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Black Reconstruction in America 1860-1880

by W. E. B. Du Bois David Levering Lewis

Provides the history of millions of Africans in America for the twenty years and interprets their fates and experiences in the new world.

Darkwater

by W. E. B. Du Bois

W.E.B. Du Bois, one of the most celebrated intellectuals of the twentieth century, published Darkwater -- a powerful collection of essays, verse and fiction -- in 1920, two decades after his most famous book, The Souls of Black Folk. Throughout his long life and extraordinary career as a scholar, activist, writer and educator, Du Bois's body of work illumined America's understanding of the "problem of the color line." While much of his early texts were sociological investigations of the Black community, the author increasingly incorporated autobiographical, poetic and spiritual elements into his works. The results are some of the most electrifying commentaries ever written on race and class in America. After decades of obscurity, this literary jewel is presented with a new introduction written by David Levering Lewis, author of W.E.B. Du Bois: Biography of a Race, 1868-1919 and W.E.B. Du Bois: The Fight for Equality and the American Century, 1919-1963; Lewis is the foremost scholar of the work of Du Bois. "If The Souls of Black Folk achieved its singular impact through W.E.B. Du Bois's masterly interweaving of the personal and the universal in such a way that each appropriated something of the illustrative and symbolic value of the other, much of Darkwater: Voices from Within the Veil was a cri de coeur in which the author's anger at the absurdities of racial prejudice crackled through the text like electric jolts that scorched, illumined, or stunned." -- David Levering Lewis, from the Introduction

Darkwater: Voices from within the Veil

by W. E. B. Du Bois

First published in 1920, this collection of essays, fiction, and poetry by Du Bois addresses questions of race, class, and gender. In his introduction Feagin (sociology, U. of Florida) notes that the collection was unrivaled in its time both for its insights and for its experimental presentation. The collection begins with an autobiographical essay, before moving to such matters as the impoverishment of Africa at the hands of European colonialism; the necessity of abandoning elite ownership of the means of production in order to achieve full emancipation; the importance of expanding women's economic, political, and procreation rights; and his usual trenchant observations on American racism and the institutional legacy of slavery.

The Gift of Black Folk: The Negroes in the Making of America

by W. E. B. Du Bois

Although the Civil War marked an end to slavery in the United States, it would take another fifty years to establish the country's civil rights movement. Dr. W.E.B. Du Bois was among the first generation of African-American scholars to spearhead this movement towards equality. As cofounder of the NAACP, he sought to initiate equality through social change, and as a talented writer, he created books and essays that provide a revealing glimpse into the black experience of the times. In The Gift of Black Folk--one of Du Bois' most important works--he recounts the remarkable history of African-Americans and their many unsung contributions to American society.

John Brown

by W. E. B. Du Bois

Contains the original (1909) edition of the text and six related documents. The life of one of America's most well-known and controversial abolitionists is examined by one of its most brilliant black intellectuals and activists. Du Bois (1868-1963) defended Brown from accusations as a demagogue and radical, suggesting that his greatest crime was that he demanded freedom for the oppressed.

John Brown

by W. E. B. Du Bois David R. Roediger

A moving cultural biography of abolitionist martyr John Brown, by one of the most important African-American intellectuals of the twentieth century. In the history of slavery and its legacy, John Brown looms large as a hero whose deeds partly precipitated the Civil War. As Frederick Douglass wrote: "When John Brown stretched forth his arm ... the clash of arms was at hand." DuBois's biography brings Brown stirringly to life and is a neglected classic.

The Negro

by W. E. B. Du Bois

The Negro, written by one of the great minds of the modern era, was the first overall examination of the history of African and African-derived people, from their early cultures through the period of the slave trade and into the twentieth century.

The Philadelphia Negro

by Elijah Anderson W. E. B. Du Bois

In 1897 the promising young sociologist William Edward Burghardt Du Bois (1868-1963) was given a temporary post as Assistant in Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania in order to conduct in-depth studies of the Negro community in Philadelphia. The product of those studies was the first great empirical book on the Negro in American society.More than one hundred years after its original publication by the University of Pennsylvania Press, The Philadelphia Negro remains a classic work. It is the first, and perhaps still the finest, example of engaged sociological scholarship--the kind of work that, in contemplating social reality, helps to change it.In his introduction, Elijah Anderson examines how the neighborhood studied by Du Bois has changed over the years and compares the status of blacks today with their status when the book was initially published.

The Quest of the Silver Fleece

by W. E. B. Du Bois

Set in Alabama and Washington, D.C., in the early part of the twentieth century, W. E. B. Du Bois's first novel weaves the themes of racial equality and understanding through the stark reality of prejudice and bias. Du Bois addresses the fact that, despite the legal emancipation of African Americans, the instruments of oppression, in both the economy and government, remained in good working order. At the time he was writing, powerful white industrialists controlled the cotton industry, the "silver fleece" that depended, as it did during slavery, on the physical labor of African Americans.

