Browse Results What Format Should I Choose?

Showing 1 through 12 of 12 results Export list as .CSV

A Conservationist Manifesto

by Scott Russell Sanders

As an antidote to the destructive culture of consumption dominating American life today, Scott Russell Sanders calls for a culture of conservation that allows us to savor and preserve the world, instead of devouring it. How might we shift to a more durable and responsible way of life? What changes in values and behavior will be required? Ranging geographically from southern Indiana to the Boundary Waters Wilderness and culturally from the Bible to billboards, Sanders extends the visions of Henry David Thoreau, John Muir, and Rachel Carson to our own day. A Conservationist Manifesto shows the crucial relevance of a conservation ethic at a time of mounting concern about global climate change, depletion of natural resources, extinction of species, and the economic inequities between rich and poor nations. The important message of this powerful book is that conservation is not simply a personal virtue but a public one.

Dancing in Dreamtime

by Scott Russell Sanders

Fans today may be surprised to learn Scott Russell Sanders was previously one of the brightest science-fiction newcomers of the 1980s. In Dancing in Dreamtime, he returns to his roots, exploring both inner and outer space in a speculative collection of short stories. At a time when humankind faces unprecedented, global-scale challenges from climate change, loss of biodiversity, dwindling vital resources, and widespread wars, this collection of planetary tales will strike a poignant chord with the reader. Sanders has created worlds where death tolls rise due to dream deprivation, where animals only exist in mechanical form, and where poisoned air forces people to live in biodomes. Never before has Sanders's writing been so relevant and never before have the lessons in these stories been so important.

Earth Works

by Scott Russell Sanders

In the hands of award-winning writer Scott Russell Sanders, the essay becomes an inquisitive and revelatory form of art. In 30 of his finest essays--nine never before collected--Sanders examines his Midwestern background, his father's drinking, his opposition to war, his literary inheritance, and his feeling for wildness. He also tackles such vital issues as the disruption of Earth's climate, the impact of technology, the mystique of money, the ideology of consumerism, and the meaning of sustainability. Throughout, he asks perennial questions: What is a good life? How do family and culture shape a person's character? How should we treat one another and the Earth? What is our role in the cosmos? Readers and writers alike will find wisdom and inspiration in Sanders's luminous and thought-provoking prose.

The Floating House

by Scott Russell Sanders

In 1815, the McClures sail their flatboat from Pittsburgh down the Ohio River and settle in what would later become Indiana.

For the Health of the Land: Previously Unpublished Essays And Other Writings

by Aldo Leopold Scott Russell Sanders J. Baird Callicott Eric T. Freyfogle

Aldo Leopold's classic work A Sand County Almanac is widely regarded as one of the most influential conservation books of all time. In it, Leopold sets forth an eloquent plea for the development of a "land ethic" -- a belief that humans have a duty to interact with the soils, waters, plants, and animals that collectively comprise "the land" in ways that ensure their well-being and survival.For the Health of the Land, a new collection of rare and previously unpublished essays by Leopold, builds on that vision of ethical land use and develops the concept of "land health" and the practical measures landowners can take to sustain it. The writings are vintage Leopold -- clear, sensible, and provocative, sometimes humorous, often lyrical, and always inspiring. Joining them together are a wisdom and a passion that transcend the time and place of the author's life.The book offers a series of forty short pieces, arranged in seasonal "almanac" form, along with longer essays, arranged chronologically, which show the development of Leopold's approach to managing private lands for conservation ends. The final essay is a never before published work, left in pencil draft at his death, which proposes the concept of land health as an organizing principle for conservation. Also featured is an introduction by noted Leopold scholars J. Baird Callicott and Eric T. Freyfogle that provides a brief biography of Leopold and places the essays in the context of his life and work, and an afterword by conservation biologist Stanley A. Temple that comments on Leopold's ideas from the perspective of modern wildlife management.The book's conservation message and practical ideas are as relevant today as they were when first written over fifty years ago. For the Health of the Land represents a stunning new addition to the literary legacy of Aldo Leopold.

The Force of Spirit

by Scott Russell Sanders

Scott Russel Sanders reveals how the pressure of the sacred breaks through the surface of ordinary life -- a life devoted to grown-up children and aging parents, the craft of writing and the natural world. Whether writing to his daughter or to his son as each prepares to get married, or describing an encounter with a red-tailed hawk in whose form he glimpses his father, or praising the disciplines of writing and carpentry and teaching. Sanders registers, in finely tuned prose, the "Force of the Spirit".

Hunting for Hope: A Father's Journeys

by Scott Russell Sanders

In a narrative threaded with the moving story of his father-son trip, Sanders sets out to accumulate his own reasons for hope. These richly examined medicine bundles of hope, Scott Russell Sanders brings all of his considerable powers as an elegant writer of prose.

The Paradise of Bombs

by Scott Russell Sanders

Winner of the Associated Writing Programs Award for Creative Nonfiction. The pieces gathered in this book are essays, by which I mean they are experiments in making sense of things, and they are personal, by which I mean the voice speaking is the nearest I can come to my own voice.

