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The Color of Water 10th Anniversary Edition

by James Mcbride

The New York Times bestselling story from the author of The Good Lord Bird, winner of the 2013 National Book Award for Fiction. Who is Ruth McBride Jordan? A self-declared "light-skinned" woman evasive about her ethnicity, yet steadfast in her love for her twelve black children. James McBride, journalist, musician, and son, explores his mother's past, as well as his own upbringing and heritage, in a poignant and powerful debut, The Color Of Water: A Black Man's Tribute to His White Mother. The son of a black minister and a woman who would not admit she was white, James McBride grew up in "orchestrated chaos" with his eleven siblings in the poor, all-black projects of Red Hook, Brooklyn. "Mommy," a fiercely protective woman with "dark eyes full of pep and fire," herded her brood to Manhattan's free cultural events, sent them off on buses to the best (and mainly Jewish) schools, demanded good grades, and commanded respect. As a young man, McBride saw his mother as a source of embarrassment, worry, and confusion--and reached thirty before he began to discover the truth about her early life and long-buried pain. In The Color of Water, McBride retraces his mother's footsteps and, through her searing and spirited voice, recreates her remarkable story. The daughter of a failed itinerant Orthodox rabbi, she was born Rachel Shilsky (actually Ruchel Dwara Zylska) in Poland on April 1, 1921. Fleeing pogroms, her family emigrated to America and ultimately settled in Suffolk, Virginia, a small town where anti-Semitism and racial tensions ran high. With candor and immediacy, Ruth describes her parents' loveless marriage; her fragile, handicapped mother; her cruel, sexually-abusive father; and the rest of the family and life she abandoned. At seventeen, after fleeing Virginia and settling in New York City, Ruth married a black minister and founded the all- black New Brown Memorial Baptist Church in her Red Hook living room. "God is the color of water," Ruth McBride taught her children, firmly convinced that life's blessings and life's values transcend race. Twice widowed, and continually confronting overwhelming adversity and racism, Ruth's determination, drive and discipline saw her dozen children through college--and most through graduate school. At age 65, she herself received a degree in social work from Temple University. Interspersed throughout his mother's compelling narrative, McBride shares candid recollections of his own experiences as a mixed-race child of poverty, his flirtations with drugs and violence, and his eventual self- realization and professional success. The Color of Water touches readers of all colors as a vivid portrait of growing up, a haunting meditation on race and identity, and a lyrical valentine to a mother from her son.

The Color of Water: A Black Man's Tribute to His White Mother

by James Mcbride

Who is Ruth McBride Jordan? A self-declared "light-skinned" woman evasive about her ethnicity, yet steadfast in her love for her twelve black children. James McBride, journalist, musician, and son, explores his mother's past, as well as his own upbringing and heritage, in a poignant and powerful debut,The Color Of Water: A Black Man's Tribute to His White Mother. The son of a black minister and a woman who would not admit she was white, James McBride grew up in "orchestrated chaos" with his eleven siblings in the poor, all-black projects of Red Hook, Brooklyn. "Mommy," a fiercely protective woman with "dark eyes full of pep and fire," herded her brood to Manhattan's free cultural events, sent them off on buses to the best (and mainly Jewish) schools, demanded good grades, and commanded respect. As a young man, McBride saw his mother as a source of embarrassment, worry, and confusion-and reached thirty before he began to discover the truth about her early life and long-buried pain. In The Color of Water, McBride retraces his mother's footsteps and, through her searing and spirited voice, recreates her remarkable story. The daughter of a failed itinerant Orthodox rabbi, she was born Rachel Shilsky (actually Ruchel Dwara Zylska) in Poland on April 1, 1921. Fleeing pogroms, her family emigrated to America and ultimately settled in Suffolk, Virginia, a small town where anti-Semitism and racial tensions ran high. With candor and immediacy, Ruth describes her parents' loveless marriage; her fragile, handicapped mother; her cruel, sexually-abusive father; and the rest of the family and life she abandoned. At seventeen, after fleeing Virginia and settling in New York City, Ruth married a black minister and founded the all- black New Brown Memorial Baptist Church in her Red Hook living room. "God is the color of water," Ruth McBride taught her children, firmly convinced that life's blessings and life's values transcend race. Twice widowed, and continually confronting overwhelming adversity and racism, Ruth's determination, drive and discipline saw her dozen children through college-and most through graduate school. At age 65, she herself received a degree in social work from Temple University. Interspersed throughout his mother's compelling narrative, McBride shares candid recollections of his own experiences as a mixed-race child of poverty, his flirtations with drugs and violence, and his eventual self- realization and professional success. The Color of Water touches readers of all colors as a vivid portrait of growing up, a haunting meditation on race and identity, and a lyrical valentine to a mother from her son.

