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Achingly Alice (Alice McKinley #10)

by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor

Alice has decided she needs priorities in her life -- and the first is to get her favorite teacher, Miss Summers, to marry her father. The only problem is that the vice principal, Mr. Sorringer, wants to marry Miss Summers too, and Miss Summers seems to be having trouble making up her mind. How can someone be in love with two people at the same time? It doesn't make sense to Alice -- until Sam, her friend from Camera Club, starts to pay attention to her. Sam is quiet and gentle, and a terrific dancer -- Alice likes being with him. But Alice has been Patrick's girlfriend for almost two years -- so why is she interested in another guy?

The Agony of Alice

by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor

Life, Alice McKinley feels, is just one big embarrassment. Here she is, about to be a teenager and she doesn't know how. It's worse for her than for anyone else, she believes, because she has no role model. Her mother has been dead for years. Help and advice can only come from her father, manager of a music store, and her nineteen-year-old brother, who is a slob. What do they know about being a teen age girl? What she needs, Alice decides, is a gorgeous woman who does everything right, as a roadmap, so to speak. If only she finds herself, when school begins, in the classroom of the beautiful sixth-grade teacher, Miss Cole, her troubles will be over. Unfortunately, she draws the homely, pear-shaped Mrs. Plotkin. One of Mrs. Plotkin's first assignments is for each member of the class to keep a journal of their thoughts and feelings. Alice calls hers "The Agony of Alice," and in it she records all the embarrassing things that happen to her. Through the school year, Alice has lots to record. She also comes to know the lovely Miss Cole, as well as Mrs. Plotkin. And she meets an aunt and a female cousin whom she has not really known before. Out of all this, to her amazement, comes a role model -- one that she would never have accepted before she made a few very important discoveries on her own, things no roadmap could have shown her. Alice moves on, ready to be a wise teenager.

Alice Alone

by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor

There's a new girl in town, and she's making Alice very nervous. The start of ninth grade -- high school! -- is every bit as exciting, and challenging, as Alice had hoped, and feared, it would be. She finds her self-confidence rising, and plummeting, depending on each new situation. Classes are definitely more interesting, but algebra is proving to be nearly impossible. Patrick is in the accelerated program so they aren't in the same classes anymore. And while she's thrilled to be chosen to work on the school newspaper, she finds that between an increased homework load and reporting assignments, she can't always join Patrick when he wants to go out. But the new girl in town, Penny, can...and does. Penny is everything Alice isn't -- perky, petite, and cute as a button, and she doesn't hide her interest in Patrick. Alice senses her seemingly perfect relationship with Patrick starting to crumble, along with her self-confidence, and suddenly, Alice feels big and awkward and not particularly attractive. Could it be possible that Patrick could like someone else besides her? She can't imagine life without Patrick in it. But Patrick's behavior isn't the only thing that is baffling Alice. Elizabeth's nearly hysterical reluctance to go to her piano lessons has Alice and Pamela completely bewildered, until Elizabeth breaks down and shares an awful secret she's kept from everybody since she was seven... And as Alice struggles to keep her jealousy of Penny at bay, she watches her father handle unsettling news regarding his fiancé. Alice learns what trust is all about, and how confidence in yourself, and in others, is the most important thing of all.

Alice in April

by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor

April is the cruelest month," said the poet, and Alice McKinley would agree. April is a hard month. Not that she doesn't have some fun. It does begin with a wonderful April Fool's Day joke on her brother, Lester. But it also begins with Aunt Sally reminding her that she will soon be thirteen (as if anyone could forget something so important) and then she will be Woman of the House, since her mother is long dead. It is an awesome responsibility. All her life she had assumed that her father and Lester were there to take care of her; now she is going to have to take care of them. Taking care of Lester, alone, could be a full-time job, she thinks. Being Woman of the House has all sorts of drawbacks. For example: It never occurred to her that when she suggested her father and Lester ought to have physical checkups, her father would insist that she have one too. How could you let a doctor see you naked? Of course, Alice is still in school. And there she faces another crisis. She might be Woman of the House at home, but in school she needs a different kind of name, one given by a table full of boys in the cafeteria Depending on their figures, girls are being given state names -- some states have mountains and others do not. Will flat, flat Delaware or Louisiana be her fate? Alice lives in fear that it might be, though even worse is the fear that she might not get a name at all. The month ends with a dinner party for her father's birthday (part of being Woman of the House) that has more downs than ups -- and with a totally unexpected event that makes Alice and everyone she knows grow up a little and wonder a little deeper about life and the future. April is a hard month, but reading about Alice in April is to find that most tragedies (though not all) pass and tears can turn to laughter and delight.

