Browse Results What Format Should I Choose?

Showing 1 through 25 of 52 results
Previous   Page: 1 2 3   Next

Brave New Worlds: Dystopian Stories

by Ursula K. Le Guin Kate Wilhelm Orson Scott Card Shirley Jackson Ray Bradbury Neil Gaiman Philip K. Dick Cory Doctorow Carrie Vaughn Kurt Vonnegut Jr. Paolo Bacigalupi

Brave New Worlds collects over 30 of the best tales of dystopian menace by some of today's visionary writers.

Clans of the Alphane Moon

by Philip K. Dick

On a planet run by escapees from a mental institution, the doctors who arrive to restore order may be the craziest of all. For years, the third moon in the Alphane system was used as a psychiatric hospital. But when war broke out between Earth and the Alphanes, the hospital was left unguarded and the inmates set up their own society, made up of competing factions based around each mental illness. When Earth sends a delegation to take back the colony, they find enclaves of depressives, schizophrenics, paranoiacs, and other mentally ill people coming together to repel what they see as a foreign invasion. Meanwhile, back on Earth, CIA agent Chuck Rittersdorf and his wife Mary are going through a bitter divorce, with Chuck losing everything. But when Chuck is assigned to clandestinely control an android accompanying Mary to the Alphane moon, he sees an opportunity to get his revenge.

The Collected Stories of Philip K. Dick, Volume 3: Second Variety

by Philip K. Dick

Many thousands of readers consider Philip K. Dick the greatest science fiction mind on any planet. Since his untimely death in 1982, interest in Dick's works has continued to mount and his reputation has been further enhanced by a growing body of critical attention. The Philip K. Dick Award is now given annually to a distinguished work of science fiction, and the Philip K. Dick Society is devoted to the study and promulgation of his works.<P><P> This collection includes all of the writer's earliest short and medium-length fiction (including some previously unpublished stories) covering the years 1952-1955. These fascinating stories include Second Variety, Foster, You're Dead and The Father-Thing, and many others.

Confessions of a Crap Artist

by Philip K. Dick

"A funny, horribly accurate portrait of a life in California in the Fifties."--Rolling Stone Jack Isidore doesn't see the world like most people. According to his brother-in-law Charlie, he's a crap artist, obsessed with his own bizarre theories and ideas, which he fanatically records in his many notebooks. He is so grossly unequipped for real life that his sister and brother-in-law feel compelled to rescue him from it. But while Fay and Charlie Hume put on a happy face for the world, they prove to be just as sealed off from reality, in thrall to obsessions that are slightly more acceptable than Jack's but a great deal uglier. Their constant fighting and betrayals threaten their own marriage and the relationships of everyone around them. When they bring Jack into their home, he finds himself in the middle of a maelstrom of suburban angst from which he might not be able to escape. Confessions of a Crap Artist is one of Philip K. Dick's most accomplished novels, and the only non-science fiction novel published in his lifetime.

The Cosmic Puppets

by Philip K. Dick

Following an inexplicable urge, Ted Barton returns to his idyllic Virginia hometown for a vacation, but when he gets there, he is shocked to discover that the town has utterly changed. The stores and houses are all different and he doesn't recognize anybody. The mystery deepens when he checks the town's historical records . . . and reads that he died nearly twenty years earlier. As he attempts to uncover the secrets of the town, Barton is drawn deeper into the puzzle, and into a supernatural battle that could decide the fate of the universe.

Counter-Clock World

by Philip K. Dick

"Dick is the American writer who in recent years has most influenced non-American poets, novelists, and essayists."--Roberto Bolaño In Counter-Clock World, time has begun moving backward. People greet each other with "goodbye," blow smoke into cigarettes, and rise from the dead. When one of those rising dead is the famous and powerful prophet Anarch Peak, a number of groups start a mad scramble to find him first--but their motives are not exactly benevolent because Anarch Peak may just be worth more dead than alive, and these groups will do whatever they must to send him back to the grave. What would you do if your long-dead relatives started coming back? Who would take care of them? And what if they preferred being dead? In Counter-Clock World, one of Dick's most theological and philosophical novels, these troubling questions are addressed; though, as always, you may have to figure out the answers yourself.