The Quest of the Silver Fleece

by W. E. B. Du Bois

Set in Alabama and Washington, D. C. , in the early part of the twentieth century, W. E. B. Du Bois's first novel weaves the themes of racial equality and understanding through the stark reality of prejudice and bias. Originally published in 1911 and conceived immediately after The Souls of Black Folk, Du Bois turned to fiction to carry his message to a popular audience who were unfamiliar with his nonfiction works. Du Bois addresses the fact that, despite the legal emancipation of African Americans, the instruments of oppression, in both the economy and government, remained in good working order. At the time he was writing, powerful white industrialists controlled the cotton industry, the "silver fleece" that depended, as it did during slavery, on the physical labor of African Americans. White Americans also controlled local and national government. In the novel, Blessed "Bles" Alwyn, a young man seeking formal education to improve himself, is captivated by Zora, a vivacious, independent woman who lives outside society in a mysterious swamp. Faced with shocking events in Zora's past and ambivalence about how a black man should integrate into American society, Bles pursues his goals and ends up in Washington to assist on a senator's campaign. While in the city, he meets successful African Americans--and falls in love--but he ultimately recoils from the hypocrisies they must endure in order to be accepted in society. Instead, he is compelled to return to Alabama and Zora, where he must face his greatest challenges and fears. With its frank and clear language, The Quest of the Silver Fleece is a remarkable portrait of racial prejudice at the turn of the twentieth century. Through the characters, Du Bois demonstrates the efficacy of self-sufficiency for those who face discrimination while championing the benefits of strength in diversity to American society as a whole.

The Souls of Black Folk

by W. E. B. Du Bois

"The problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line." Thus speaks W.E.B. Du Bois in The Souls Of Black Folk, one of the most prophetic and influential works in American literature. In this eloquent collection of essays, first published in 1903, Du Bois dares as no one has before to describe the magnitude of American racism and demand an end to it. He draws on his own life for illustration, from his early experiences teaching in the hills of Tennessee to the death of his infant son and his historic break with the conciliatory position of Booker T. Washington. Far ahead of its time, The Souls Of Black Folk both anticipated and inspired much of the black consciousness and activism of the 1960's and is a classic in the literature of civil rights. The elegance of DuBois's prose and the passion of his message are as crucial today as they were upon the book's first publication.

The Souls of Black Folk

by W. E. B. Du Bois Henry Louis Gates Jr.

Originally published in 1903, The Souls of Black Folk is a classic study of race, culture, and education at the turn of the twentieth century. With its singular combination of essays, memoir, and fiction, this book vaulted Du Bois to the forefront of American political commentary and civil rights activism. It is an impassioned, at times searing account of the situation of African Americans in the United States, making a forceful case for the access of African Americans to higher education and extolling...

The Suppression of the African Slave-Trade to the United States of America, 1638-1870

by W. E. B. Du Bois

W. E. B. Du Bois (1868-1963) was a champion of civil rights and the political and cultural voice of black Americans of his day. This is his doctoral dissertation for Harvard, examining slavery in Colonial America, its consideration by the Constitutional Convention, the plantation economy of the South and its influence on the slave trade, and the role of Northern merchants in financing the slave trade. This 1896 classic remains a model of historical research and writing. This is an unabridged republication of the edition first published by Harvard University Press, Cambridge, 1896. It includes a new, brief introduction. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

W. E. B. Du Bois Speaks: Speeches and Addresses, 1920-1963 (Vol. 2)

by W. E. B. Du Bois Kwame Nkrumah Philip S. Foner

Pioneer for the struggle for Afro-American liberation and for African liberation, prolific Black scholar, W.E.B. Du Bois is one of the giants of the twentieth century. Yet until very recently his contributions have been largely ignored. Today a growing number of Black and white scholars and students are reading and re-reading many of Du Bois's works and increasingly appreciating his contributions towards advancing the modern civil rights movement and the achievement of African independence. This volume the second of a two-volume collection is devoted to his speeches from 1920 to his death in 1963. The first volume covers the period of his earliest speeches in the 1890s to the close of the First World War. Nearly all of the speeches in these two volumes have never before been published in book form. W.E.B. Du Bois Speaks covers the full range of issues involving Black Americans from the era of slavery to the contemporary period. In these speeches, Du Bois set forth clearly and in his usual magnificent prose the various strategies in the Black liberation struggle. But as a profound believer in socialism and internationalism, he also made it clear that this struggle was linked with the interests of all who lived in the United States, regardless of color. An anti-imperialist from his youth, Du Bois repeatedly emphasizes in his speeches the need for all Americans to unite in the struggle against colonialism and for peace. Each speech is preceded by a brief description of the circumstances under which it was delivered and there are explanatory notes by the editor throughout the volume.

The World and Africa

by W. E. B. Du Bois

A inquiry into the important role that Africa and African people have played in world history.

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