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Austrian Army of the Napoleonic Wars (1)

by Philip Haythornthwaite Bryan Fosten

Packed with specially commissioned artwork, maps and diagrams, the Men-at-Arms series is an unrivalled illustrated reference on the history, organisation, uniforms and equipment of the world's military forces, past and present.

Austrian Army of the Napoleonic Wars (2): Cavalry

by Philip Haythornthwaite Bryan Fosten

The mounted troops of the Hapsburg Empire comprised one of the most powerful forces of the Napoleonic Wars (1799-1815). However, from the outset the cavalry's higher command was less capable than its infantry counterpart: appointments were influenced by nepotism and politics, which resulted in commands often being given to those who lacked experience. The cavalry underwent many re-organisations and expansions in the course of the wars that attempted to redress these matters, and to modernise the force as a whole. This title examines these processes and documents in detail the tactics, uniforms and equipment of the Austrian cavalry, covering Cuirassiers, Dragoons, Chevauxlegers, Hussars, Uhlan (lancer) and auxiliary units.

Austrian Specialist Troops of the Napoleonic Wars

by Bryan Fosten Philip Haythornthwaite

The specialist troops of the Austrian forces helped to secure Austria's reputation as the most formidable of Napoleon's continental enemies. Due largely to the efforts of Prince Liechtenstein, by the late 18th century the Austrian artillery had been the finest in Europe, and was held up as an example to the world. This text examines the famed Austrian artillery and other specialist troops of the Napoleonic Wars (1799-1815), including the Pioneers, Pontooneers, engineer services and medical service, detailing their organisation, equipment and uniforms in a volume complete with accompanying illustrations and colour plates.

Borodino 1812

by Peter Dennis Philip Haythornthwaite

The battle of Borodino was one of the greatest encounters in European history, and one of the largest and most sanguinary in the Napoleonic Wars. Following the breakdown of relations between Russia and France, Napoleon assembled a vast Grande Armée drawn from the many states within the French sphere of influence. They crossed the river Neimen and entered Russian territory in June 1812 with the aim of inflicting a sharp defeat on the Tsar's forces and bringing the Russians back into line. In a bloody battle of head-on attacks and desperate counter-attacks in the village of Borodino on 7 September 1812, both sides lost about a third of their men, with the Russians forced to withdraw and abandon Moscow to the French. However, the Grande Armée was harassed by Russian troops all the way back and was destroyed by the retreat. The greatest army Napoleon had ever commanded was reduced to a shadow of frozen, starving fugitives. This title will cover the events of Napoleon's disastrous Russian campaign of 1812 in its entirety, with the set-piece battle of Borodino proving the focal point of the book.

British Cavalryman 1792-1815

by Philip Haythornthwaite Richard Hook

In the campaigns of the French Revolutionary (1792-1802) and Napoleonic Wars (1799-1815), the deserved reputation of the British infantry has tended to overshadow the contribution of the cavalry, but in fact they did form an integral part of the army, carrying out duties crucial to the success of other arms. British Cavalryman 1792-1815 recounts what these duties were and examines the men who performed them. The different regiments of the cavalry are listed and some of the arm's more exotic or professional corps, such as the King's German Legion, examined.

British Napoleonic Infantry Tactics 1792-1815

by Steve Noon Philip Haythornthwaite

Osprey's study of Britain's infantry tactics used during the Napoleonic Wars (1799-1815). The British Army's major campaigns against Napoleon were fought between 1808 and 1813 in the Peninsula (Portugal, Spain, and finally southern France), followed in 1815 by the brief but climactic Waterloo campaign. The British Army was small by continental standards, but it consistently out-fought larger French armies, never losing a major open-field action. Its cavalry and artillery were standard; but its infantry which unlike foreign armies, was entirely made up of volunteers, achieved unique results. Their tactics were brought to a peak of professional perfection by Wellington, but commentators still consistently over-simplify the explanation for his unmatched series of victories. This book will examine the contemporary instruction manuals, and compare them with what actually happened in specific battles, drawing upon a mass of quotations from eyewitnesses. Under other generals who failed to grasp the essentials, the British infantry could be beaten (occasionally) by both the French, and by the Americans; but it was Wellington's perfect employment of their tactical strengths that made them unstoppable. With a detailed look at the effective use of terrain, line vs column maneuvers, and fortification assaults, Philip Haythornthwaite reveals the outstanding tactics of Wellington's army that converted volunteers into war-winning professionals.