Alice In-Between

by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor

In between, that's what Alice decides she is. During the spring of seventh grade and the summer that follows, she feels she is neither child nor woman, and waits, not so patiently, for beauty to blossom. As she turns 13 and her older brother, Lester, takes her out on the town, some almost grown-up things happen to her, but there are unexpected dangers attached. And a marvelous trip to Chicago with her best friends, Pamela and Elizabeth, proves that "in-between" may not be such a bad place to be after all, when Pamela, acting too old for her age, attracts some unwanted attention, and Elizabeth promptly goes into shock. And when Patrick comes back into Alice's life again, she realizes she doesn't have to rush things. Being 13 has its advantages, she decides. Taking the pencil test, buying a hermit crab, and taking part in long conversations about life and sex are all a part of her world now. Alice is glad that the first seven grades are over with and she's a teenager at last, but she's also happy she does not yet have to face some of the problems -- mostly with girls -- that her brother faces, or even her father. For anyone who is in-between (and who isn't?) Alice in-Between is a book to savor.

Alice in Blunderland

by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor

Here are all the embarrassing things that might happen to you in the fourth grade -- and do happen to you, if your name is Alice McKinley: 1. Your next-door neighbor (who happens to be a BOY!) sees you in your underpants. 2. You sneeze beans all over your best friend. 3. Your brother lies to you for fun and you believe him. 4. You get trapped inside a snow cave -- your own snow cave, that is. 5. You're the only person in the whole grade who can't sing. Alice can't seem to do anything right anymore, especially where her big brother Lester is concerned. When he gets really angry with her, Alice doesn't know how to fix things between them. How is she going to get Lester to talk to her again? And will life ever get any easier? Fourth grade can't end soon enough!The second of three prequels to the beloved Alice series, Alice in Blunderland lets younger readers get to know the girl everyone wants to be friends with, and proves once again that Phyllis Reynolds Naylor knows the fears, foibles, and fun of being a girl.

Alice in Charge

by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor

Alice's memorable last year of high school is being overshadowed by some very difficult situations. A sudden increase in vandalism at the school leads Alice to discover an angry and violent group of students--teenage Neo-Nazis. Then an awkward hallway encounter gets a classmate to confess that a new, attentive teacher has been taking advantage of her. All at once, Alice's safe and comfortable school starts feeling strange and serious--all this plus the normal senior year pressures of college applications and life-making decisions. Alice has two options: step up or melt down. The choice is simple, and true to the character that readers have loved for years....Alice steps up--in a big way.

Alice in Lace

by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor

Alice suddenly finds herself married! Well, sort of. In an eighth grade health class, she and her friends are each given a hypothetical situation to help them learn to make good decisions. It's all great fun until one of the students creates a problem that could have serious consequences for the whole class. The first semester of eighth grade is both exciting and complicated as Alice learns something about last year's English teacher, Miss Summers, who is dating her father, and when one of her brother's old girlfriends makes a startling announcement. Then there is the problem of how to afford a wedding and honeymoon, the pranks with Pamela's pillow, a harrowing ride in a used car, Elizabeth's confession, Patrick's embarrassing request, and finally, a new person arrives on the scene. As usual, Alice has questions, but sometimes no one has the answers.

Alice in Rapture, Sort Of

by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor

"The Summer of the First Boyfriend," Alice's father calls it. It is also the summer between grade school and junior high. Alice's friends keep telling her what she has to do to be a successful seventh grader. She may need a leather skirt. (Alice knows she'll never have one.) And certainly she'll need that boyfriend. In fact, one of Alice's friends has heard that a girl will never have any kind of social life in high school if she doesn't have a boyfriend when she enters junior high. That makes Alice very glad she has Patrick. And glad when her friends Elizabeth and Pamela have boyfriends, too. It is going to be a good summer, she thinks. And, in this sequel to The Agony of Alice, it is a good summer. There are ball games in the park, bike riding, sitting on the front porch with Patrick and talking -- and sometimes eating chocolates -- and sometimes kissing. But there are problems, too. How do you make yourself beautiful when you are not? How do you cope with an older brother who has no tact and no understanding of your problems? And most of all, how do you act with a boyfriend? Some of the things she hears make Alice think she needs a manual of instructions. Through triumphs and disasters at the beach, through the trauma of dinner at the country club with Patrick, through moments of terrible embarrassment and discouraging attempts to sort out what having a boyfriend is all about, and through surprising thoughts and decisions, Alice persists in being Alice, a girl who wants to be like other people but who can't stop being herself. Her problems are fun and funny, and readers will find a lot of themselves and their own problems in Alice and her friends.

