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The Little Data Book 2011

by World Bank

This pocket-sized reference on key development data for over 200 countries provides profiles of each country with 54 development indicators about people, environment, economy, technology and infrastructure, trade, and finance.

The Little Data Book on Africa 2010

by World Bank

'The Little Data Book on Africa 2010' is a pocket edition of 'Africa Development Indicators 2010'. It contains some 115 key indicators on economics, human development, governance, and partnership and is intended as a quick reference for users of the 'Africa Development Indicators 2010' book and African Development Indicators Online. The country tables present the latest available data for World Bank member countries in Africa.

The Little Data Book on Africa 2012/2013

by World Bank

The Little Data Book on Africa 2012/2013 is a pocket edition of Africa Development Indicators 2012/2013. It contains some 115 key indicators on economics, human development, governance, and partnership and is intended as a quick reference for users of the Africa Development Indicators 2010 book and African Development Indicators Online. The country tables present the latest available data for World Bank member countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, covering about 1,700 indicators from 1961 to 2011. Key themes are : - Basic indicators- Drivers of growth- Participating in growth- Capable states- PartnershipsDesigned to provide all those interested in Africa with quick reference and a reliable set of data to monitor development programs and aid flows in the region, this is an invaluable pocket edition reference tool for analysts and policy makers who want a better understanding of the economic and social developments occurring in Africa. For free access to Africa Development Indicators online, please visit http://data. worldbank. org/data-catalog.

The Little Data Book on External Debt 2010

by World Bank

'The Little Data Book on External Debt' provides a quick reference for users interested in external debt stocks and flows, major economic aggregates, key debt ratios, and the currency composition of long-term debt for all countries reporting through the Debtor Reporting system. A pocket edition of 'Global Development Finance 2010, Summary and Country Tables', it contains statistical tables for 135 countries as well as summary tables for regional and income groups.

The Little Data Book on Financial Inclusion 2012

by World Bank

The Little Data Book on Financial Inclusion 2012 is a pocket edition of the Global Financial Inclusion Index ("Global Findex") database providing country-level indicators on the use of formal bank accounts, payments behavior, savings patterns, credit patterns, and insurance decisions. It provides data on financial inclusion by key demographic characteristics--gender, age, education, income, and rural or urban residence. The book includes summary pages for 147 economies and regional and income group averages.

The Little Data Book on Gender in Africa 2012/13

by World Bank

The Little Data Book on Gender in Africa 2012/13 provides a summary collection of gender statistics on Africa available in one volume. It contains 60 indicators, covering 53 African countries. Additional data may be found on the companion CD-ROM or online, covering about 1,700 indicators from 1961 to 2011. Key themes are : - Basic demographic indicators- Education- Health- Labor force and wages- Women's empowermentDesigned to provide all those interested in Africa with quick reference and a reliable set of data to monitor development programs and aid flows in the region, this is an invaluable pocket edition reference tool for analysts and policy makers who want a better understanding of the economic and social developments occurring in Africa. For free access to Africa Development Indicators online, please visit http://data. worldbank. org/data-catalog.

The Little Data Book on Information and Communication Technology 2010

by World Bank

This Little Data Book presents at-a-glance tables for over 140 economies showing the most recent national data on key indicators of information and communications technology (ICT), including access, quality, affordability, efficiency,sustainability, and applications.

The Little Data Book on Private Sector Development 2010

by World Bank

'The Little Data Book on Private Sector Development 2010' is one of a series of pocket-sized books intended to provide a quick reference to development data on different topics. It provides data for more than 20 key indicators on business environment and private sector development in a single page for each of the World Bank member countries and other economies with populations of more than 30,000. These more than 200 country pages are supplemented by aggregate data for regional and income groupings.

The Little Green Data Book 2010

by World Bank

This pocket-sized reference on key environmental data for over 200 countries includes key indicators on agriculture, forestry, biodiversity, energy, emission and pollution, and water and sanitation. The volume helps establish a sound base of information to help set priorities and measure progress toward environmental sustainability goals.