The Crack in Space

by Philip K. Dick

"Dick's best books always describe a future that is both entirely recognizable and utterly unimaginable."--The New York Times Book Review When a repairman accidentally discovers a parallel universe, everyone sees it as an opportunity, whether as a way to ease Earth's overcrowding, set up a personal kingdom, or hide an inconvenient mistress. But when a civilization is found already living there, the people on this side of the crack are sent scrambling to discover their motives. Will these parallel humans come in peace, or are they just as corrupt and ill-intentioned as the people of this world?

Deus Irae

by Philip K. Dick Roger Zelazny

An artist searches for God so he can paint his portrait in Philip K. Dick's collaboration with Roger Zelazny. After World War III, the Servants of Wrath cult deified the mysterious Carlton Lufteufel, creator of the doomsday weapon that wiped out much of humanity. But to worship the man, they need an image of him as a god, and no one has ever seen him. So the high priests send a limbless master painter named Tibor McMasters into the wilderness on a mission to find Lufteufel and capture his likeness. Unfortunately for Tibor, the nation's remaining Christians do not want him to succeed and are willing to kill to ensure that the so-called Deus Irae remains hidden. This hallucinatory tale through a nuclear wasteland asks what price the artist must pay for art and tries to figure out just what makes a god.

The Divine Invasion

by Philip K. Dick

God is not dead, he has merely been exiled to an extraterrestrial planet. And it is on this planet that God meets Herb Asher and convinces him to help retake Earth from the demonic Belial. Featuring virtual reality, parallel worlds, and interstellar travel, The Divine Invasion blends philosophy and adventure in a way few authors can achieve.As the middle novel of Dick's VALIS trilogy, The Divine Invasion plays a pivotal role in answering the questions raised by the first novel, expanding that world while exploring just how much anyone can really know--even God himself.

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

by Philip K. Dick

"The most consistently brilliant science fiction writer in the world."--John BrunnerTHE INSPIRATION FOR BLADERUNNER. . .Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? was published in 1968. Grim and foreboding, even today it is a masterpiece ahead of its time.By 2021, the World War had killed millions, driving entire species into extinction and sending mankind off-planet. Those who remained coveted any living creature, and for people who couldn't afford one, companies built incredibly realistic simulacrae: horses, birds, cats, sheep. . . They even built humans.Emigrées to Mars received androids so sophisticated it was impossible to tell them from true men or women. Fearful of the havoc these artificial humans could wreak, the government banned them from Earth. But when androids didn't want to be identified, they just blended in. Rick Deckard was an officially sanctioned bounty hunter whose job was to find rogue androids, and to retire them. But cornered, androids tended to fight back, with deadly results."[Dick] sees all the sparkling and terrifying possibilities. . . that other authors shy away from."--Paul Williams, Rolling StoneFrom the Trade Paperback edition.

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (Mandarin Edition)

by Philip K. Dick

A Simon & Schuster eBook. Simon & Schuster has a great book for every reader.

Dr. Bloodmoney

by Philip K. Dick

"A masterpiece."--Roberto Bolaño What happens after the bombs drop? This is the troubling question Philip K. Dick addresses with Dr. Bloodmoney, or How We Got Along After the Bomb. It is the story of a world reeling from the effects of nuclear annihilation and fallout, a world where mutated humans and animals are the norm, and the scattered survivors take comfort from a disc jockey endlessly circling the globe in a broken-down satellite. And hidden amongst the survivors is Dr. Bloodmoney himself, the man responsible for it all. This bizarre cast of characters cajole, seduce, and backstab in their attempts to get ahead in what is left of the world, consequences and casualties be damned. A sort of companion to Dr. Strangelove, an unofficial and unhinged sequel, Dick's novel is just as full of dark comedy and just as chilling.

