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Always Coming Home

by Ursula K. Le Guin

A rich and complex interweaving of story and fable, poem, artwork, and music, it totally immerses the reader in the culture of the Kesh, a peaceful people of the far future who inhabit a place called the Valley on the Northern Pacific Coast.

The Beginning Place

by Ursula K. Le Guin

Fleeing from the monotony of his life, Hugh Rogers finds his way to "the beginning place," a gateway to Tembreabrezi, an idyllic, unchanging world of eternal twilight. Irena Pannis was thirteen when she first found the beginning place. Now, seven years later, she has grown to know and love the gentle inhabitants of Tembreabrezi, or Mountaintown, and she sees Hugh as a trespasser. But then a monstrous shadow threatens to destroy Mountaintown, and Hugh and Irena join forces to seek it out. Along the way, they begin to fall in love. Are they on their way to a new beginning or a fateful end? This book has three very brief passages about sex acts.

The Birthday of the World

by Ursula K. Le Guin

For more than four decades, Ursula K. Le Guin has enthralled readers with her imagination, clarity, and moral vision. The recipient of numerous literary prizes, including the National Book Award, the Kafka Award, and five Hugo and five Nebula Awards, this renowned writer has, in each story and novel, created a provocative, ever-evolving universe filled with diverse worlds and rich characters reminiscent of our earthly selves. Now, in The Birthday of the World, this gifted artist returns to these worlds in eight brilliant short works, including a never-before-published novella, each of which probes the essence of humanity.Here are stories that explore complex social interactions and troublesome issues of gender and sex; that define and defy notions of personal relationships and of society itself; that examine loyalty, survival, and introversion; that bring to light the vicissitudes of slavery and the meaning of transformation, religion, and history. The first six tales in this spectacular volume are set in the author's signature world of the Ekumen, "my pseudo-coherent universe with holes in the elbows," as Le Guin describes it -- a world made familiar in her award-winning novel The Left Hand of Darkness. The seventh, title story was hailed by Publishers Weekly as "remarkable . . . a standout." The final offering in the collection, Paradises Lost, is a mesmerizing novella of space exploration and the pursuit of happiness.In her foreword, Ursula K. Le Guin writes, "to create difference-to establish strangeness-then to let the fiery arc of human emotion leap and close the gap: this acrobatics of the imagination fascinates and satisfies me as no other." In The Birthday of the World, this gifted literary acrobat exhibits a dazzling array of skills that will fascinate and satisfy us all.

The Birthday of the World

by Ursula K. Le Guin

For more than four decades, Ursula K. Le Guin has enthralled readers with her imagination, clarity, and moral vision. The recipient of numerous literary prizes, including the National Book Award, the Kafka Award, and five Hugo and five Nebula Awards, this renowned writer has, in each story and novel, created a provocative, ever-evolving universe filled with diverse worlds and rich characters reminiscent of our earthly selves. Now, in The Birthday of the World, this gifted artist returns to these worlds in eight brilliant short works, including a never-before-published novella, each of which probes the essence of humanity.Here are stories that explore complex social interactions and troublesome issues of gender and sex; that define and defy notions of personal relationships and of society itself; that examine loyalty, survival, and introversion; that bring to light the vicissitudes of slavery and the meaning of transformation, religion, and history. The first six tales in this spectacular volume are set in the author's signature world of the Ekumen, "my pseudo-coherent universe with holes in the elbows," as Le Guin describes it -- a world made familiar in her award-winning novel The Left Hand of Darkness. The seventh, title story was hailed by Publishers Weekly as "remarkable . . . a standout." The final offering in the collection, Paradises Lost, is a mesmerizing novella of space exploration and the pursuit of happiness.In her foreword, Ursula K. Le Guin writes, "to create difference-to establish strangeness-then to let the fiery arc of human emotion leap and close the gap: this acrobatics of the imagination fascinates and satisfies me as no other." In The Birthday of the World, this gifted literary acrobat exhibits a dazzling array of skills that will fascinate and satisfy us all.

Brave New Worlds: Dystopian Stories

by Ursula K. Le Guin Kate Wilhelm Orson Scott Card Shirley Jackson Ray Bradbury Neil Gaiman Philip K. Dick Cory Doctorow Carrie Vaughn Kurt Vonnegut Jr. Paolo Bacigalupi

Brave New Worlds collects over 30 of the best tales of dystopian menace by some of today's visionary writers.

Buffalo Gals and Other Animal Presences

by Ursula K. Le Guin

Short fiction about animals, incorporating the relationships between humans and animals in society and folklore.

Catwings (Catwings Series #1)

by Ursula K. Le Guin

Mrs. Jane Tabby could not explain why all four of her children had wings. But it meant that her dreams for her kittens would someday come true. Thelma, Harriet, Roger, and James could fly away from the dangerous city slum and find a safer place to live. The day came. But who could have known what the four kittens would find in the woods?