Mongolia Economic Retrospective 2008-2010

by World Bank

Mongolia was one of the East Asian economies hardest hit by the global downturn, as copper prices collapsed and external demand fell. This Economic Retrospective highlights the key economic, financial and policy developments in the country during the crisis and recovery over 2008 to 2010. In particular, it offers a closer look at the weaknesses in the economic structure and policy environment that lay at the heart of downturn, and which amplified the external shock due to the collapse in global commodity prices from mid-2008. The Retrospective offers valuable insights into how an inappropriate policy mix can culminate in macroeconomic instability. In Mongolia's case, a combination of expansive fiscal and monetary policy during the boom years, a de facto peg to the US dollar, and an overheating financial sector triggered a loss of confidence in the banking sector, large reserve losses and deposit flight, and caused a large fiscal and balance of payments shock that necessitated assistance by the IMF and other donors. Although the economy has rebounded since the end of 2009 and the successful negotiation of the Oyu Tolgoi (OT) mining project has helped transform the medium to long-term outlook, there remain sizeable policy challenges. In particular, the looming mining boom brings the risks of "Dutch disease" effects and a return to the profligate populism of the past. In the near term significant fiscal financing risks remain until revenues from OT are realized. In particular, this Retrospective discusses the need for continued fiscal consolidation and how the adoption of the planned fiscal stability law should help manage the upcoming mining boom. Meanwhile, ongoing solvency problems in the banking sector need to be resolved quickly and transparently to prepare the sector for the upturn in economic activity.

Natural Hazards, UnNatural Disasters: Effective Prevention Through the Economic Lens

by World Bank

Earthquakes, droughts, floods, and storms are natural hazards, but unnatural disasters are the deaths and damages that result from human acts of omission and commission. Every disaster is unique, but each exposes actions-by individuals and governments at different levels--that, had they been different, would have resulted in fewer deaths and less damage. Prevention is possible, and this book examines what it takes to do this cost-effectively. It looks at disasters primarily through an economic lens. Economists emphasize self-interest to explain how people choose the amount of prevention, insurance, and coping. But lenses can distort as well as sharpen images, so the book also draws from other disciplines: psychology to examine how people may misperceive risks, political science to understand voting patterns, and nutrition science to see how stunting in children after a disaster impairs cognitive abilities and productivity as adults much later. Peering into the future, it shows that while urbanization and climate change will increase exposure to hazards, vulnerability can be reduced if cities are better managed. This book will be of interest to government officials, urban planners, relief agencies, NGOs, donors, and other development practitioners.

Peru: Country Program Evaluation for the World Bank Group, 2003-2009

by World Bank

This Peru Country Program Evaluation for the World Bank Group, 2003-2009 is part of IEG's country program evaluation series. To date, IEG's in-depth country evaluations have comprised IEG-WB Country Assistance Evaluations (CAEs) and IEG-IFC Country Impact Reviews (CIRs). Both the CAEs and CIRs have involved comprehensive evaluations of the respective institutions' activities in a country. In a pilot approach, this evaluation was prepared by a single IEG team that looked at development interventions across the three WBG institutions. The evaluation draws on WBG documents, external literature, and on interviews with government officials, representatives of the private sector and civil society, nongovernmental organizations, bilateral and multilateral development partners, and Bank, IFC, and MIGA staff in Washington and in Peru. An IEG mission visited Peru in September 2009. IEG also cooperated with the Evaluation Office of the Global Environment Facility that was conducting a parallel evaluation in Peru.

Poor Places, Thriving People: How the Middle East and North Africa Can Rise Above Spatial Disparities

by World Bank

Geographical differences in living standards are a pressing concern for policymakers in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). Economies of agglomeration mean that production is most efficient when concentrated in leading areas. So how can the region reduce spatial disparities in well-being without compromising growth? The solution to spatial disparities lies in matching the policy package to a lagging area's specific characteristics. Key questions include: is the lagging area problem really as serious as one thinks; is it a problem of low economic opportunity or of poor human development; are lagging area populations close enough to agglomerations to benefit from spillovers; and is there manifest private investor interest? Drawing on the World Bank's 2009 World Development Report, Reshaping Economic Geography, the book proposes 3 policy packages. First, all lagging areas can benefit from a "level playing-field for development" and investment in people. Geographic disparities in the policy environment are a legacy of MENA's history, and gaps in human development are a major component of spatial disparities. Smart policies for the investment environment, health, education, social transfers and urban development can therefore close spatial gaps in living standards. Second, lagging areas that are close to economic agglomeration can benefit from spillovers - provided that they are connected. MENA's expenditure priority is not necessarily long-distance primary connections, but infrastructure maintenance and short-distance connections such as rural roads and peri-urban networks. Public-private partnerships can also bring electronic connectivity to lagging areas. Third, shifting regional development policy away from spatial subsidies towards the facilitation of cluster-based growth will increase the chance of cost-effective impacts. The final chapter of the book examines the institutional prerequisites for effective spatial policy. It argues that MENA's centralized/sectoral structures are not always adapted to governments' spatial development agendas, and describes alternative institutional options.