Everyday Math: Student Reference Book, Grade 5

by James Mcbride Andy Isaacs Max Bell Amy Dillard John Bretzlauf Jean Bell Robert Hartfield Kathleen Pitvorec Peter Saecker Deborah Arron Leslie

One can use the Student Reference Book to look up and review information on topics in mathematics.

Everyday Mathematics, Home Links (Grade 2)

by James Mcbride Andy Isaacs Max Bell Amy Dillard John Bretzlauf Jean Bell Robert Hartfield Kathleen Pitvorec Peter Saecker Cheryl G. Moran

This easy-to-use consumable grade-specific book contains extensions and review problems for each lesson to help families support their children's mathematical development.

Everyday Mathematics: Student Reference Book

by James Mcbride Andy Isaacs Max Bell Amy Dillard John Bretzlauf Jean Bell Robert Hartfield Kathleen Pitvorec Peter Saecker

This Student Reference Book can be used to look up and review topics in mathematics. It has the following sections: 1) A Table of Contents that lists the sections and shows how the book is organized. 2) Essays within each section. 3) Directions on how to play some of the mathematical games you may have played before. 4) A Data Bank with posters, maps, and other information. 5) A Glossary of mathematical terms. 6) An Answer Key and 7) An Index to help you locate information quickly.

Everyday Mathematics: Student Reference Book: Grade 3

by James Mcbride Andy Isaacs Max Bell Amy Dillard John Bretzlauf Jean Bell Robert Hartfield Kathleen Pitvorec Peter Saecker

You can use this Student Reference Book to look up and review topics in mathematics.

The Good Lord Bird

by James Mcbride

Henry Shackleford is a young slave living in the Kansas Territory in 1857, when the region is a battleground between anti- and pro-slavery forces. When John Brown, the legendary abolitionist, arrives in the area, an argument between Brown and Henry's master quickly turns violent. Henry is forced to leave town--with Brown, who believes he's a girl. Over the ensuing months, Henry--whom Brown nicknames Little Onion--conceals his true identity as he struggles to stay alive. Eventually Little Onion finds himself with Brown at the historic raid on Harpers Ferry in 1859--one of the great catalysts for the Civil War. An absorbing mixture of history and imagination, and told with McBride's meticulous eye for detail and character, The Good Lord Bird is both a rousing adventure and a moving exploration of identity and survival.

The Good Lord Bird

by James Mcbride

Winner of the 2013 National Book Award for Fiction Soon to be a major motion picture starring Liev Shreiber and Jaden Smith A Washington Post, Publishers Weekly, Oprah Magazine Top 10 Book of the Year Winner of the Morning News Tournament of Champions "A magnificent new novel by the best-selling author James McBride." -cover review of The New York Times Book Review "Outrageously entertaining." -USA Today "James McBride delivers another tour de force" -Essence "So imaginative, you'll race to the finish." -NPR.org "Wildly entertaining."--4-star People lead review "A boisterous, highly entertaining, altogether original novel." - Washington Post From the bestselling author of The Color of Water and Song Yet Sung comes the story of a young boy born a slave who joins John Brown's antislavery crusade--and who must pass as a girl to survive. Henry Shackleford is a young slave living in the Kansas Territory in 1857, when the region is a battleground between anti- and pro-slavery forces. When John Brown, the legendary abolitionist, arrives in the area, an argument between Brown and Henry's master quickly turns violent. Henry is forced to leave town--with Brown, who believes he's a girl. Over the ensuing months, Henry--whom Brown nicknames Little Onion--conceals his true identity as he struggles to stay alive. Eventually Little Onion finds himself with Brown at the historic raid on Harpers Ferry in 1859--one of the great catalysts for the Civil War. An absorbing mixture of history and imagination, and told with McBride's meticulous eye for detail and character, The Good Lord Bird is both a rousing adventure and a moving exploration of identity and survival.

Miracle at St. Anna (Movie Tie-in)

by James Mcbride

From the New York Times bestselling author of The Good Lord Bird, winner of the 2013 National Book Award for Fiction. James McBride's powerful memoir, The Color of Water, was a groundbreaking literary phenomenon that transcended racial and religious boundaries, garnering unprecedented acclaim and topping bestseller lists for more than two years. Now McBride turns his extraordinary gift for storytelling to fiction--in a universal tale of courage and redemption inspired by a little-known historic event. In Miracle at St. Anna, toward the end of World War II, four Buffalo Soldiers from the Army's Negro 92nd Division find themselves separated from their unit and behind enemy lines. Risking their lives for a country in which they are treated with less respect than the enemy they are fighting, they discover humanity in the small Tuscan village of St. Anna di Stazzema--in the peasants who shelter them, in the unspoken affection of an orphaned child, in a newfound faith in fellow man. And even in the face of unspeakable tragedy, they--and we--learn to see the small miracles of life. This acclaimed novel is now a major motion picture directed by Spike Lee.