Catwings Return (Catwings Series #2)

by Ursula K. Le Guin

Wishing to visit their mother, two winged cats leave their new country home to return to the city, where they discover a winged kitten in a building about to be demolished. Book 2 in the Catwings series.

Changing Planes

by Ursula K. Le Guin Eric Beddow

"Then came a child trotting to school with his little backpack. He trotted on all fours, neatly, his hands in leather mitts or boots that protected them from the pavement; he was pale, with small eyes, and a snout, but he was adorable."-- from Changing PlanesThe misery of waiting for a connecting flight at an airport leads to the accidental discovery of alighting on other planes--not airplanes but planes of existence. Ursula Le Guin's deadpan premise frames a series of travel accounts by the tourist-narrator who describes bizarre societies and cultures that sometimes mirror our own, and sometimes open puzzling doors into the alien.Winner of the PEN/Malamud for Short Stories

The Collected Novels of Jose Saramago

by Ursula K. Le Guin Giovanni Pontiero Margaret Jull Costa Jose Saramago

This collection, available exclusively in e-book form, brings together the twelve novels (and one novella) of the great Portuguese writer José Saramago, with an introductory essay by Ursula Le Guin. From Saramago's early work, like the enchanting Baltasar & Blimunda and the controversial Gospel According to Jesus Christ, through his masterpiece Blindness and its sequel Seeing, to his later fables of politics, chance, history, and love, like All the Names and Death with Interruptions, this volume showcases the range and depth of Saramago's career, his inimitable narrative voice, and his vast reserves of invention, humor, and understanding.

Crazy Weather

by Ursula K. Le Guin Charles L. Mcnichols

Ursula K. Le Guin selected Crazy Weather for her contribution to Pharos Editions citing Charles McNichols "offhanded skill, the ease with which (he) takes us deep into a complex society and the complex minds and hearts of its people." In four days of "glory-hunting" with an Indian comrade, South Boy, who is white, realizes he must choose between two cultures. Le Guin explains how she finds Crazy Weather to be "about a soul not at home and not at peace: South Boy, who on the verge of manhood is living in and between two worlds, without a clear way to go in either." Crazy Weather is a unique tale of American identity that serves as "an important document in our cultural history."

The Daughter of Odren

by Ursula K. Le Guin

For fourteen years, Weed, as she is called, the daughter of Lord Garnet, has brought offerings to the standing stone. Alone in a shallow valley, she implores the stone not to forget her. To remember who he is and the life he led. To wait until the day he will be avenged. Now the day has finally arrived. After fourteen long years of waiting, he will have his revenge and she will have her father back. Or will she? Master storyteller Ursula LeGuin takes readers back to Earthsea with this hauntingly beautiful tale of betrayal and revenge.

The Dispossessed

by Ursula K. Le Guin

Centuries ago, the moon Anarres was settled by utopian anarchists who left the Earthlike planet Urras in search of a better world, a new beginning. Now a brilliant physicist, Shevek, determines to reunite the two civilizations that have been separated by hatred since long before he was born. The Dispossessed is a penetrating examination of society and humanity -- and one man's brave undertaking to question the unquestionable and ignite the fires of change.

The Dispossessed: An Ambiguous Utopia, (Hainish #5)

by Ursula K. Le Guin

Centuries ago, the moon Anarres was settled by utopian anarchists who left the Earthlike planet Urras in search of a better world, a new beginning. Now a brilliant physicist, Shevek, determines to reunite the two civilizations that have been separated by hatred since long before he was born. The Dispossessed is a penetrating examination of society and humanity -- and one man's brave undertaking to question the unquestionable and ignite the fires of change.

Edges

by Ursula K. Le Guin

This anthology of stories of the imagination includes The Ballad of Bowsprit Bear's Stead by Damien Broderick, Omens by Carol Emschwilller, Touch the Earth by Scott Sanders, The Other Magus by Avram Davidson, Peek-a-Boom by Sonya Dorman, Suzanne Delage by Gene Wolfe, The Finger by Naomi Mitchison, Barranca, King of the Tree Streets by Lowry Pei, Thomas in Yahvestan by George P. Elliott, The Vengeance of Hera by Thomas M. Disch, Falling by Raylyn Moore, Father Returns from the Mountain by Luis Urrea, The Oracle by M. J. Engh Some of these stories include topics and language considered for adults only by some people.