Corunna 1809

by Philip Haythornthwaite Christa Hook

The retreat to Corunna is one of the epic campaigns of the Napoleonic Wars (1799-1815). Late in 1808 Sir John Moore found himself virtually alone with his small British army deep inside Spain. The armies of his Spanish allies had been overwhelmed and he faced a victorious French force under the Emperor Napoleon. He had little option but to order a retreat to the port of Corunna. This became the most arduous of trials with armies traversing mountainous terrain over appalling roads in the depths of winter. Somehow Moore held his outnumbered, exhausted men together as they struggled to reach safety. Finally at Corunna Moore's army turned to face its tormentors.

Frederick the Great's Army (3)

by Bryan Fosten Philip Haythornthwaite

Frederick the Great was not renowned as a great artillery enthusiast, however he did recognise the importance of artillery and greatly expanded the arm. Frederick was also aware of the value of strong fortifications as barriers against the manoeuvres of enemy armies, and as places of security for troops and magazines; some of these were of vital significance in the survival of Prussia during the Seven Years' War (1756-1763). This fascinating volume by Philip Haythornwaite examines the artillery, engineers and others specialist troops of Frederick the Great's army.

Gallipoli 1915

by Philip Haythornthwaite

The Gallipoli expedition of 1915, the brainchild of Winston Churchill, was designed to knock the Turkish Empire out of the First World War and open a supply route to Russia. The campaign is characterised by the military incompetence of the higher commands, particularly the Allies. However, in spite of this, Gallipoli deserves to be, and is, also remembered for the heroism and resourcefulness of both the British army and the men of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps. This book details the battles, hardships and eventual evacuation that these men had to go through, in this comprehensive guide to the Gallipoli landings of World War I (1914-1918).

Napoleonic Heavy Cavalry & Dragoon Tactics

by Adam Hook Philip Haythornthwaite

During the Napoleonic Wars the supreme battlefield shock weapon was the heavy cavalry - the French cuirassiers, and their British, Austrian, Prussian and Russian counterparts. Big men mounted on big horses, the heavy cavalry were armed with swords nearly a metre long, used for slashing or thrusting at their opponents; many wore steel armour, a practice revived by Napoleon. They were tasked with smashing a hole in the enemy's line of battle, with exploiting a weakness, or with turning a flank. Their classic manoeuvre was the charge; arrayed in close-order lines or columns, the heavy cavalry would begin their attack at the walk, building up to a gallop for the final 50 metres before impact.Illustrated with diagrams, relevant paintings and prints and specially prepared colour plates, this is the first volume of a two-part study of the cavalry tactics of the armies of Napoleon and those of his allies and opponents. Written by a leading authority on the period, it draws upon drill manuals and later writings to offer a vivid assessment of how heavy cavalry actually fought on the Napoleonic battlefield.

Napoleonic Light Cavalry Tactics

by Adam Hook Philip Haythornthwaite

During the Napoleonic Wars, all the major combatants fielded large numbers of light cavalry as Hussars, Dragoons, Chasseurs, Lancers, or even Cossacks. Ridley Scott's 1977 feature film debut The Duelists portrayed French Hussars. Light cavalry provided nimble, fast-moving regiments that performed a variety of vital roles, from reconnaissance and keeping contact with the enemy during the movement of armies, to raiding, skirmishing, and the pursuit to destruction of beaten enemies. In practice, light cavalry were often also employed for battlefield charges alongside the heavy cavalry.The light cavalryman typically carried a curved sabre, one or two pistols and sometimes a carbine, and rode a smaller horse than his counterpart in the heavy cavalry. As the Napoleonic Wars progressed, the dashing Chasseurs and Light Dragoons and glamorous Hussars were joined by growing numbers of Lancers, while the Russians employed vast numbers of Cossacks. Often the first to engage the enemy, these colourful regiments saw combat on a host of bloody battlefields across Europe.Featuring period illustrations and specially commissioned colour artwork, this is the second volume of a two-part study of the cavalry tactics of the armies of Napoleon and those of his allies and opponents. Written by a leading authority on the period, it draws upon drill manuals and later writings to offer a vivid assessment of how light cavalry actually fought on the Napoleonic battlefield.

Napoleon's Campaigns in Italy

by Richard Hook Philip Haythornthwaite

In January 1794 the French 'Army of Italy' was commanded by General Dumerbion and he acknowledged a great debt to his 25-year-old commander of artillery - Napoleon Bonaparte. The French Revolution had resulted in major changes in the military system, conscription created a national army and new tactics and initiatives allowed an officer of such promise as Napoleon to rise quickly through the ranks. By 1796 he was the general commanding the French in Italy and at the conclusion of fourteen months campaigning he was the decisive military personality of his age. Philip Haythornthwaite examines Napoleon's campaigns in Italy, and the uniforms of his soldiers are illustrated in eight colour plates by Richard Hook.