Poverty and the Environment: Understanding Linkages at the Household Level

by World Bank

Drawing upon recent analytical work prepared inside and outside the World Bank, this report identifies key lessons concerning the linkages between poverty and the environment. With a focus on the contribution of environmental resources to household welfare, the analysis increases our understanding of how specific reforms and interventions can have an impact on the health and livelihoods of poor people. 'Scholars and development practitioners increasingly recognize that in low-income countries there are inextricable links between poverty reduction and natural resources management. Demand has grown immensely for not only more, but better empirical evidence on those links. This volume offers a careful synthesis of key findings from growing literature on the environmental determinants of household welfare, as reflected by indicators of consumption, health, and income. The primary contribution of this study is that is has drawn out vital policy conclusions that will be of value to organizations and governments concerned about poverty and the environment in the developing world.' --Professor Christopher B. Barrett, Cornell University

Poverty Reduction Support Credits: An Evaluation of World Bank Support

by World Bank

This evaluation examines the relevance and effectiveness of Poverty Reduction Support Credits (PRSCs), introduced by the Bank in early 2001 to support comprehensive growth, improve social conditions, and reduce poverty in IDA countries. PRSCs were intended to allow greater country-ownership, provide more predictable annual support, exhibit more flexible conditionality, and strengthen budget processes in a results-based framework. By September 2009, the Bank had approved 99 PRSCs totaling some $7.5 billion and representing 38% percent of IDA policy based lending. The evaluation finds that in terms of process, PRSCs were effective in easing conditionality, increasing country ownership and aid predictability, stimulating dialogue between central and sectoral ministries, and improving donor harmonization. In terms of content, PRSCs succeeded in emphasizing public sector management and pro-poor service delivery. Yet in terms of results, it is difficult to distinguish growth and poverty outcomes in countries with PRSCs from other better performing IDA countries. There is scope for further simplifying the language of conditionality and underpinning PRSCs with better pro-poor growth diagnostics. PRSCs can also strengthen their results frameworks and limit sector policy content in multi-sector DPLs to high-level or cross-cutting issues. Today, Bank policy has subsumed PRSCs under the broader mantle of Development Policy Lending and the rationale for a separate 'brand name' although differences linger from the past. Since PRSCs and other policy-based lending have gradually converged in design, remaining differences compared to other Development Policy Loans should be clearly spelled out, or the separate PRSC brand name should be phased out.

Strategic Environmental Assessment in Policy and Sector Reform

by The University of Gothenburg The Netherlands Commission for Environmental Assessment Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences World Bank

This book presents the findings and recommendations of the evaluation of the World Bank's Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) Pilot Program. It shows that SEA can contribute to improving development policy and sector reform by calling attention to environmental and social priorities, strengthening constituencies, enhancing policy capacities, and improving social accountability. It also provides guidance for undertaking SEA in policy and sector reform. Although it acknowledges the need for tailoring SEA to the context of specific sectors and countries, the book discusses in detail-and illustrates with examples-the analytical work and participatory processes required for effective SEA at the policy level. It suggests that the time is ripe for scaling up SEA in development policy and sector reform and recommends the establishment of a global alliance on environmental and climate change mainstreaming to support developing countries' efforts for achieving sustainable development. The book concludes by arguing that SEA applied to sector reform and development policy is a critical step for these efforts to be successful. This title responds to demand for SEA approaches at the policy level from policymakers, development and environmental specialists of bilateral and multilateral institutions, and environmental assessment specialists. This publication is the result of joint work by the Environment Department of the World Bank, the Environmental Economics Unit at the Department of Economics of the University of Gothenburg (EEU), the Swedish EIA Centre at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, and the Netherlands Commission for Environmental Assessment (NCEA.) In line with the Paris Declaration on Aid Effectiveness, the book also contributes to harmonization of SEA approaches by the donor community that is led by the SEA Task Team of the OECD Development Assistance Committee.

