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Aloysha the Pot

by Leo Tolstoy

A short story from the Classic Shorts collection: Family Happiness by Leo Tolstoy

Android Karenina

by Constance Garnett Leo Tolstoy Eugene Smith Ben Winters

It's been called the greatest novel ever written. Now, Tolstoy's timeless saga of love and betrayal is transported to an awesomer version of 19th-century Russia. It is a world humming with high-powered groznium engines: where debutantes dance the 3D waltz in midair, mechanical wolves charge into battle alongside brave young soldiers, and robots--miraculous, beloved robots!--are the faithful companions of everyone who's anyone. Restless to forge her own destiny in this fantastic modern life, the bold noblewoman Anna and her enigmatic Android Karenina abandon a loveless marriage to seize passion with the daring, handsome Count Vronsky. But when their scandalous affair gets mixed up with dangerous futuristic villainy, the ensuing chaos threatens to rip apart their lives, their families, and--just maybe--all of planet Earth.From the Trade Paperback edition.

Android Karenina

by Leo Tolstoy Ben H. Winters

"Sense and Sensibility and Sea Monsters" co-author Winters is back with an all-new collaborator, legendary Russian novelist Tolstoy, and the result is an enhanced edition of the classic love story set in a dystopian world of robots, cyborgs, and interstellar space travel.

Anna Karenina

by Constance Garnett Leo Tolstoy

First published in the late 19th century, Anna Karenina, by famed Russian writer Leo Tolstoy, is widely regarded as one of the greatest novels of all time. Chronicling the turbulent affair between Anna Karenina and Count Vronsky, Tolstoy weaves a parallel plot of self-discovery and a turn to religion by character Konstantin Levin that is thought to be autobiographical. The result is a tale of jealousy, faith, hypocrisy, passion and progress set amidst the social change occurring in Russia in the 1870s. Now available as part of the Word Cloud Classics series, the novel is a must-have addition to the libraries of all classic literature lovers.

Anna Karenina

by Leo Tolstoy

This is an OCR edition without illustrations or index. It may have numerous typos or missing text. However, purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original rare book from GeneralBooksClub. com. You can also preview excerpts from the book there. Purchasers are also entitled to a free trial membership in the General Books Club where they can select from more than a million books without charge. Volume: 1; Original Published by: New York: T. Y. Crowell in 1886 in 400 pages; Subjects: Fiction / Classics; Fiction / Literary; Literary Criticism / Russian

Anna Karenina

by Leo Tolstoy

This edition, the famous Constance Garnett translation, has been revised throughout by Leonard J. Kent and Nina Berberova."Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way." So begins Anna Karenina, Leo Tolstoy's great modern novel of an adulterous affair set against the backdrop of Moscow and St. Petersburg high society in the later half of the nineteenth century. A sophisticated woman who is respectably married to a government bureaucrat, Anna begins a passionate, all-consuming involvement with a rich army officer. Refusing to conduct a discreet affair, she scandalizes society by abandoning both her husband and her young son for Count Vronsky--with tragic consequences. Running parallel is the story of the courtship and marriage of Konstantin Levin (the melancholy nobleman who is Tolstoy's stand-in) and Princess Kitty Shcherbatsky. Levin's spiritual searching and growth reflect the religious ideals that at the time Tolstoy was evolving for himself. Taken together, the two plots embroider a vast canvas that ultimately encompasses all levels of Russian society. "Now and then Tolstoy's novel writes its own self, is produced by its matter, but its subject," noted Vladimir Nabokov. "Anna Karenina is one of the greatest love stories in world literature." As Matthew Arnold wrote in his celebrated essay on Tolstoy: "We are not to take Anna Karenina as a work of art; we are to take it as a piece of life." From the Hardcover edition.

