Felice over the course of those five years were acquired by Schocken from her in 1955. They reveal the full measure of Kafka's inner turmoil as he tried, in vain, to balance his need for stability with the demands of his craft."These letters are indispensable for anyone seeking a more intimate knowledge of Kafka and his fragmented world."--Library Journal

Letters to Friends, Family and Editors

by Franz Kafka

"These magnificent letters, meticulously set up and annotated, show us aspects of Kafka that were only hinted at in earlier collections and help us trace his development from unhappy young law student and insurance administrator to novelist and short-story writer of originality and genius."--Publishers Weekly"When we turn from Kafka's books to his letters we have a series of self-portraits desperate and courageous, always eager and warm in feeling; the self is lit by fantasy and, of course, by drollery. His candor is of the kind that flies alongside him in the air. He was a marvelous letter writer."--V.S. Pritchett, The New York Review of Books"These letters are like messages from the underground, from the dark side of the moon, presenting aspects of Kafka that would have died with his friends. We meet alternately Kafka the artist, friend, son, father figure, marriage counselor, literary critic, insurance official. . . . A full portrait, and a significant contribution to Kafka scholarship."--Smithsonian Magazine"An inside view of a writer who, perhaps more than any other novelist or poet in our century, stands at the center of our culture."--Robert Alter, The New York Times Book Review

Letters to Milena

by Franz Kafka

In no other work does Franz Kafka reeal himself as in Letters to Milena, which begins as a business correspondence but soon develops into a passionate but doomed epistolary love affair. Kafka's Czech translator, Milena Jesenska was a gifted and charismatic twenty-three-year-old who was uniquely able to recognize Kafka's complex genius and his even more complex character. For the thrity-six-year-old Kafka, she was "a living fire, such as I have never seen." It was to Milena that he revealed his most intimate self and, eventually, entrusted his diaries for safekeeping."The voice of Kafka in Letters to Milena is more personal, more pure, and more painful than in his fiction: a testimony to human existence and to our eternal wait for the impossible. A marvelous new edition of a classic text."--Jan Kott

Letters to Milena

by Franz Kafka Philip Boehm

Kafka's terrible illness was progressing. He was a man who needed so much time, and who had so painfully little. Kafka lived his whole life as few do; these letters are a testimony to his intense vitality and to his genius as a writer.

Letters to Ottla and the Family

by Franz Kafka

Written by Kafka between 1909 and 1924, these letters offer a unique insight into the workings of the Kafka family, their relationship with the Prague Jewish community, and Kafka's own feelings about his parents and siblings. A gracious but shy woman, and a silent rebel against the bourgeois society in which she lived, Ottla Kafka was the sibling to whom Kafka felt closest. He had a special affection for her simplicity, her integrity, her ability to listen, and her pride in his work. Ottla was deported to Theresienstadt during World War II, and volunteered to accompany a transport of children to Auschwitz in 1943. She did not survive the war, but her husband and daughters did, and preserved her brother's letters to her. They were published in the original German in 1974, and in English in 1982."Kafka's touching letters to his sister, when she was a child and as a young married woman, are beautifully simple, tender, and fresh. In them one sees the side of his nature that was not estranged. It is lucky they have been preserved."--V. S. Pritchett, The New York Review of Books

The Meowmorphosis

by Franz Kafka Cook Coleridge

"One morning, as Gregor Samsa was waking up from anxious dreams, he discovered that he had been changed into an adorable kitten."Thus begins The Meowmorphosis--a bold, startling, and fuzzy-wuzzy new edition of Kafka's classic nightmare tale, from the publishers of Pride and Prejudice and Zombies! Meet Gregor Samsa, a humble young man who works as a fabric salesman to support his parents and sister. His life goes strangely awry when he wakes up late for work and discovers that, inexplicably, he is now a man-sized baby kitten. His family freaks out: Yes, their son is OMG so cute, but what good is cute when there are bills to pay? And how can Gregor be so selfish as to devote all his attention to a scrap of ribbon? As his new feline identity threatens to eat away at his personality, Gregor desperately tries to survive this bizarre, bewhiskered ordeal by accomplishing the one thing he never could as a man: He must flee his parents' house.funny.