Riverhead Books Summer 2013 Insider

by James Mcbride Khaled Hosseini Matthew Berry Riverhead Books Anton Disclafani

Riverhead Books is proud to present our Summer 2013 Insider which gives readers more information about the stories behind--or sometimes from within--our Summer 2013 list. Included in the Riverhead Books Summer 2013 Insider are:A Q&A with Khaled Hosseini, author of And the Mountains Echoed, an unforgettable novel about finding a lost piece of yourself in someone else. An interview with Pransky, the layabout mutt turned therapy dog at the heart of Sue Halpern's A Dog Walks into a Nursing Home: Lessons in the Good Life from an Unlikely Teacher. Ramona Ausubel's essay, "Transformation," about the inspiration for A Guide to Being Born, her enthralling new collection that uses the world of the imagination to explore the heart of the human condition. "The Story in the Mountains," an essay by Anton DiSclafani about writing her debut novel, The Yonahlossee Riding Camp for Girls, a lush, sexy evocative story of family secrets and girls'-school rituals set in the 1930s South. "Looking through the Looking Glass," an essay by Anna Badkhen on how she came to write The World is a Carpet, her unforgettable portrait of a place and people shaped by centuries of art, trade and war. A note from Mark Kurlansky about "Dancing in the Street," the iconic song he uses as a lens to examine the story of the civil rights movement's genesis in his new book, Ready for a Brand New Beat Matthew Berry's essay, "It's Fantasy Sports World, You Just Live in It," about the growing world of fantasy sports and how it has shaped his career and personal life which he details in his new book, Fantasy Life. "Noodles of the Silk Road," a field guide by Jen Lin-Liu, author of On the Noodle Road, in which she immerses herself in a moveable feast of foods and cultures and discovers some surprising truths about commitment, independence, and love A brief history of the historic raid on Harper's Ferry which plays a key role in James McBride's new novel, The Good Lord Bird, the story of a young boy born a slave who joins John Brown's antislavery crusade--and who must pass as a girl to survive. Juan Gabriel Vásquez's essay, "Memories of the Years of Chaos," about how Colombia's recent history informs his new novel, The Sound of Things FallingEach of these pieces is an engaging and informative introduction to these truly wonderful books.

Song Yet Sung

by James Mcbride

Liz Spocott, a beautiful young runaway slave, suffers a nasty head wound just before being nabbed by a posse of slave catchers. She falls into a coma, and, when she awakes, she can see the future-from the near-future to Martin Luther King to hip-hop-in her dreams. Liz's visions help her and her fellow slaves escape, but soon there are new dangers on her trail: Patty Cannon and her brutal gang of slave catchers, and a competing slave catcher, nicknamed The Gimp, who has a surprising streak of morality. Liz has some friends, including an older woman who teaches her The Code that guides runaways; a handsome young slave; and a wild inhabitant of the woods and swamps. Kidnappings, gunfights and chases ensue as Liz drifts in and out of her visions, which serve as a thoughtful meditation on the nature of freedom and offer sharp social commentary on contemporary America.

Song Yet Sung

by James Mcbride

Nowhere has the drama of American slavery played itself out with more tension than in the dripping swamps of Maryland's eastern shore, where abolitionists such as Frederick Douglass and Harriet Tubman, born less than thirty miles apart, faced off against nefarious slave traders in a catch-me-if-you-can game that fueled fear and brought economic hardship to both white and black families. Trapped in the middle were the watermen, a group of America's most original and colorful pioneers, poor oystermen who often found themselves caught between the needs of rich plantation owners and the roaring Chesapeake, which often claimed their lives. The powerful web of relationships in a small Chesapeake Bay town collapses as two souls face off in a gripping page-turner. Liz Spocott, a young runaway who has odd dreams about the future of the colored race, mistakenly inspires a breakout from the prison attic of a notorious slave thief named Patty Cannon. As Cannon stokes revenge, Liz flees into the nefarious world of the underground railroad with its double meanings and unspoken clues to freedom known to the slaves of Dorchester County as "The Code. " Denwood Long, a troubled slave catcher and eastern shore waterman, is coaxed out of retirement to break "The Code" and track down Liz. Filled with rich history-much of the story is drawn from historical events-and told in McBride's signature lyrical storytelling style, Song Yet Sung brings into full view a world long misunderstood in American fiction: how slavery worked, and the haunting, moral choices that lived beneath the surface, pressing both whites and blacks to search for relief in a world where both seemed to lose their moral compass. This is a story of tragic triumph, violent decisions, and unexpected kindness. .

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