Anna Karenina

by Leo Tolstoy Marian Schwartz Gary Saul Morson

This edition, the famous Constance Garnett translation, has been revised throughout by Leonard J. Kent and Nina Berberova. Happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way. So begins Anna Karenina, Leo Tolstoy's great modern novel of an adulterous affair set against the backdrop of Moscow and St. Petersburg high society in the later half of the nineteenth century. A sophisticated woman who is respectably married to a government bureaucrat, Anna begins a passionate, all-consuming involvement with a rich army officer. Refusing to conduct a discreet affair, she scandalizes society by abandoning both her husband and her young son for Count Vronsky--with tragic consequences. Running parallel is the story of the courtship and marriage of Konstantin Levin (the melancholy nobleman who is Tolstoy's stand-in) and Princess Kitty Shcherbatsky. Levin's spiritual searching and growth reflect the religious ideals that at the time Tolstoy was evolving for himself. Taken together, the two plots embroider a vast canvas that ultimately encompasses all levels of Russian society. Now and then Tolstoy's novel writes its own self, is produced by its matter, but its subject, noted Vladimir Nabokov. Anna Karenina is one of the greatest love stories in world literature. As Matthew Arnold wrote in his celebrated essay on Tolstoy: We are not to take Anna Karenina as a work of art; we are to take it as a piece of life. "From the Hardcover edition. "

Anna Karenina (Movie Tie-in Edition)

by Leo Tolstoy Louise Maude Alymer Maude

The official movie tie-in to the major motion picture starring Keira Knightly, Jude Law, Aaron Johnson, directed by Joe Wright, including a screenplay by Tom Stoppard.Leo Tolstoy's classic story of doomed love is one of the most admired novels in world literature. Generations of readers have been enthralled by his magnificent heroine, the unhappily married Anna Karenina, and her tragic affair with dashing Count Vronsky.In their world frivolous liaisons are commonplace, but Anna and Vronsky's consuming passion makes them a target for scorn and leads to Anna's increasing isolation. The heartbreaking trajectory of their relationship contrasts sharply with the colorful swirl of friends and family members who surround them, especially the newlyweds Kitty and Levin, who forge a touching bond as they struggle to make a life together. Anna Karenina is a masterpiece not only because of the unforgettable woman at its core and the stark drama of her fate, but also because it explores and illuminates the deepest questions about how to live a fulfilled life. Translated by Louise and Aylmer Maude

Anna Karenina (Oprah #5)

by Leo Tolstoy Richard Pevear Translator Lari Volokhonsky

Anna Karenina tells of the doomed love affair between the sensuous and rebellious Anna and the dashing officer, Count Vronsky. Tragedy unfolds as Anna rejects her passionless marriage and must endure the hypocrisies of society. Set against a vast and richly textured canvas of nineteenth-century Russia, the novel's seven major characters create a dynamic imbalance, playing out the contrasts of city and country life and all the variations on love and family happiness. While previous versions have softened the robust, and sometimes shocking, quality of Tolstoy's writing, Pevear and Volokhonsky have produced a translation true to his powerful voice. This award-winning team's authoritative edition also includes an illuminating introduction and explanatory notes. Beautiful, vigorous, and eminently readable, this Anna Karenina will be the definitive text for generations to come.

A Calendar of Wisdom: Daily Thoughts to Nourish the Soul

by Leo Tolstoy

This is the first-ever English-language edition of the book Leo Tolstoy considered to be his most important contribution to humanity, the work of his life's last years. Widely read in pre-revolutionary Russia, banned and forgotten under Communism; and recently rediscovered to great excitement, A Calendar of Wisdom is a day-by-day guide that illuminates the path of a life worth living with a brightness undimmed by time. Unjustly censored for nearly a century, it deserves to be placed with the few books in our history that will never cease teaching us the essence of what is important in this world.

Collected Shorter Fiction, vol. 2

by Leo Tolstoy

(Book Jacket Status: Not Jacketed)The only comprehensive hardcover edition of Tolstoy's shorter fiction--57 stories and novellas, including two that have never before appeared in English.In these two handsome volumes, every aspect of Tolstoy's art and personality is reflected: his experiences as a soldier in the Caucasus, his married life, his passionate interest in the peasantry, his belief in truth and simplicity, and above all, his growing preoccupation with religion. Ranging in scope from the short novels Hadj Murad and The Kreutzer Sonata to folktales only a few pages long, they bring us intimately into the world of the great Russian novelist.