The Farthest Shore (Earthsea Cycle #3)

by Ursula K. Le Guin

The National Book Award-winning third novel in the renowned Earthsea series from Ursula K. LeGuin.In this third book in the Earthsea series, darkness threatens to overtake Earthsea: The world and its wizards are losing their magic. But Ged Sparrohawk--Archmage, wizard, and dragonlord--is determined to discover the source of this devastating loss.Aided by Enlad's young Prince Arren, Ged embarks on a treacherous journey that will test their strength and will. Because to restore magic, the two warriors must venture to the farthest reaches of their world--and even beyond the realm of death. With millions of copies sold worldwide, Ursula K. Le Guin's Earthsea Cycle has earned a treasured place on the shelves of fantasy lovers everywhere, alongside the works of such beloved authors as J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis.

The First Men in the Moon

by H. G. Wells Ursula K. Le Guin

"Why do people read science fiction? In hopes of receiving such writing as this--a ravishingly accurate vision of things unseen; an utterly unexpected yet necessary beauty." So says Ursula K. Le Guin in her Introduction to The First Men in the Moon, H. G. Wells's 1901 tale of space travel. Heavily criticized upon publication for its fantastic ideas, it is now justly considered a science fiction classic. Cavor, a brilliant scientist who accidentally produces a gravity-defying substance, builds a spaceship and, along with the materialistic Bedford, travels to the moon. The coldly intellectual Cavor seeks knowledge, while Bedford seeks fortune. Instead of insight and gold they encounter the Selenites, a horrifying race of biologically engineered creatures who viciously, and successfully, defend their home. From the Trade Paperback edition.

A Fisherman of the Inland Sea: Stories

by Ursula K. Le Guin

8 short stories from the acclaimed science fiction writer

Gifts

by Ursula K. Le Guin

Scattered among poor, desolate farms, the clans of the Uplands possess gifts. Wondrous gifts: the ability--with a glance, a gesture, a word--to summon animals, bring forth fire, move the land. Fearsome gifts: They can twist a limb, chain a mind, inflict a wasting illness. The Uplanders live in constant fear that one family might unleash its gift against another. Two young people, friends since childhood, decide not to use their gifts. One, a girl, refuses to bring animals to their death in the hunt. The other, a boy, wears a blindfold lest his eyes and his anger kill.In this beautifully crafted story, Ursula K. Le Guin writes of the proud cruelty of power, of how hard it is to grow up, and of how much harder still it is to find, in the world's darkness, gifts of light.Includes a reader's guide and a sample chapter from the companion title Voices.

Gifts (Annals of the Western Shore, Book 1)

by Ursula K. Le Guin

Gifts is a 275 page fantasy novel first published in 2004 and written by the highly distinguished novelist and literary critic Ursula K. Le Guin. It is the first book in a loosely connected series, Annals of the Western Shore, that is written for readers of ages twelve and up. Voices and Powers are the sequels. These novels are set in a fantasy world where slavery, class inequalities, religious fanaticism, cruelty, and violence are problems. The social and political backgrounds have elements calling to mind ancient Scotland, Greece, and Mesopotamia. In each novel, a different first person narrator tells a coming-of-age story in which he or she under stress bravely learns the lessons of power and responsibility. Harcourt's summary of Gifts reads as follows. Scattered among poor, desolate farms, the clans of the Uplands possess gifts. Wondrous gifts: the ability--with a glance, a gesture, a word--to summon animals, bring forth fire, move the land. Fearsome gifts: They can twist a limb, chain a mind, inflict a wasting illness. The Uplanders live in constant fear that one family might unleash its gift against another. Two young people, friends since childhood, decide not to use their gifts. One, a girl, refuses to bring animals to their death in the hunt. The other, a boy, wears a blindfold lest his eyes and his anger kill.#11;#11;In this beautifully crafted story, Ursula K. Le Guin writes of the proud cruelty of power, of how hard it is to grow up, and of how much harder still it is to find, in the world's darkness, gifts of light.

Jane on Her Own (Catwings Series #4)

by Ursula K. Le Guin

Jane is restless. What's the use of having wings and being able to fly if she never gets to go anywhere or see anything? "It's too dangerous," says her big sister Harriet. "If human beings saw cats with wings, they'd put us in cages." But Jane refuses to listen. There are adventures waiting beyond the farm, and she is eager to find them. And find them she does. She flies to the city-and through the window of a man who makes her a TV star! But her pampered life is too much like a cage. Brave Jane escapes, to seek new friends, old friends, and true freedom. Book 4 in the Catwings series.