Strengthening the Education Sector Response to HIV and AIDS in the Caribbean

by World Bank

The Caribbean Region is second only to Africa in the impact of HIV and AIDS. The Caribbean Community (CARICOM) has responded to this challenge by promoting a multisectoral response to the epidemic. UNESCO has provided regional leadership in strengthening the education sector component of this response. In 2005, UNESCO launched, with CARICOM and the World Bank, a regioinal dialogue involving representatives of Ministries of Education, national HIV and AIDS coordinating councils, development partners, and regional institutions providing leadership in the HIV response, which led to the development and endorsement of a regional Proposal for Action: Accelerating the Education Sector Response to HIV and AIDS in the Caribbean Region. In June 2006, Ministers of Education and representatives of National AIDS AUthorities met in Port-of-Spain, Trinidad and Tobago, under the auspices of the CARICOM Council on Human and Social Development, and agreed to promote education sector leadership in addressing HIV and AIDS and to create a supportive policy and financial environment at national and regional levels. This report describes the development of these regional processes and how they have led to a stronger education sector response at the regional level. It also focuses on developments in three countries (Guyana, Jamaica, and St. Lucia) as examples of how this regional effort translates into action at the national level.

Sustainable Land Management: Challenges, Opportunities, and Trade-offs

by World Bank

Land is the integrating component of all livelihoods depending on farm, forest, rangeland, or water (rivers, lakes, coastal marine) habitats. Due to varying political, social, and economic factors, the heavy use of natural resources to supply a rapidly growing global population and economy has resulted in the unintended mismanagement and degradation of land and ecosystems. 'Sustainable Land Management' provides strategic focus to the implementation of sustainable land management (SLM) components of the World Bank's development strategies. SLM is a knowledge-based procedure that integrates land, water, biodiversity, and environmental management to meet rising food and fiber demands while sustaining livelihoods and the environment. This book, aimed at policy makers, project managers, and development organization, articulates priorities for investment in SLM and natural resource management and identifies the policy, institutional, and incentive reform options that will accelerate the adoption of SLM productivity improvements and pro-poor growth.

Sustainable Land Management Sourcebook

by World Bank

Policies promoting pro-poor agricultural growth are the key to helping countries achieve the Millennium Development Goals-especially the goal of halving poverty and hunger by 2015. The public sector, private sector, and civil society organizations are working to enhance productivity and competitiveness of the agricultural sector to reduce rural poverty and sustain the natural resource base. The pathways involve participation by rural communities, science and technology, knowledge generation and further learning, capacity enhancement, and institution building. Sustainable land management (SLM)-an essential component of such policies-will help to ensure the productivity of agriculture, forestry, fisheries, and hydrology. SLM will also support a range of ecosystem services on which agriculture depends. The 'Sustainable Land Management Sourcebook' provides a knowledge repository of tested practices and innovative resource management approaches that are currently being tested. The diverse menu of options represents the current state of the art of good land management practices. Section one identifies the need and scope for SLM and food production in relation to cross-sector issues such as freshwater and forest resources, regional climate and air quality, and interactions with biodiversity conservation and increasingly valuable ecosystem services. Section two categorizes the diversity of land management systems globally and the strategies for improving household livelihoods in each system type. Section three presents a range of investment notes that summarize good practice, as well as innovative activity profiles that highlight design of successful or innovative investments. Section four identifies easy-to-access, Web-based resources relevant for land and natural resource managers. The 'Sourcebook' is a living document that will be periodically updated and expanded as new material and findings become available on good land management practices. This book will be of interest to project managers and practitioners working to enhance land and natural resource management in developing countries.

Sustaining Forests: A Development Strategy

by World Bank

The World Bank's Forests Strategy, adopted in October 2002, charts a path for the Bank's proactive engagement in the sector to help attain the goal of poverty reduction without jeopardizing the environmental values intrinsic to sustainability. This strategy replaces the Bank's 1991 Forestry Strategy, and was developed on the basis of the findings of an independent review of the 1991 strategy and a two-year consultative process with development partners and stakeholders around the world. The revised strategy, Sustaining Forests, is built on three guiding pillars: harnessing the potential of forests to reduce poverty, integrating forests into sustainable economic development, and protecting global forest values. Recognizing the key role forests play in contributing to the livelihoods of people living in extreme poverty, government and local ownership of forest policies and interventions are emphasized along with the development of appropriate institutions to ensure good governance and the mainstreaming of forests into national development planning. The strategy also aims to support ecologically, socially and economically sound management of production forests by ensuring good management practices through application of safeguard procedures and independent monitoring and certification. Implementation of the strategy will center on building and strengthening partnerships with the private sector, non-governmental organizations, and other donor agencies to promote better forest conservation and management at country and global levels.