Confession

by Leo Tolstoy

Account of Tolstoy's midlife crisis

The Cossacks

by Leo Tolstoy

"Tolstoy's lavish and always graphic use of detail," wrote John Bayley, "together of course with its romance and exotic setting ... has made The Cossacks the most popular of all his works." This vibrant new translation of Tolstoy's 1862 novel, by PEN Translation Award winner Peter Constantine, is the author's semi-autobiographical depiction of young Olenin, a wealthy, disaffected Muscovite, who joins the Russian army and travels to the untamed frontier of the Caucasus in search of a more authentic life. Quartered with his regiment in a Cossack village, Olenin revels in the glories of nature and the rough strength of the Cossacks and Chechens. Smitten by his unrequited love for a local girl, Maryanka, Olenin has a profound but ultimately short-lived spiritual awakening. Try as he might to assimilate, he remains an awkward outsider and his long search for a more enlightened and purposeful existence comes to naught. With the philosophical insight that would characterize Tolstoy's later masterpieces, this long overdue major new translation is a revelation.

The Death of Ivan Ilych

by Leo Tolstoy Ian Dreiblatt

Too short to be a novel, too long to be a short story, the novella is generally unrecognized by academics and publishers. Nonetheless, it is a form beloved and practiced by literature's greatest writers. In ART OF THE NOVELLA series, Melville House celebrates this renegade art form and its practitioners with titles that are, in many instances, presented in book form for the first time.Written eight years after the publication of Anna Karenina--a time during which, despite the global success of his novels, Leo Tolstoy renounced fiction in favor of religious and philosophical tracts--The Death of Ivan Ilych represents perhaps the most keenly realized melding of Tolstoy's spirituality with his artistic skills.Here in a vibrant new translation, the tale of a judge who slowly comes to understand that his illness is fatal was inspired by Tolstoy's observation at his local train station of hundreds of shackled prisoners being sent off to Siberia, many for petty crimes. When he learned that the sentencing judge had died, Tolstoy was roused to consider the judge's thoughts during his final days--a study on the acceptance of mortality only deepened by the death, during its writing, of one of Tolstoy's own young children.The final result is a magisterial story, both chilling and beguiling in the fullness of its empathy, its quotidian detail, and the beauty of its prose, and is, as many have claimed it to be, one of the most moving novellas ever written.From the Trade Paperback edition.

The Death of Ivan Ilyich

by Leo Tolstoy

Too short to be a novel, too long to be a short story, the novella is generally unrecognized by academics and publishers. Nonetheless, it is a form beloved and practiced by literature's greatest writers. In ART OF THE NOVELLA series, Melville House celebrates this renegade art form and its practitioners with titles that are, in many instances, presented in book form for the first time. Written eight years after the publication ofAnna Karenina--a time during which, despite the global success of his novels, Leo Tolstoy renounced fiction in favor of religious and philosophical tracts--The Death of Ivan Ilychrepresents perhaps the most keenly realized melding of Tolstoy's spirituality with his artistic skills. Here in a vibrant new translation, the tale of a judge who slowly comes to understand that his illness is fatal was inspired by Tolstoy's observation at his local train station of hundreds of shackled prisoners being sent off to Siberia, many for petty crimes. When he learned that the sentencing judge had died, Tolstoy was roused to consider the judge's thoughts during his final days--a study on the acceptance of mortality only deepened by the death, during its writing, of one of Tolstoy's own young children. The final result is a magisterial story, both chilling and beguiling in the fullness of its empathy, its quotidian detail, and the beauty of its prose, and is, as many have claimed it to be, one of the most moving novellas ever written.

The Death of Ivan Ilyich and Master and Man

by Leo Tolstoy

This new edition combines Tolstoy's most famous short tale,The Death of Ivan Ilyich, with a less well known but equally brilliant gem,Master and Man, both newly translated by Ann Pasternak Slater. Both stories confront death and the process of dying: InIvan Ilyich, a bureaucrat looks back over his life, which suddenly seems meaningless and wasteful, while in Master and Man, a landowner and servant must each confront the value of the other as they brave a devastating snowstorm. The quintessential Tolstoyan themes of mortality, spiritual redemption, and life's meaning are nowhere more movingly and deftly explored than in these two tales. This unique edition also includes a critical Introduction and extensive notes by Ann Pasternak Slater, a Fellow at St. Anne's College, Oxford. From the Hardcover edition.