Dr. Futurity

by Philip K. Dick

In a future where death is embraced, a time-traveling doctor is the only one who can save a wounded resistance leader. When Dr. Jim Parsons wakes up from a car accident, he finds himself in a future populated almost entirely by the young. But to keep the world run by the young, death is fetishized, and those who survive to old age are put down. In such a world, Parsons--with his innate desire to save lives--is a criminal and outcast. But for one revolutionary group, he may be just the savior they need to heal and revive their cryogenically frozen leader. And when he and the group journey to 1500s California, what they find causes them to question what they know about history and the underpinnings of their society. With the jarring immediacy of a car crash, Philip K. Dick throws both the reader and protagonist of Dr. Futurity into a bizarre future where healing is a crime and youth rules.

The Exegesis of Philip K. Dick

by Philip K. Dick Jonathan Lethem Pamela Jackson

"A great and calamitous sequence of arguments with the universe: poignant, terrifying, ludicrous, and brilliant. The Exegesis is the sort of book associated with legends and madmen, but Dick wasn't a legend and he wasn't mad. He lived among us, and was a genius."--Jonathan Lethem. Based on thousands of pages of typed and handwritten notes, journal entries, letters, and story sketches, The Exegesis of Philip K. Dick is the magnificent and imaginative final work of an author who dedicated his life to questioning the nature of reality and perception, the malleability of space and time, and the relationship between the human and the divine. Edited and introduced by Pamela Jackson and Jonathan Lethem, this will be the definitive presentation of Dick's brilliant, and epic, final work. In The Exegesis, Dick documents his eight-year attempt to fathom what he called "2-3-74," a postmodern visionary experience of the entire universe "transformed into information." In entries that sometimes ran to hundreds of pages, Dick tried to write his way into the heart of a cosmic mystery that tested his powers of imagination and invention to the limit, adding to, revising, and discarding theory after theory, mixing in dreams and visionary experiences as they occurred, and pulling it all together in three late novels known as the VALIS trilogy. In this abridgment, Jackson and Lethem serve as guides, taking the reader through the Exegesis and establishing connections with moments in Dick's life and work. The e-book includes a sample chapter from A Scanner Darkly by Philip K. Dick.

Eye in the Sky

by Philip K. Dick

"I have never seen [its] theme handled with greater technical dexterity or given more psychological meaning."--Fantasy and Science FictionWhen a routine tour of a particle accelerator goes awry, Jack Hamilton and the rest of his tour group find themselves in a world ruled by Old Testament morality, where the smallest infraction can bring about a plague of locusts. Escape from that world is not the end, though, as they plunge into a Communist dystopia and a world where everything is an enemy.Philip K. Dick was aggressively individualistic and no worldview is safe from his acerbic and hilarious take downs. Eye in the Sky blends the thrills and the jokes to craft a startling morality lesson hidden inside a comedy.

The Father-Thing

by Philip K. Dick

In The Father-Thing, a young boy named Charlie discovers that the man he has believed to be his father is actually not his real father. The man who comes home from work, kisses his mother, sits down to dinner, makes comments about his day and the like may look like the actual Mr. Walton, but Charlie knows better. Charlie alone knows the real and hideous secret--that his real father has been killed and that the being pretending to be his father is actually an alien that has taken over his body and usurped his father's life. It is no longer Charlie's father; instead, it is the "Father-Thing". The Father-Thing is a familiar premise, especially popular in the 1950s, that continues to hold our interest. It expresses the fear that people are not what they appear to be on the surface. The idea is that something sinister may be lurking beneath the facade of suburban complacency. And here, Dick's story has a more personal focus than most. This story focuses not on the invasion of a whole community but instead on the invasion of one particular family. The alien takeover serves as a metaphor for estrangement. The Father-Thing represents the seemingly inscrutable motives that can undermine and damage one family's household and stability. Dick's story, then, is both a chilling science fiction tale and an emotionally resonant work about a child's coming to terms with the turmoil within his own family. Where Charlie turns when he finds himself outcast from his own home is somewhat surprising and reveals a great deal about Dick's ideas about community and exile.

Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said

by Philip K. Dick

"Dick skillfully explores the psychological ramifications of this nightmare."--The New York Times Review of Books Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said grapples with many of the themes Philip K. Dick is best known for-- identity, altered reality, drug use, and dystopia--in a rollicking chase story that earned the novel the John W. Campbell Award and nominations for the Hugo and Nebula. Jason Taverner--world-famous talk show host and man-about-town--wakes up one day to find that no one knows who he is--including the vast databases of the totalitarian government. And in a society where lack of identification is a crime, Taverner has no choice but to go on the run with a host of shady characters, including crooked cops and dealers of alien drugs. But do they know more than they are letting on? And just how can a person's identity be erased overnight?

Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said (Mandarin Edition)

by Philip K. Dick

Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said grapples with many of the themes Philip K. Dick is best known for-- identity, altered reality, drug use, and dystopia--in a rollicking chase story that earned the novel the John W. Campbell Award and nominations for the Hugo and Nebula. 10月11日 杰森*塔夫纳还是一个拥有三千万粉丝的大明星 10月12日 他却躺在一家破旅馆的房间里 还被抹去了所有个人资料 在一个缺乏身份证明就是犯罪的国度里 他不得不在混沌中摸索 全力追踪事实真相 小说描述了一个处于国民警卫队和警察专制统治下的社会 内中交织着名人效应,基因改造,时空扭曲和泛滥毒品 探索了爱和人性的本质 于1975年获得坎贝尔奖 并获雨果奖和星云奖提名

Galactic Pot-Healer

by Philip K. Dick

A powerful and enigmatic alien recruits humans and aliens to help it restore a sunken cathedral in this touching and hilarious novel. Sometimes even gods need help. In Galactic Pot-Healer that god is an alien creature known as The Glimmung, which looks alternately like a flaming wheel, a teenage girl, and a swirling mass of ocean life. In order to raise a sunken city, he summons beings from across the galaxy to Plowman's Planet. Joe Fernwright is one of those summoned, needed for his skills at pot-healing--repairing broken ceramics. But from the moment Joe arrives on Plowman's Planet, things start to go awry. Told as only Philip K. Dick can, Galactic Pot-Healer is a wildly funny tale of aliens, gods, and ceramics.

The Game-Players of Titan

by Philip K. Dick

Years ago, Earth and Titan fought a war and Earth lost. The planet was irradiated and most of the surviving population is sterile. The few survivors play an intricate and unending game called Bluff at the behest of the slug-like aliens who rule the planet. At stake in the game are two very important commodities: land and spouses. Pete Garden just lost his wife and Berkeley, California, but he has a plan to win them back. That is, if he isn't derailed by aliens, psychic traitors, or his new wife. The Game-Players of Titan is both satire and adventure, examining the ties that bind people together and the maddening peccadilloes of bureaucracy, whether the bureaucrats are humans or alien slugs.

Gather Yourselves Together

by Philip K. Dick

Gather Yourselves Together is one of Philip K. Dick's earliest novels, written when he was just twenty-four years old. It tells the story of three Americans left behind in China by their employer, biding their time as the Communists advance. As they while away the days, both the young and naïve Carl Fitter and the older and worldly Verne Tildon vie for the affections of Barbara Mahler, a woman who may not be so tough-as-nails as she acts. But Carl's innocence and Verne's boorishness could end up driving Barbara away from both.

