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Autobiography of Theodore Roosevelt

by Theodore Roosevelt

Theodore Roosevelt was the twenty-sixth President of the United States. A leader of the Republican Party and of the Progressive Party, he was a Governor of New York and a professional historian, naturalist, explorer, hunter, author, and soldier. He was a Progressive reformer who sought to move the dominant Republican Party into the Progressive camp. He distrusted wealthy businessmen and dissolved forty monopolistic corporations as a "trust buster". He was clear, however, to show he did not disagree with trusts and capitalism in principle but was only against corrupt, illegal practices. Roosevelt was a great personality, a great activist, a great preacher of the moralities, a great controversialist, a great showman. He dominated his era.

Bully!

by Theodore Roosevelt

A collection containing 3 autobiographical works by President Theodore Roosevelt, including The Autobiography of Theodore Roosevelt, The Rough Riders, and Throught the Brazilian Wilderness

Forgotten Tales and Vanished Trails

by Theodore Roosevelt Jim Casada

Forgotten Tales and Vanished Trails gathers together Roosevelt's many writings on game hunting and the outdoors from the late 1800s to the early 1900s. Published in various magazines and excerpts from his other publications, this collection finally brings the best musings of a great sportsman into a single volume. These articles span topics from hunting typical game animals (buck, wildebeest, and the like) to the hunting of dangerous predators such as wolves and bears; others are tales told around a campfire, of marauding wolves and man-eating bears, or detailing the finer points of ranching. Some pieces span years, while others detail his shorter exploits across the country.A passionate advocate for the outdoors, Roosevelt's writing is filled with fascinating insights into a world mostly now lost to civilization and commerce. Many of his comments on the precarious balance of the natural world are noted in this volume, and his chapters on conservation and the responsibility of hunters reflect his ever-present interest in preserving the environment for the benefit of generations to come.

Good Hunting

by Theodore Roosevelt

Written in the late nineteenth century and first published in Harper's Round Table magazine in 1896, this collection of articles details turn-of-the-century America's rugged wilderness. Good Hunting is an engaging read for those whose interests lie in hunting sports, and nature. Roosevelt, being the first president to begin many of the national park conservation programs in twentieth-century America, was a lover of the outdoors, and his writings are filled with notations and observations of the lands that he explored. From hunting elks, wolves, and bucks, Roosevelt provides stunning insight into some of northwestern America's most well-known inhabitants.Good Hunting is a fascinating historical portal through which we can view a celebrated sportsman, president, and keen observer of the outdoors. The seven chapters in this book range from classic hunting articles, memorable anecdotes from other outdoorsmen, and even a detailed piece on the specifics of ranching--a topic of much interest at the turn of the century.This is a classic read for anyone wanting to learn more about a man who was so loved by a country, and to escape to the America of yesteryear.

Hunting Trips of a Ranchman and The Wilderness Hunter

by Theodore Roosevelt

Written during his days as a ranchman in the Dakota Bad Lands, these two wilderness tales by Theodore Roosevelt endure today as part of the classic folklore of the West. The narratives provide vivid portraits of the land as well as the people and animals that inhabited it, underscoring Roosevelt's abiding concerns as a naturalist. Originally published in 1885,Hunting Trips of a Ranchmanchronicles Roosevelt's adventures tracking a twelve-hundred-pound grizzly bear in the pine forests of the Bighorn Mou...