A Place Called Freedom

by Thomas B. Allen Scott Russell Sanders

A tribute to all who struggle for freedom. When young James Starman and his slave family are set free, they travel north to Indiana where they build a house, a farm, and a new life for themselves. In those years before the Civil War, Papa keeps making dangerous trips back to Tennessee, bringing back aunts and cousins and friends. So many people arrive that soon, they form a village. But what to call such a fine town where former slaves have gathered to build their lives afresh? What else, but Freedom. Inspired by the true story of the founding of Lyles Station, Indiana, A Place Called Freedom celebrates the courage, compassion, and wisdom that create strong communities.

A Private History of Awe

by Scott Russell Sanders

An original and searching memoir. When Scott Russell Sanders was four, his father held him in his arms during a thunderstorm, and he felt awe -- "the tingle of a power that surges through bone and rain and everything". "A Private History of Awe" is an account of his search, told as a series of dramatic, spiritually charged episodes. His early memory of watching a fire with his father; his attraction to the solemn cadences of the Bible despite his frustration with Sunday-school religion; his discovery of books and the body; his mounting opposition to the Vietnam War and all forms of violence; his decision, after the heady experience of education at Brown and Cambridge, to return to the Midwest and raise a family in the place of his roots. In many ways, this is the story of a generation's passage through the 1960s -- from innocence to experience, from euphoria to disillusionment. But Sanders has found a language that captures the transcendence in ordinary lives while never resorting to formula. And by framing his recollections with present-day accounts of tending to his ailing mother and his newborn granddaughter, he weaves his story into the larger history of his family, illuminating the cycles of life that bind together generations. In his hands, the pattern of American coming of age made classic by writers from Mark Twain to Tobias Wolff is given a powerful new charge.

Terrarium

by Scott Russell Sanders

With round-the-clock drugs, games, and eros parlors to entertain them and virtual weather to sustain them, humans live inside a global network of domed cities known collectively as "the Enclosure. " Having poisoned the biosphere, we've had to close ourselves off from the Earth. The cities of the Enclosure are scattered around the globe on the land and sea, and are connected by a web of travel tubes, so no one needs to risk exposure. Health Patrollers police the boundaries of the Enclosure to keep the mutants and pollution out. Phoenix Marshall decodes satellite images for a living. He has spent all 30 years of his life in Oregon City, afloat on the Pacific Ocean. He busies himself with work and various forms of recreation to keep boredom at bay. One morning he opens his door to find Teeg Passio. Teeg is the same age as Phoenix, but she's different; she's menacingly and enticingly wild. She grew up on the outside. Her mother oversaw the recycling of the old cities, and her father helped design the Enclosure. Teeg works maintenance, which allows her to travel outside the walls. When she introduces Phoenix to her crew, he is drawn into a high-tech conspiracy that may threaten everything he understands. Are humans really better off within the Enclosure? Is the Earth? Are Health Patrollers keeping us safe or just keeping us in? Teeg seduces Phoenix out of his orderly life, enlisting him in a secret, political and sexual rebellion. Teeg and her co-conspirators, part mystics, part tech-wizards, dream of a life embedded in nature. Then one day, during a closely monitored repair mission on the outside, a typhoon offers the rebels a chance to escape the Enclosure and test their utopian dreams in the wilds.

Wilderness Plots: Tales about the Settlement of the American Land

by Scott Russell Sanders Dennis B. Meehan

Wilderness Plots is made up of fifty brief tales that chronicle the period of settlement of the Ohio Valley. Written with the power and compression of folklore, these tales bring to life the unmemorialized common folks who carried out this epic adventure.

Showing 1 through 12 of 12 results Export list as .CSV

Help

Select your format based upon: 1) how you want to read your book, and 2) compatibility with your reading tool. To learn more about using Bookshare with your device, visit the Help Center.

Here is an overview of the specialized formats that Bookshare offers its members with links that go to the Help Center for more information.

  • Bookshare Web Reader - a customized reading tool for Bookshare members offering all the features of DAISY with a single click of the "Read Now" link.
  • DAISY (Digital Accessible Information System) - a digital book file format. DAISY books from Bookshare are DAISY 3.0 text files that work with just about every type of access technology that reads text. Books that contain images will have the download option of ‘DAISY Text with Images’.
  • BRF (Braille Refreshable Format) - digital Braille for use with refreshable Braille devices and Braille embossers.
  • MP3 (Mpeg audio layer 3) - Provides audio only with no text. These books are created with a text-to-speech engine and spoken by Kendra, a high quality synthetic voice from Ivona. Any device that supports MP3 playback is compatible.
  • DAISY Audio - Similar to the Daisy 3.0 option above; however, this option uses MP3 files created with our text-to-speech engine that utilizes Ivonas Kendra voice. This format will work with Daisy Audio compatible players such as Victor Reader Stream and Read2Go.