Alice in the Know

by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor

It's the summer before junior year, and Alice is looking forward to three months of excitement, passion, and drama. But what does she find? A summer working in a local department store, trying to stop shoplifters, and more "real life" problems than she could have ever imagined: A good friend becomes seriously ill, Lester has more romance problems than even Alice knows what to do with, and the gang from Mark Stedmeister's pool is starting to grow up a bit faster than Alice is comfortable with.... Fortunately for Alice her family and friends are with her through it all, and by the end of the summer, Alice finds she knows a whole lot more than she had in June. Funny, touching, and always provocative, Phyllis Reynolds Naylor does it again, proving with this twenty-first book in the beloved Alice series that she understands what real girls think and feel.

Alice on Board

by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor

In her last adventure before starting college, Alice takes to the open sea for the summer--and nothing can stop the tides of change.Everything Alice has ever known is about to change--from where she sleeps at night to how close her closest friends will be. So Alice is meeting that seasick feeling head-on by setting sail as staff on a Chesapeake Bay cruise ship. And like any last great adventure before starting college, Alice knows she'll need sunblock, an open mind, and...oh yeah, all her best girlfriends. It's the perfect summer job. Perfect, that is, when things are going perfectly. But when they're not, Alice has to figure out how to weather unexpected storms of all sorts. Which could be perfect after all--perfect training for her next big adventure--college.

Alice on Her Way

by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor

Imagine it: a weekend without your parents; a weekend in a hotel with your best friends; a weekend in one of the biggest, loudest, craziest cities in the world. Jealous yet? Well, get ready to turn green with envy because Alice, Pam, Liz, and Gwen are headed to New York City for the weekend! Sure, it's a school trip and there'll be some educational stuff like museums and plays and visiting Ellis Island, but what the girls really can't wait for is everything they're going to do when their teachers go to bed. Bars, clubs, dancing, shopping, and boys...anything is possible. The city awaits them, and all they have to do to have the time of their lives is sneak past a few hotel clerks. Alice can't wait to hit New York. A weekend with her friends is just what she needs right now. Sophomore year and driving lessons are a lot harder than she thought they would be, and it's time for her to get away from all that work and have some fun. Plus, she's got the loooong bus ride home in the dark with her new boyfriend to look forward to.... Funny, cool, and always provocative, Phyllis Reynolds Naylor does it again, proving that she understands what real girls think and feel, with this seventeenth book in the beloved Alice series.

Alice on the Outside (Alice #11)

by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor

Alice McKinley likes her life, but she senses things are changing. She gets a little bored by her best friends Elizabeth's and Pamela's obsession with clothes and makeup. She's just not that interested. And though she is very interested in her boyfriend, Patrick, she's not entirely sure how to keep their relationship going. Alice is struggling to figure out how she feels about things--and then how her feelings fits into what other people think she should be feeling. Getting older is even trickier than Alice thought--is she ready for the challenge? As Alice stumbles her way through the minefield of early adolescence, there are plenty of bumps, giggles, and surprises along the way. Every girl should grow up with Alice, and with this irresistible new look, a whole new generation will want to.inds, it is not planning that matters, but coping. Alice is growing up. She is meeting new people, facing new problems, and giving readers new things to laugh and think about. She's experimenting with life and finding it can be awful -- but also, sometimes, very, very good.

Alice the Brave

by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor

A month before eighth grade begins, Alice realizes she is going to have to face something she's been afraid of forever. Everybody, she knows, is afraid of something: elevators, dogs, planes, spiders . . . but her fear is worse. It's going to bring absolute disaster to the rest of her summer, maybe to the rest of her life. The truth is she's afraid of deep water! It's a hot August, and everyone in Alice's gang goes to Mark Stedmeister's swimming pool almost every day. Alice sits at the shallow end. She plays badminton. She makes excuses, and keeps her problem secret. Meanwhile, Elizabeth and Pamela, Alice's two best friends, tackle problems of their own, and are more or less successful. Life is changing for everyone but Alice. Bravery begins in little ways, with small steps. That's what Alice finally discovers. And after she faces this particular fear, she knows she can summon the courage to face other fears as well. As in her previous adventures, Alice tackles some of the big problems of growing up with humor and enterprise and learns once again that a brother, a father, and friends can offer amazing amounts of help.