The Death of Ivan Ilyich and Other Stories

by Leo Tolstoy

Too short to be a novel, too long to be a short story, the novella is generally unrecognized by academics and publishers. Nonetheless, it is a form beloved and practiced by literature's greatest writers. In ART OF THE NOVELLA series, Melville House celebrates this renegade art form and its practitioners with titles that are, in many instances, presented in book form for the first time. Written eight years after the publication ofAnna Karenina--a time during which, despite the global success of his novels, Leo Tolstoy renounced fiction in favor of religious and philosophical tracts--The Death of Ivan Ilychrepresents perhaps the most keenly realized melding of Tolstoy's spirituality with his artistic skills. Here in a vibrant new translation, the tale of a judge who slowly comes to understand that his illness is fatal was inspired by Tolstoy's observation at his local train station of hundreds of shackled prisoners being sent off to Siberia, many for petty crimes. When he learned that the sentencing judge had died, Tolstoy was roused to consider the judge's thoughts during his final days--a study on the acceptance of mortality only deepened by the death, during its writing, of one of Tolstoy's own young children. The final result is a magisterial story, both chilling and beguiling in the fullness of its empathy, its quotidian detail, and the beauty of its prose, and is, as many have claimed it to be, one of the most moving novellas ever written.

The Death of Ivan Ilyich and Other Stories

by Leo Tolstoy Lynn Solotaroff

Hailed as one of the world's supreme masterpieces on the subject of death and dying, The Death of Ivan Ilyich is the story of a worldly careerist, a high court judge who has never given the inevitability of his death so much as a passing thought. But one day death announces itself to him, and to his shocked surprise he is brought face to face with his own mortality. How, Tolstoy asks, does an unreflective man confront his one and only moment of truth? This short novel was the artistic culmination of a profound spiritual crisis in Tolstoy's life, a nine-year period following the publication of Anna Karenina during which he wrote not a word of fiction. A thoroughly absorbing and, at times, terrifying glimpse into the abyss of death, it is also a strong testament to the possibility of finding spiritual salvation.

The Death of Ivan Ilyich and Other Stories

by Leo Tolstoy Larissa Volokhonsky Richard Pevear

A vibrant translation of Tolstoy's most important short fiction by the award-winning translators of War and Peace. Here are eleven masterful stories from the mature author, some autobiographical, others moral parables, and all told with the evocative power that was Tolstoy's alone. They include "The Prisoner of the Caucasus," inspired by Tolstoy's own experiences as a soldier in the Chechen War, "Hadji Murat," the novella Harold Bloom called "the best story in the world," "The Devil," a fascinating tale of sexual obsession, and the celebrated "The Death of Ivan Ilyich," an intense and moving examination of death and the possibilities of redemption. Pevear and Volokhonsky's translation captures the richness, immediacy, and multiplicity of Tolstoy's language, and reveals the author as a passionate moral guide, an unflinching seeker of truth, and ultimately, a creator of enduring and universal art.From the Trade Paperback edition.

The Devil

by Leo Tolstoy Louise Maude Alymer Maude

"I am acting badly," thought Yevgeny, "But what's one to do? Anyhow it is not for long."Leo Tolstoy is known for epic novels that brilliantly dissect society, but the novella The Devil may be the most personally revealing--and startling--fiction he ever wrote. He thought it so scandalous, in fact, that he hid the manuscript in the upholstery of a chair in his office so his wife wouldn't find it, and he would never allow it to be published in his lifetime.Perhaps that's because the gripping tale of an aristocratic landowner slowly overcome with unrelenting sexual desire for one of the peasants on his estate was strikingly similar to an affair Tolstoy himself had. Regardless, the tale--presented here with the two separate endings Tolstoy couldn't decide between--is a scintillating study of sexual attraction and human obsession. The Art of The Novella Series Too short to be a novel, too long to be a short story, the novella is generally unrecognized by academics and publishers. Nonetheless, it is a form beloved and practiced by literature's greatest writers. In the Art Of The Novella series, Melville House celebrates this renegade art form and its practitioners with titles that are, in many instances, presented in book form for the first time.

Family Happiness

by Leo Tolstoy

A short story from the Classic Shorts collection: Family Happiness by Leo Tolstoy

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