La metamorfosis

by Franz Kafka

Una mañana, al despertar, Gregorio Samsa descubre que se ha convertido en un enorme insecto. Esta obra es una muestra representativa del estilo lúcido e irónico de Kafka, que mezcla con naturalidad realidad y fantasía, y nos sumerge en un clima claustrofóbico, fantasmal y dramatico. Relato breve e intenso, de fácil y rápida lectura, que hace al lector ponerse en una situación muy compleja al plantearse el interrogante...¿Y si me pasara mañana esto a mi?

The Metamorphosis

by Franz Kafka

This collection brings together the stories that Kafka allowed to be published during his lifetime. To Max Brod, his literary executor, he wrote: "Of all my writings the only books that can stand are these." (From the Trade Paperback edition.) [This text is listed as an example that meets Common Core Standards in English language arts in grades 6-8 at http://www.corestandards.org.]

The Metamorphosis

by Franz Kafka Stanley Corngold

The Metamorphosis is the story of a young man who, transformed overnight into a giant beetlelike insect, becomes an object of disgrace to his family, an outsider in his own home, a quintessentially alienated man. [This text is listed as an example that meets Common Core Standards in English language arts in grades 9-10 at http://www.corestandards.org.]

The Metamorphosis

by Peter Kuper Franz Kafka

A brilliant, darkly comic reimagining of Kafka's classic tale of family, alienation, and a giant bug.Acclaimed graphic artist Peter Kuper presents a kinetic illustrated adaptation of Franz Kafka's The Metamorphosis. Kuper's electric drawings--where American cartooning meets German expressionism--bring Kafka's prose to vivid life, reviving the original story's humor and poignancy in a way that will surprise and delight readers of Kafka and graphic novels alike.From the Hardcover edition.

The Metamorphosis and Other Stories

by Franz Kafka

The Metamorphosis is the story of a young man who, transformed overnight into a giant beetlelike insect, becomes an object of disgrace to his family, an outsider in his own home, a quintessentially alienated man. [This text is listed as an example that meets Common Core Standards in English language arts in grades 9-10 at http://www.corestandards.org.]

Metamorphosis, In The Penal Colony and Other Stories

by Franz Kafka Joachim Neugroschel

Translated by PEN translation award-winner Joachim Neugroschel, The Metamorphosis, In the Penal Colony, and Other Stories has garnered critical acclaim and is widely recognized as the preeminent English-language anthology of Kafka's stories. These translations illuminate one of this century's most controversial writers and have made Kafka's work accessible to a whole new generation. This classic collection of forty-one great short works -- including such timeless pieces of modern fiction as "The Judgment" and "The Stoker" -- now includes two new stories, "First Sorrow" and "The Hunger Artist."

El proceso

by Franz Kafka

La novela fue escrita en 1914, pero recién fue publicada póstumamente por Max Brod, amigo y albacea de Kafka. Junto con América y El Castillo, El Proceso conforma la que se conoce como la trilogía de la soledad. Sus personajes están caracterizados por una creciente despersonalización (hasta el punto que en El Castillo al protagonista se lo designa tan sólo con una inicial). A la pérdida del nombre se suma la pérdida de los distintos protagonistas en un mundo absurdo que los devora. El Proceso cuenta la historia de Josef K, un empleado de un banco que un día es detenido y procesado sin que se sepa por qué. K busca un abogado, intenta informarse acerca del estado de su proceso y se topa con reglamentos, leyes incomprensibles y jerarquías infinitas dentro de la estructura de la justicia, sin encontrar nunca al juez encargado de instruir su proceso. Finalmente, la sentencia se cumple sin que el acusado - ni el lector - se enteren jamás por qué se lo condena. Si bien se analiza a la obra como una crítica a los regímenes autoritarios, también hay en ella una parodia de la burocracia, así como una constante sensación de irrealidad resaltada por los diálogos absurdos y por elementos que parecen extraídos de un sueño (corredores en los que Josef K deambula, puertas que se abren y llevan a oficinas de la justicia en lugares inverosímiles, empleados durmiendo en los pasillos, súbitos malestares inexplicables que sufre el protagonista). Las temáticas más características en la obra de Kafka están presentes en El Proceso. La burocracia, el tema de la Ley (que lleva implícita la figura del padre), el aislamiento y la imposibilidad de comunicarse, la soledad del individuo, el clima onírico y de pesadilla que domina la novela, todos elementos que conforman esta obra.

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