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La aventura sin fin

by T. S. Eliot

Además de uno de los grandes poetas del XX, T.S. Eliot fue el crítico más ambicioso y exhaustivo de su generación. Desde la primera década del siglo pasado hasta su muerte en 1965, ejerció una rotunda autoridad en la literatura anglosajona que le llevó a revisar toda la literatura occidental: desde Virgilio, Dante y los isabelinos hasta Donne, los románticos y Yeats con el secreto propósito de acreditar la revolución poética que llevó a cabo con La tierra baldía o Cuatro cuartetos.El presente volumen propone un recorrido cronológico por los ensayos más importantes y menos divulgados en español que el poeta escribió entre 1919 y 1961. Dueño de una intimidante cultura, capaz de encararse a los más grandes aunque se llamen Shakespeare o Milton, inigualable lector del detalle, provocador insaciable, Eliot se demuestra todavía en estas páginas como el verdadero guía, señor y maestro de la modernidad.

Christianity and Culture

by T. S. Eliot

One of our most prized writers takes a poignant look at the powerful influences of religion and culture in the Western world in these two penetrating essays. The first, The Idea of a Christian Society, examines the undeniable link between religion, politics, and economy, suggesting that a real Christian society requires a direct criticism of political and economic systems. And in Notes towards the Definition of Culture, Eliot sets out to discover the true definition of "culture," a word whose misuse and ambiguity presents a danger to the legacy of the Western world. Intellectually, Eliot was years ahead of his time, and these essays are an invaluable tool for analyzing and understanding the nature of society today.

Christianity and Culture: The Idea of a Christian Society and Notes Towards the Definition of Culture

by T. S. Eliot

Two long essays: "The Idea of a Christian Society" on the direction of religious thought toward criticism of political and economic systems; and "Notes towards the Definition of Culture" on culture, its meaning, and the dangers threatening the legacy of the Western world.

The Cocktail Party

by T. S. Eliot

A comedic play about the universal quest for meaning, written in some of Eliot's "most beautiful poetry" (The New York Times). A sterling example of contemporary theater, The Cocktail Party is a dramatic tour de force from one of our greatest writers to date.

Collected Poems: 1909-1962

by T. S. Eliot

Published two years before his death, this collection includes all of Eliot's poetry that he wished to preserve.

Collected Poems, 1909-1962

by T. S. Eliot

There is no more authoritative collection of the poetry that Eliot himself wished to preserve than this volume, published two years before his death in 1965. Poet, dramatist, critic, and editor, T. S. Eliot was one of the defining figures of twentieth-century poetry. This edition of Collected Poems 1909-1962 includes his verse from Prufrock and Other Observations (1917) to Four Quartets (1943), and includes such literary landmarks as The Waste Land and Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats.

The Complete Plays of T. S. Eliot

by T. S. Eliot

T. S. Eliot's plays--Murder in the Cathedral, The Family Reunion, The Cocktail Party, The Confidential Clerk, and The Elder Statesman--are brought together for the first time in this volume. They summarize the Nobel Prize winner's achievements in restoring dramatic verse to the English and the American stage, an effort of great significance both for the theater and for the development of Mr. Eliot's art. Between 1935, when Murder in the Cathedral was first produced at the Canterbury Festival, and 1958, when The Elder Statesman opened at the Edinburgh Festival prior to engagements in London and New York, T. S. Eliot had given three other plays to the theater. His paramount concerns can be traced through all five plays. They have been said to be closely related, marking stages in the development of a new and individual form of drama, in which the poet worked out his intention "to take a form of entertainment, and subject it to the process that would leave it a form of art." What Mark Van Doren said, in reviewing Murder in the Cathedral in The Nation, is true of all these plays: "Mr. Eliot adapts himself to the stage with dignity, simplicity, and skill."

Complete Poems and Plays,

by T. S. Eliot

T. S. Eliot is perhaps also the most important figure in the modern poetic tradition. "In ten years' time," wrote Edmund Wilson in Axel's Castle, "Eliot has left upon English poetry a mark more unmistakable than that of any other poet writing in English." In 1948 Mr. Eliot was awarded the Nobel Prize "for his work as a trail-blazing pioneer of modern poetry." For enjoyment of one of the great poetic talents in contemporary literature and for a deeper understanding of such classics as "The Waste Land," "The Hollow Men," "Ash Wednesday," "Prufrock," "Murder in the Cathedral," and "The Cocktail Party," The Complete Poems and Plays of T. S. Eliot is indispensable.

The Confidential Clerk

by T. S. Eliot

A motley play of family mysteries, The Confidential Clerk follows Sir Claude and Lady Elizabeth as they reconnect with their long-lost illegitimate children--even though they aren't quite certain whose child is whose. "Extraordinarily good fun," this is one of Eliot's greatest comedies, full of wit, crisp dialogue, and parental hijinks laced with some of Eliot's finest poetry and existential reveries (The Atlantic).