Napoleon's Guard Infantry (1)

by Philip Haythornthwaite Bryan Fosten

The concept of the bodyguard is as ancient as the practice of an individual assuming the leadership of a group or tribe. From the Companions of Alexander to the Varangians of Byzantium, bodies of élite warriors, owing personal allegiance to their sovereign and obeying no others, have illuminated or stained the annals of military history. Napoleon's Imperial Guards probably represent the last true link in a chain spanning the ages. Philip Haythornthwaite describes the history, organization and equipment of Napoleon's Guard Infantry during the Napoleonic Wars period (1799-1815) in an engaging work which includes numerous illustrations and eight full page color plates superbly drawn by Bryan Fosten.

Napoleon's Light Infantry

by Philip Haythornthwaite Bryan Fosten

Although light infantry tactics formed one of the cornerstones of the Napoleonic Wars (1799-1815), their employment was by no means restricted to Light regiments. Thus, from the early 1800s, if not before, the distinction between Light and Line infantry was largely one of costume and tradition. One marked difference from the Line infantry, however, was in the superior ésprit de corps of the Light regiments. Their attitude of superiority was reinforced by their different (and often more impressive) uniform, the theoretical difference in role, and supposed superior training. Philip Haythornwaite examines their uniforms in a volume including eight superb colour plates by Brian Fosten.

Napoleon's Specialist Troops

by Philip Haythornthwaite Bryan Fosten

Though less celebrated than the infantry and cavalry, Napoleon's 'specialist' troops - artillery, engineers and supporting services - were indispensable elements without which no army could have operated, and frequently assumed greater significance than the line regiments. Indeed, having suffered least from the emigration of Royalist officers, the artillery was the best element of the early Republican armies, the nucleus of the old Royal artillery serving with distinction in the early campaigns such as Valmy. The organisation and uniform of Napoleon's specialist troops are here examined by Philip Haythornwaite in a engaging volume complemented by a wealth of illustrations including eight full page colour plates by Bryan Fosten.

Nelson's Navy

by Philip Haythornthwaite Bill Younghusband

Despite the many celebrated victories of the British Army during the Napoleonic Wars (1799-1815), the role of the Royal Navy should never be overlooked. The 'wooden walls' formed the country's first and most important line of defence, and ranged throughout the world to protect Britain's trade-routes and in support of the land forces and overseas possessions. This book covers the huge variations in uniforms not just in the Navy but the Royal Marines and Infantry regiments which served alongside naval crews. It also looks at the organisation, training and recruitment of the force and corrects a number of misconceptions regarding impressment and training.

The Russian Army of the Napoleonic Wars (1)

by Philip Haythornthwaite Paul Hannon

In 1795 the Russian army was as vast as the territory from which it was drawn. The College of War calculated that the regular army amounted to 541,741 men, plus 46,601 enrolled cossacks, and at least a further 100,000 irregular cavalry which could be mobilised in time of war. Inspired by the icons paraded by their priests before battle, the Russian infantry were capable of astonishing feats and total, blind obedience to orders. Philip Haythornwaite examines the organisation and uniforms of the remarkable Russian infantry troops who fought in the Napoleonic Wars (1799-1815).

The Russian Army of the Napoleonic Wars (2)

by Philip Haythornthwaite Bryan Fosten

During the Napoleonic era, Russia possessed a vast force of cavalry, forming a greater percentage than that of most European armies. This stemmed partly from their service against the Turks, who had huge numbers of troops, and partly from the fact that much Russian terrain was suitable for the manoeuvre of large bodies of cavalry. This companion volume to Men-at-Arms 185 examines the organisation, tactics and uniforms of the Russian cavalry during this dynamic and turbulent period, covering Cuirassiers, Dragoons, Hussars, Uhlans, Mounted Jägers and the Lifeguard, as well as the Opolchenie militia and Cossacks.

Wellington's Specialist Troops

by Bryan Fosten Philip Haythornthwaite

The specialist troops of Wellington's army played a crucial role in the success of the British Army. Though often understaffed and ineptly managed, the artillery, engineers, transport and commissariat, and medical services contributed to Wellington's ultimate victory in 1815. The Royal Artillery and Corps of Royal Engineers comprised a small number of highly trained officers, while the commissariat was composed of untrained civilians outside military discipline, and the medical services suffered from a shortage of trained surgeons. This richly illustrated book examines the organization, uniforms and equipment of each of these specialist departments.

Showing 1 through 19 of 19 results

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