Textbooks and School Library Provision in Secondary Education in Sub-Saharan Africa

by World Bank

This study is based on research on secondary textbook and school library provision in Botswana, Cameroon, Cote d'Ivoire, Ghana, Kenya, Malawi, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Togo, as well as existing recent country reports on textbook provision and an extensive desk research. Considerable variations exist in Sub-Saharan African textbook requirements needed to meet secondary curriculum specifications just as significant differences exist between and within countries in regard to the average price of recommended textbooks. Some countries have no approved textbooks list. This World Bank Working Paper aims to discuss the textbook situation in Sub-Saharan Africa with a special focus on secondary textbook availability, cost and financing, distribution and publishing, and the status of school libraries. Its objective is to analyze the issues in secondary textbook and school library provision and to provide some options and strategies for improvement.

Transitions in Secondary Education in Sub-Saharan Africa

by World Bank

This World Bank Working Paper discusses equity and efficiency issues in secondary education transitions in Sub-Saharan Africa. Its main purpose is to identify and analyze national, regional, and local measures that may lead to the development of more efficient and seamless transitions between post-primary education pathways. In most African countries student transition from primary to junior secondary is still accompanied by significant repetition and dropout. Transitions within the secondary cycle also cause significant losses and should use more effective assessment and selection methodologies. According to global trends, Africa needs to revisit its post-primary structures to provide more diversified (academic and non-academic) pathways of learning which respond better to the continent's present economic and social realities. In the end, the main goal should be to produce young people who can become productive citizens and lead healthy lives, as demonstrated by middle and higher-income economies.

Using Training to Build Capacity: An Evaluation of the World Bank's Project-based and WBI Training

by World Bank

The World Bank finances about US$720 million in training every year, through both its lending projects and its in-house World Bank Institute (WBI). The evaluation found that while most of the training reviewed resulted in demonstrable participant learning, this learning frequently did not lead to real change in participants' workplace performance. Poor training outcomes most often resulted from training content that wasn't relevant to the needs and goals of the target institutions, or from the trainees' lack of incentives or resources to apply learning in their workplaces. These findings highlight how important it is for training to be embedded in broader capacity-building programs that identify and address organizational and institutional capacity constraints alongside human ones.

World Bank East Asia and Pacific Economic Update 2010

by World Bank

The World Bank East Asia and Pacific Economic Update 2010, Volume 2, is the latest edition of the comprehensive, twice-yearly review of the region's economies prepared by the East Asia and Pacific region of the World Bank. Entitled 'Robust Recovery, Rising Risks,' this Update notes that output and trade flows have recovered to above pre-crisis levels throughout developing East Asia. Confidence is on the rise, and private sector investment is once again driving growth. Yet greater confidence in the region's growth prospects and concerns about tepid economic expansion in advanced economies are confronting policy makers with a delicate balancing act. In particular, the return of large capital inflows to East Asia has caused currencies to appreciate substantially, and is leading to concerns about asset price bubbles. Countries need to address emerging risks at the same time as medium-term challenges to sustain strong growth. The need for China to rebalance the economy by altering the pattern of growth and investment is increasingly critical for sustainability. Commodity exporters in the region need to ensure a transparent framework to use resource-related revenues for development. The middle-income countries of the region, excluding China, need to raise investment in physical and human capital and encourage innovation if they are to eventually attain high-income status. Presenting unique perspectives along with the latest data on the region, the World Bank East Asia and Pacific Economic Update is a valued resource for policymakers, researchers, businesspersons, students, and anyone else with a serious interest in this dynamic region.

World Bank Engagement at the State Level: The Cases of Brazil, India, Nigeria, and Russia

by World Bank

This report is a pilot cross-country study that summarizes 10 years (1998-2008) of the World Bank's engagement at the state level in selected large federal countries and combines elements of a country assistance evaluation and a thematic review. It looks at several strategic and operational questions posed by state-level engagement, among them the selection of states, the scope, and the modalities of engagement. According to the report, two tendencies-often in tension-featured in most approaches for selection of states for direct engagement. One was to support better-performing, reformist states, while the other was to support the poorest states as a more direct route to reducing poverty. Overall, the study confirms the desirability of continued selective lending in a few focus states. Among other findings: the Bank's engagement with progressive reformist states has added value and has been highly appreciated, but in order to enhance the poverty impact of state level interventions, greater weight should be given to the needs of poorest states by balancing states' propensity to reform and the concentration of poverty within them; continued focus on public finance management appears sound, irrespective of whether engagement is confined to this area or serves as an entry point for broader engagement; there is considerable scope for greater impact from knowledge transfer between states and countries and expanded knowledge services to the state-level clients.

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