Essays Ancient and Modern

by T. S. Eliot

A collection of essays grappling with some of the most significant topics of our time, Essays Ancient and Modern reveals Eliot's thoughts on his literary contemporaries and predecessors, the role of religion in a secular society, and the continuing tradition of the classics in modern education. Astute and erudite, here we see the inner thoughts of one of our greatest minds, articulated in some of his most eloquent and direct prose.

Essays on Elizabethan Drama

by T. S. Eliot

Touching on everyone from Marlowe to Middleton, Essays on Elizabethan Drama is a rigorous collection of Eliot's works on the great dramatists of the 16th century.

The Family Reunion

by T. S. Eliot

A modern verse play dealing with the problem of man's guilt and his need for expiation through his acceptance of responsibility for the sin of humanity. "What poets and playwrights have been fumbling at in their desire to put poetry into drama and drama into poetry has here been realized.... This is the finest verse play since the Elizabethans" (New York Times).

Four Quartets

by T. S. Eliot

The last major verse written by Nobel laureate T. S. Eliot, considered by Eliot himself to be his finest work Four Quartets is a rich composition that expands the spiritual vision introduced in "The Waste Land." Here, in four linked poems ("Burnt Norton," "East Coker," "The Dry Salvages," and "Little Gidding"), spiritual, philosophical, and personal themes emerge through symbolic allusions and literary and religious references from both Eastern and Western thought. It is the culminating achievement by a man considered the greatest poet of the twentieth century and one of the seminal figures in the evolution of modernism.

The Idea of a Christian Society

by T. S. Eliot

These three lectures by the renowned poet and playwright T. S. Eliot address the direction of religious thought toward criticism of political and economic systems. They were originally delivered in March 1939 at Corpus Christi College.

The Letters of T. S. Eliot

by T. S. Eliot

This fifth volume of the collected letters of poet, playwright, essayist, and literary critic Thomas Stearns Eliot covers the years 1930 through 1931. It was during this period that the acclaimed American-born writer earnestly embraced his newly avowed Anglo-Catholic faith, a decision that earned him the antagonism of friends like Virginia Woolf and Herbert Read. Also evidenced in these correspondences is Eliot's growing estrangement from his wife Vivien, with the writer's newfound dedication to the Anglican Church exacerbating the unhappiness of an already tormented union. Yet despite his personal trials, this period was one of great literary activity for Eliot. In 1930 he composed the poems Ash-Wednesday and Marina, and published Coriolan and a translation of Saint-John Perse's Anabase the following year. As director at the British publishing house Faber & Faber and editor of The Criterion, he encouraged W. H. Auden, Stephen Spender, Louis MacNeice, and Ralph Hogdson, published James Joyce's Haveth Childers Everywhere, and turned down a book proposal from Eric Blair, better known by his pen name, George Orwell. Through Eliot's correspondences from this time the reader gets a full-bodied view of a great artist at a personal, professional, and spiritual crossroads.

Murder in the Cathedral

by T. S. Eliot

T. S. Eliot's verse dramatization of the murder of Thomas Becket at Canterbury, winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature The Archbishop Thomas Becket speaks fatal words before he is martyred in T. S. Eliot's best-known drama, based on the murder of the Archbishop of Canterbury in 1170. Praised for its poetically masterful handling of issues of faith, politics, and the common good, T. S. Eliot's play bolstered his reputation as the most significant poet of his time.

Notes towards the Definition of Culture

by T. S. Eliot

The word culture, in recent years, has been widely and erroneously employed in political, educational, and journalistic contexts. In helping to define a word so greatly misused, T. S. Eliot contradicts many of our popular assumptions about culture, reminding us that it is not the possession of a class but of a whole society and yet its preservation may depend on the continuance of a class system, and that a "classless" society may be a society in which culture has ceased to exist. Surveying the contemporary scene, Mr. Eliot points out that our standards of culture are lower than they were fifty years ago, finds evidence of this decay in every department of human activity, and sees no reason why the decay of culture should not proceed much further. He suggests that culture and religion have a common root and that if one decays the other may die too. He reminds us that "the Russians have been the first modern people to practise the political direction of culture consciously, and to attack at every point the culture of any people whom they wish to dominate." The appendix includes his broadcasts to Europe, ending with a plea to preserve the legacy of Greece, Rome, and Israel, and Europe's legacy throughout the last 2,000 years. "Behind the urbanity, the modesty, the mere good manners of Mr. Eliot's exposition, one cannot mistake the force and significance of what he has to say, or ignore that it constitutes a fundamental attack on most of our assumptions on the subject."--THE LONDON SPECTATOR

Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats

by T. S. Eliot

Cats! Some are sane, some are mad and some are good and some are bad. Meet magical Mr Mistoffelees, sleepy Old Deuteronomy and curious Rum Tum Tugger. But you'll be lucky to meet Macavity because Macavity's not there!In 1925 T. S. Eliot became co-director of Faber and Faber, who remain his publishers to this day. Throughout the 1930s he composed the now famous poems about Macavity, Old Deuteronomy, Mr Mistoffelees and many other cats, under the name of 'Old Possum'. In 1981 Eliot's poems were set to music by Andrew Lloyd Webber as Cats which went on to become the longest-running Broadway musical in history. This new edition, published on the 70th anniversary of the book and on the 80th anniversary of Faber and Faber, contains original colour illustrations by the award-winning illustrator of The Gruffalo, Axel Scheffler.

Poems

by T. S. Eliot Peter Washington

Certain of these poems first appeared in Poetry, Blast, Others, The Little Review, and Art and Letters. Contents: Gerontion; Burbank with a Baedeker: Bleistein with a Cigar; Sweeney Erect; A Cooking Egg; Le Directeur; Melange adultere de tout; Lune de Miel; The Hippopotamus; Dans le Restaurant; Whispers of Immortality; Mr. Eliot's Sunday Morning Service; Sweeney Among the Nightingales; The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock; Portrait of a Lady; Preludes; Rhapsody on a Windy Night; Morning at the Window; The Boston Evening Transcript; Aunt Helen; Cousin Nancy; Mr. Apollinax; Hysteria; Conversation Galante; La Figlia Che Pianga.

The Rock

by T. S. Eliot

The choruses in this pageant play represent a new verse experiment on Mr. Eliot's part; and taken together make a sequence of verses about twice the length of "The Waste Land." Mr. Eliot has written the words; the scenario and design of the play were provided by a collaborator, and the purpose was to provide a pageant of the Church of England for presentation on a particular occasion. The action turns upon the efforts and difficulties of a group of London masons in building a church. Incidentally a number of historical scenes, illustrative of church-building, are introduced. The play, enthusiastically greeted, was first presented in England, at Sadler's Wells; the production included much pageantry, mimetic action, and ballet, with music by Dr. Martin Shaw. Immediately after the production of this play in England, Francis Birrell wrote in The New Statesman: "The magnificent verse, the crashing Hebraic choruses which Mr. Eliot has written had best be studied in the book. 'The Rock' is certainly one of the most interesting artistic experiments to be given in recent times." The Times Literary Supplement also spoke with high praise: "The choruses exceed in length any of his previous poetry; and on the stage they prove the most vital part of the performance. They combine the sweep of psalmody with the exact employment of colloquial words. They are lightly written, as though whispered to the paper, yet are forcible to enunciate. . . . There is exhibited here a command of novel and musical dramatic speech which, considered alone, is an exceptional achievement."

The Sacred Wood: Essays on Poetry and Criticism

by T. S. Eliot

This was the first volume of Mr. Eliot's criticism to be published, and it includes essays on Dante, Swinburne, Blake and the contemporaries of Shakespeare ; on poetry, poetic drama and the criticism of poetry. They were the product of his early writing days and are especially interesting as evidence of Mr. Eliot's ideas on literature at that time.

Selected Essays

by T. S. Eliot

An expanded edition of the most significant works of criticism from a Nobel laureate and one of the greatest minds of the modern era.

Selected Poems

by T. S. Eliot

Chosen by Eliot himself, the poems in this volume represent the poet's most important work before Four Quartets. Included here is some of the most celebrated verse in modern literature--"The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock," "Gerontion," "The Waste Land," "The Hollow Men," and "Ash Wednesday"--as well as many other fine selections from Eliot's early work.

The Varieties of Metaphysical Poetry

by T. S. Eliot

While a student at Harvard in the early years of this century, T. S. Eliot immersed himself in the verse of Dante, Donne, and the nineteenth-century French poet Jules Laforgue. His study of the relation of thought and feeling in these poets later led Eliot, as a poet and critic in London, to formulate an original theory of the poetry generally termed "metaphysical"--philosophical and intellectual poetry that revels in startlingly unconventional imagery. Eliot came to perceive a gradual "disintegration of the intellect" following on three "metaphysical moments" of European civilization--the thirteenth, seventeenth, and nineteenth centuries. The theory is at once a provocative prism through which to view Western intellectual and literary history and an exceptional insight into Eliot's own intellectual development. This annotated edition includes the eight Clark Lectures on metaphysical poetry that Eliot delivered at Trinity College in Cambridge in 1926, and their revision and extension for his three Turnball Lectures at The Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore in 1933. They reveal in great depth the historical currents of poetry and philosophy that shaped Eliot's own metaphysical moment in the twentieth century.

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