Lies, Inc.

by Philip K. Dick

"Philip K. Dick knew better than anyone how to recognize the disturbances of exile."--Roberto BolañoWhen catastrophic overpopulation threatens Earth, one company offers to teleport citizens to Whale's Mouth, an allegedly pristine new home for happy and industrious émigrés. But there is one problem: the teleportation machine only works in one direction. When Rachmael ben Applebaum discovers that some of the footage of happy settlers may have been faked, he sets out on an eighteen-year journey to see if anyone wants to come back. Lies, Inc. is one of Philip K. Dick's final novels, which he expanded from his novella The Unteleported Man shortly before his death. In its examination of totalitarianism, reality, and hallucination, it encompasses everything that Dick's fans love about his oeuvre.

The Man in the High Castle

by Philip K. Dick

"The single most resonant and carefully imagined book of Dick's career." - New York TimesIt's America in 1962. Slavery is legal once again. The few Jews who still survive hide under assumed names. In San Francisco, the I Ching is as common as the Yellow Pages. All because some twenty years earlier the United States lost a war--and is now occupied by Nazi Germany and Japan.This harrowing, Hugo Award-winning novel is the work that established Philip K. Dick as an innovator in science fiction while breaking the barrier between science fiction and the serious novel of ideas. In it Dick offers a haunting vision of history as a nightmare from which it may just be possible to wake.Winner of the Hugo Award

The Man in the High Castle (Mandarin Edition)

by Philip K. Dick

It's America in 1962. Slavery is legal once again. The few Jews who still survive hide under assumed names. In San Francisco, the I Ching is as common as the Yellow Pages. All because some twenty years earlier the United States lost a war--and is now occupied by Nazi Germany and Japan.小说以 易经 牵引情节 通过对不同阶层,不同身份的人物的穿插描述 讲述了一个反转过来的 历史----同盟国在二战中战败 美国被德国和日本分割霸占 探讨了正义与非正义,文化自卑和身份认同 以及法西斯独裁和种族歧视给人类社会造成的后果 通过对一系列不同人物的塑造 菲利普*迪克讲述了真实和虚幻的生活及历史

The Man Who Japed

by Philip K. Dick

Following a devastating nuclear war, the Moral Reclamation government took over the world and forced its citizens to live by strictly puritanical rules--no premarital sex, drunkenness, or displaying of neon signs--all of which are reinforced through a constant barrage of messaging to the public. The chief purveyor of these messages is Alan Purcell, next in line to become head of the propaganda bureau. But there is just one problem: a statue of the government's founder has been vandalized and the head is hidden in Purcell's closet. In this buttoned-up society, maybe all a revolution needs is one really great prank . . .

Showing 1 through 25 of 52 results
Previous   Page: 1 2 3   Next

Help

Select your format based upon: 1) how you want to read your book, and 2) compatibility with your reading tool. To learn more about using Bookshare with your device, visit the "Using Bookshare" page in the Help Center.

Here is an overview of the specialized formats that Bookshare offers its members with links that go to the Help Center for more information.

  • Bookshare Web Reader - a customized reading tool for Bookshare members offering all the features of DAISY with a single click of the "Read Now" link.
  • DAISY (Digital Accessible Information System) - a digital book file format. DAISY books from Bookshare are DAISY 3.0 text files that work with just about every type of access technology that reads text. Books that contain images will have the download option of ‘DAISY Text with Images’.
  • BRF (Braille Refreshable Format) - digital Braille for use with refreshable Braille devices and Braille embossers.
  • MP3 (Mpeg audio layer 3) - Provides audio only with no text. These books are created with a text-to-speech engine and spoken by Kendra, a high quality synthetic voice from Ivona. Any device that supports MP3 playback is compatible.
  • DAISY Audio - Similar to the Daisy 3.0 option above; however, this option uses MP3 files created with our text-to-speech engine that utilizes Ivona's Kendra voice. This format will work with Daisy Audio compatible players such as Victor Reader Stream and Read2Go.