The Master of Game

by Theodore Roosevelt Edward Of Norwich William A. Baillie-Grohman F. N. Baillie-Grohman

The Master of Game is the oldest and most important work on the chase in the English language. Based primarily on Gaston de Foix's Livre de chasse, originally composed in 1387, The Master of Game was written by Edward of Norwich at his leisure between 1406 and 1413, mostly while being held prisoner for having treasonous designs against his cousin, Henry IV. While much of the book is almost an exact translation of de Foix, Edward added five chapters of his own to form the major source for our knowledge of the medieval hunt.The book begins with a description of the nature of popular quarry, such as the hare, deer, and badger, including their behavior, characteristics, and even smells, and then moves to a discussion of various hunting dog breeds and how to train them. The medieval chase was a ritual event, so the book continues with an explanation of the various rules and techniques for a successful hunt, including how food was to be distributed among the hunters, the support persons, and the dogs. Weapons and traps of choice are also described, as well as the different horn calls used for communication. The Master of Game is a unique text for naturalists, hunters, and persons interested in social history. Although hunting is nowadays far removed from most people's experience, it was of major interest in the time of Edward of Norwich for ritual, sport, and, of course, food. Some knowledge of the chase was essential for all persons of medieval times.This edition, the first paperback ever of the original version edited in 1909, includes a hearty foreword by Theodore Roosevelt, who adds some important contextual information about the chase and draws on his own vast hunting experience. A delight to read, even for those who are not keen on the sport, The Master of Game has, as one review exclaimed," all Chaucer's freshness, love of the open sky and fragrant woodland."

The Modern Library Essential World History: 4-Book Bundle

by Edward Gibbon Francis Parkman William H. Prescott Theodore Roosevelt

Revisit a world of conquest, exploration, and imperial adventure with this Modern Library eBook bundle that includes Edward Gibbon's The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Francis Parkman's Montcalm and Wolfe, William H. Prescott's History of the Conquest of Mexico, and Theodore Roosevelt's The Naval War of 1812. THE DECLINE AND FALL OF THE ROMAN EMPIRE (ABRIDGED) Edward Gibbon's masterpiece, which narrates the history of the Roman Empire from the second to the fifteenth centuries, is widely considered the greatest work of history ever written. This abridgment retains the full scope of the original, while emphasizing elements ignored in all other abridgments--in particular the role of religion in the empire and the rise of Islam. MONTCALM AND WOLFE The result of more than forty years of passionate research, Montcalm and Wolfe is the epic story of Europe's struggle for dominance of the New World. Thought by many to be Francis Parkman's greatest work, it is a riveting read and an essential part of any military history collection. HISTORY OF THE CONQUEST OF MEXICO William H. Prescott's sweeping account of Cortés's subjugation of the Aztec people has endured as a landmark work of scholarship and dramatic storytelling. This pioneering study presents a compelling view of the clash of civilizations that reverberates in Latin America to this day. THE NAVAL WAR OF 1812 Published when its author, Theodore Roosevelt, was only twenty-three years old, The Naval War of 1812 was immediately hailed as a literary and scholarly triumph, and it is still considered the definitive book on the subject. Roosevelt's inimitable style and robust narrative make The Naval War of 1812 enthralling, illuminating, and utterly essential to every armchair historian.

The Naval War of 1812

by Theodore Roosevelt

Published when Theodore Roosevelt was only twenty-three years old, The Naval War of 1812 was immediately hailed as a literary and scholarly triumph, and it is still considered the definitive book on the subject. It caused considerable controversy for its bold refutation of earlier accounts of the war, but its brilliant analysis and balanced tone left critics floundering, changed the course of U.S. military history by renewing interest in our obsolete forces, and set the young author and political hopeful on a path to greatness. Roosevelt's inimitable style and robust narrative make The Naval War of 1812 enthralling, illuminating, and utterly essential to every armchair historian. The books in the Modern Library War series have been chosen by series editor Caleb Carr according to the significance of their subject matter, their contribution to the fieldof military history, and their literary merit.

The Rough Riders

by Theodore Roosevelt

Along with Colonel Leonard Wood, Theodore Roosevelt instigated the founding of the 1st United States Volunteer Cavalry in 1898 at the beginning of the Spanish-American War. Nicknamed the Rough Riders by journalists, the Cavalry engaged in several battles. This is Roosevelt s best-selling account of one of the most fascinating regiments in American military history.