All Because I'm Older

by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor

An 8-year-old gets blamed for his sibling's mistakes.

All But Alice

by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor

There are, Alice decides, 272 horrible things left to happen to her in her life, based on the number of really horrible things that have happened already. She figures that out after the disaster of the talent show. And she realizes that there is no way to fend them off. But, she reasons, if you don't have a mother, maybe a sister would help. Maybe lots of sisters, a worldwide sisterhood. Be like everyone else, do what others do, and best of all, be part of the "in" group. Then you have sympathy and protection. It is with this in mind that Alice joins the All-Stars Fan Club and the earring club and becomes one of the Famous Eight. It helps, even when it's a bit boring. On the whole, Alice thinks, she is enjoying seventh grade more than she had ever expected. Yet Sisterhood, even Famous Eighthood, does not take care of all of her problems or answer all of her questions about life and love. Can she be Sisters with all three girls who want to be her brother Lester's girlfriends? How does she treat the fact that her father is dating her teacher, Miss Summers? How do you accept a box of valentine candy from a boy? In fact, how do boys fit into Universal Sisterhood -- or is there a Universal Humanhood? How far do you go when being part of the crowd means doing something you don't want to do? As in the earlier Alice books, Alice copes with life in her own way, and her answers to her endless problems are often funny and surprisingly right.

Almost Alice

by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor

Is it possible to be too good a friend -- too understanding, too always there, too much like a doormat? Alice has always been a good friend to Pamela and Liz, a best friend to Pamela and Liz. But she's starting to wonder where that leaves her: What am I? An ear for listening? An arm around the shoulder? And then there's Patrick -- after ending their relationship two years ago, he's suddenly calling again, and wants to take her to his senior prom. What does that mean? As Alice tries to figure out who she is in relation to her friends, she learns one thing -- sometimes friends need you more than they let on...especially when the unthinkable happens. Always honest, brave, and true, the Alice series never flinches from big issues, and never discounts the small ones.

Anyone Can Eat Squid!

by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor

Sarah longs to find a way to be someone special, and when her friend's Chinese restaurant needs customers, she finds a special way to save it.

Beetles, Lightly Toasted

by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor

Because it is offered only to fifth graders, this is Andy's one chance to enter and win the Roger B. Sudermann essay contest. Grand prize: $50 and, most important of all, Andy's name and picture in the newspaper. But unlike other years, when the topic assigned had been really exciting, this year's topic is a bummer. Andy's cousin, and rival, Jack, has no trouble getting started, but Andy doesn't know what he will do. Then he notices a big brown beetle crawling through the grass. One thing leads to another, and before long, Andy is using Aunt Wanda's saucepans for recipes Aunt Wanda never dreamed. Just when his essay is going well, however, Andy realizes that if he does win the contest, he's in big trouble!

Being Danny's Dog

by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor

Two brothers, Danny and T.R., have just moved into a new neighborhood. Danny meets a new friend who makes a habit of getting into trouble. Can TR keep Danny out of trouble?

Bernie and the Bessledorf Ghost

by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor

Living at the Bessledorf Hotel, where his father works as the manager, Bernie tries to solve the mystery of a troubled, young ghost who wanders the halls of the hotel at night.

Bernie Magruder and the Bats in the Belfry

by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor

Many residents of Middleburg, Indiana, are already going crazy from the ever-ringing church bells and now, after a bat is spotted in the hotel run by Bernie's family, they worry that the dangerous Indiana Aztec bat has finally arrived.

Bernie Magruder and the Bus Station Blow-Up

by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor

After several bombs go off around town, eleven-year-old Bernie Magruder becomes suspicious of various members of his family, causing confusion in Officer Feeney's investigation and around the hotel that his parents run.

Bernie Magruder and the Case of the Big Stink

by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor

Sam suspects the culprit who is gassing assembly line workers in the parachute factory lives in the hotel his family manages.

Bernie Magruder and the Disappearing Bodies

by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor

Dead bodies which appear and disappear mysteriously are threatening to lose Bernie's father his- job as manager of the Bessledorf Hotel. What can be done? How do you find a ghost?

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