Kalpa Imperial

by Ursula K. Le Guin Angélica Gorodischer

This is the first of Argentinean writer Angélica Gorodischer's nineteen award-winning books to be translated into English. In eleven chapters, Kalpa Imperial's multiple storytellers relate the story of a fabled nameless empire which has risen and fallen innumerable times. Fairy tales, oral histories and political commentaries are all woven tapestry-style into Kalpa Imperial: beggars become emperors, democracies become dictatorships, and history becomes legends and stories. But this is much more than a simple political allegory or fable. It is also a celebration of the power of storytelling. Gorodischer and translator Ursula K. Le Guin are a well-matched, sly and delightful team of magician-storytellers. Rarely have author and translator been such an effortless pairing. Kalpa Imperial is a powerful introduction to the writing of Angélica Gorodischer, a novel which will enthrall readers already familiar with the worlds of Le Guin.Selected for the New York Times Summer Reading list.* "The dreamy, ancient voice is not unlike Le Guin's, and this collection should appeal to her fans as well as to those of literary fantasy and Latin American fiction."--Library Journal (Starred Review)"There's a very modern undercurrent to the Kalpa empire, with tales focusing on power (in a political sense) rather than generic moral lessons. Her mythology is consistent--wide in scope, yet not overwhelming. The myriad names of places and people can be confusing, almost Tolkeinesque in their linguistic originality. But the stories constantly move and keep the book from becoming overwhelming. Gorodischer has a sizeable body of work to be discovered, with eighteen books yet to reach English readers, and this is an impressive introduction."--Review of Contemporary Fiction"Borges and Cortázar are alive and well."--Bridge Magazine"Those looking for offbeat literary fantasy will welcome Kalpa Imperial: The Greatest Empire That Never Was, by Argentinean writer Angélica Gorodischer. Translated from the Spanish by Ursula Le Guin, this is the first appearance in English of this prize-winning South American fantasist."--Publishers Weekly"It's always difficult to wrap up a rave review without babbling redundant praises. This time I'll simply say "Buy this Book!""--Locus"The elaborate history of an imaginary country...is Nabokovian in its accretion of strange and rich detail, making the story seem at once scientific and dreamlike."--Time Out New YorkKalpa Imperial has been awarded the Prize "Más Allá" (1984), the Prize "Sigfrido Radaelli" (1985) and also the Prize Poblet (1986). It has had four editions in Spanish: Minotauro (Buenos Aires), Alcor (Barcelona), Gigamesh (Barcelona), and Planeta Emecé Editions (Buenos Aires).Praise for the Spanish-language editions of Kalpa Imperial:"Angélica Gorodischer, both from without and within the novel, accomplishes the indispensable function Salman Rushdie says the storyteller must have: not to let the old tales die out; to constantly renew them. And she well knows, as does that one who met the Great Empress, that storytellers are nothing more and nothing less than free men and women. And even though their freedom might be dangerous, they have to get the total attention of their listeners and, therefore, put the proper value on the art of storytelling, an art that usually gets in the way of those who foster a forceful oblivion and prevent the winds of change."--Carmen Perilli, La Gaceta, Tucuman"At a time when books are conceived and published to be read quickly, with divided attention in the din of the subway or the car, this novel is to be tasted with relish, in peace, in moderation, chewing slowly each and every one of the stories that make it up, and digesting it equally slowly so as to properly assimilate it all."--Rodolfo Martinez"A vast, cyclical filigree . . . Gorodischer reaches much farther than the common run of stories about huge empires, maybe because she wasn't interested in them to begin with, and enters the realm of fable, legend, and allegory."--Luis G. Prado, Gigamesh, Barcelona

The Language of the Night: Essays on Fantasy and Science Fiction

by Ursula K. Le Guin

"In these conversational, feisty essays, an energizing mind trip for SF fans, she dissects her own fiction, discusses technique and explores the potential of SF and fantasy, which she considers different branches of the same form of writing."--from "Publisher's Weekly"

The Lathe of Heaven

by Ursula K. Le Guin

In a future world racked by violence and environmental catastrophes, George wakes up one day to discover that his dreams have the ability to alter reality. He seeks help from Dr. William, the psychiatrist who immediately grasps the power George wields.

Lavinia

by Ursula K. Le Guin

In a richly imagined, beautiful new novel, an acclaimed writer gives an epic heroine her voice InThe Aeneid,Vergil's hero fights to claim the king's daughter, Lavinia, with whom he is destined to found an empire. Lavinia herself never speaks a word. Now, Ursula K. Le Guin gives Lavinia a voice in a novel that takes us to the half-wild world of ancient Italy, when Rome was a muddy village near seven hills. Lavinia grows up knowing nothing but peace and freedom, until suitors come. Her mother wants her to marry handsome, ambitious Turnus. But omens and prophecies spoken by the sacred springs say she must marry a foreigner-that she will be the cause of a bitter war-and that her husband will not live long. When a fleet of Trojan ships sails up the Tiber, Lavinia decides to take her destiny into her own hands. And so she tells us what Vergil did not: the story of her life, and of the love of her life. Laviniais a book of passion and war, generous and austerely beautiful, from a writer working at the height of her powers.

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