The Rough Riders

by Theodore Roosevelt

In 1898, as the Spanish-American War was escalating, Theodore Roosevelt assembled an improbable regiment of Ivy Leaguers, cowboys, Native Americans, African-Americans, and Western Territory land speculators. This group of men, which became known as the Rough Riders, trained for four weeks in the Texas desert and then set sail for Cuba. Over the course of the summer, Roosevelt's Rough Riders fought valiantly, and sometimes recklessly, in the Cuban foothills, incurring casualties at a far greater rate than the Spanish. Roosevelt kept a detailed diary from the time he left Washington until his triumphant return from Cuba later that year. The Rough Riders was published to instant acclaim in 1899.Robust in its style and mesmerizing in its account of battle, it is exhilarating, illuminating, and utterly essential reading for every armchair historian and at-home general. The books in the Modern Library War series have been chosen by series editor Caleb Carr according to the significance of their subject matter, their contribution to the field of military history, and their literary merit.

Selected Speeches and Writings of Theodore Roosevelt

by Theodore Roosevelt Gordon Hutner

Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919) was our most published president with an incredible output of writing including forty books, over a thousand articles, and countless speeches and letters. Collected here in one volume are examples of Roosevelt's voluminous writings over a dazzling array of topics. Organized by general categories, readers can sample writings on subjects as varied as the environment, the danger of professional sports; the famous charge of San Juan Hill, and Roosevelt's passion for literary criticism. From addresses and presidential messages on public policy and national ideals, to biography, to travel writing, to ecological concerns, to writings on hunting, to international politics and history, Roosevelt's talents and achievements as a writer went far beyond what we now expect of our public leaders. Roosevelt's legacy as one of the first progressive American politicians, his concerns about environmentalism, his internationalism, and his unflinching belief in the American character and destiny uncannily speak to the issues of our own day and can be found in the pages of this representative and judicious anthology of his work.

The Strenuous Life: Essays and Addresses

by Theodore Roosevelt

Politician, soldier, naturalist, and historian--a century after the peak of his multifaceted career, Theodore Roosevelt remains a towering symbol of American optimism and progress. This collection of speeches and commentaries from 1899 through 1901 embodies the Rough Rider's enduring ideals for attaining a robust political, social, and personal life.The twenty-sixth president of the United States, Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919) served as Chief Executive from 1901 to 1909 and was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1906 for his mediation of the Russo-Japanese War. Roosevelt wrote thirty-five books and delivered numerous lectures on topics ranging from citizenship and success to duty and sportsmanship. His 1899 address to a Chicago audience, "The Strenuous Life," articulates his belief in the transformative powers that individuals can achieve by overcoming hardship. Along with the other speeches and essays in this collection, Roosevelt's work offers an inspiring vision of moral rectitude and stalwart leadership.

Theodore Roosevelt on Bravery

by Theodore Roosevelt

Teddy Roosevelt is the only president in history to deliver a ninety-minute speech directly after being shot in the chest. He's a Nobel Prize recipient, a Harvard graduate, and he was the youngest President in history to be inaugurated into office. Roosevelt's force took America by storm in the early twentieth century, and he is regarded as one of the finest leaders ever to take office. His wisdom even earned him a spot in Mount Rushmore, which has immortalized him along with George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and Abraham Lincoln. As a sickly child, Roosevelt was home-schooled his entire life until enrolling at Harvard University, where he studied biology. A year after graduating, he began his political career as the New York City police commissioner, and later as a member of the New York State Assembly, where he led the reform division of the GOP. In the time since his presidency, Roosevelt's bravery has inspired generations of Americans. "A man who is good enough to shed his blood for the country is good enough to be given a square deal afterwards. " Skyhorse Publishing, as well as our Arcade imprint, are proud to publish a broad range of books for readers interested in history--books about World War II, the Third Reich, Hitler and his henchmen, the JFK assassination, conspiracies, the American Civil War, the American Revolution, gladiators, Vikings, ancient Rome, medieval times, the old West, and much more. While not every title we publish becomes a New York Times bestseller or a national bestseller, we are committed to books on subjects that are sometimes overlooked and to authors whose work might not otherwise find a home.

Through the Brazilian Wilderness

by Theodore Roosevelt

After losing his bid for the United States Presidency as a third party candidate, Theodore Roosevelt decided to take on the most dangerous adventure left on earth. He and his son, Kermit, accepted Candido Mariano da Silva Rondon's invitation to help him plot the course of the River of Doubt. The River of Doubt could just as easily have been named the River of Death. The river's rapids turned out to be much more ferocious than expected, cannibalistic natives dogged the group through most of the journey, and Murphy was their constant companion. The expedition lost men, supplies, and canoes. At one point, Roosevelt contracted a flesh-eating bacteria and became so weak that he urged his son to leave him behind to die. Ultimately Teddy and Kermit emerged from the wilderness triumphantly. Here is their story in Theodore Roosevelt's own words.

Through the Brazilian Wilderness

by Theodore Roosevelt

In 1914, with the well-wishes of the Brazilian government, Theodore Roosevelt, ex-president of the United States; his son, Kermit; and Colonel Rondon travel to South America on a quest to course the River of Doubt. While in Brazil, Theodore is also tasked with a "zoogeographic reconnaissance" of the local wilderness for the archives of the Natural History Museum of New York. In addition to the perils of the incredibly difficult and dangerous terrain, the river was nicknamed "The River of Death" as a testament to its ferocious rapids. Covering a previously undocumented area of South America, this expedition would be a momentous undertaking and fraught with danger.The expedition, officially named Expedicão Scientific Roosevelt-Rondon, was not without incident; men were lost, a cannibalistic tribe tracked the group, and at one point Roosevelt contracted flesh-eating bacteria. In the end though, the Roosevelt-Rondon expedition was a success, and the River of Doubt was renamed the Rio Roosevelt in his honor. Written by a city-born boy who grew up to be a true explorer and leader, Roosevelt's Through the Brazilian Wilderness is a unique and important part of history, and it is indicative of the ex-president's true wanderlust and bravery. Candid black-and-white photos from the expedition fill the pages, adding further dimensions to this remarkable journey.Through the Brazilian Wilderness is an engaging must-read for historians, Roosevelt fans, and modern-day explorers alike.

Up And At ‘Em

by Theodore Roosevelt Lieut.-Col. Harold Evans Hartney

Originally published in 1940, this is a memoir of Lieutenant-Colonel Harold E. Evans, a renowned Canadian-born commander who flew with Britain's Royal Flying Corps (RFC) and the United States Army Air Service (USAS) during World War I. Providing the reader with a fascinating firsthand account of the men and machines that established military aviation as the greatest weapon of all time, this is a must-read for all WWI enthusiasts.

The Winning of the West

by Theodore Roosevelt

Defeated politically and running out of money after a ranch deal gone bad, Theodore Roosevelt began writing his epic history of the conquest of the American West in 1888. He wove a sweeping drama, well documented and filled to the brim with Americans fighting Indian confederacies in the north and south while dealing with the machinations of the British, French, and Spanish and their sympathizers. Roosevelt wanted to show how backwoodsmen such as Daniel Boone and Simon Kenton, followed by hardy pioneer settlers, won the United States the claim to land west of the Alleghenies. Heroism and treachery among both the whites and the Indians can be seen in his rapidly shifting story of a people on the move in pursuit of their manifest destiny. By force and by treaty the new nation was established in the east, and when the explorers and settlers pushed against the Mississippi, everything west of the river was considered part of that nation.This complete set is a must-have for anyone with an interest in the history of the United States. Theodore Roosevelt, one of the greatest minds in American history, was himself a fighting, riding, conquering man who spent much of his life in the wilderness. Truly there is no one else better suited to write about the politics, the fighting, and the bravery of these men than Theodore Roosevelt himself.

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