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Folk Legends of Japan

by Richard M. Dorson Yoshie Noguchi

The true folk legend, as distinguished from the fairy tale or literary embellishment, is one of the sure keys to a people's beliefs, customs, and ways of thinking. Japan possesses more such legends than any Occidental country. And yet this great body of legendry, with its wealth of meaning, its significance and itssheer fascination, has until now been only rarely available in English translations usually in out-of-the-way publications. The present volume presents a representative collection of over one hundred Japanese folk legends. These have been selected by a distinguished American folklorist, drawn from expert Japanese transcriptions of orally told legends, and carefully translated in such a way as to bring out the charming, unadorned, and sometimes disarmingly frank folk quality of the originals. Each legend is carefully annotated for the student, scholar, and a full bibliography is provided.

Folk Songs of Japanese Children

by Yoshie Noguchi Donald Paul Berger

Simple, singable, and engaging, the traditional songs of Japanese children combine the unique charm of Japan with the universal appeal of children's music everywhere. Some of the fifteen songs in this collection are current throughout Japan. Others are little known outside a small area. All have deep roots in history and tradition. Several are game songs that will be enjoyed by all children who have played "London Bridge is Falling Down" or "The Farmer in the Dell." Mr. Berger's commentary on each song illuminates many facets of Japanese culture; and his arrangements, with easy piano accompaniments, make the songs suitable for unison or two-part singing by children or adults. The complete Japanese text, in both Japanese characters and Roman alphabet, is included for each song, together with a singable English version and a literal translation.

Folk Songs of Japanese Children

by Yoshie Noguchi Donald Paul Berger

This is a delightful collection of Japanese children's songs with lyrics, sheet music and cultural notes.Simple, singable, and engaging, the traditional songs of Japanese children combine the unique charm of Japan with the universal appeal of children's music everywhere. Some of the fifteen songs in this collection are current throughout Japan. Others are little known outside a small area. All have deep roots in history and tradition. Several are game songs that will be enjoyed by all children who have played "London Bridge is Falling Down" or "The Farmer in the Dell."Mr. Berger's commentary on each song illuminates many facets of Japanese culture; and his arrangements, with easy piano accompaniments, make the songs suitable for unison or two-part singing by children or adults. The complete Japanese text, in both Japanese characters and Roman alphabet, is included for each song, together with a singable English version and a literal translation.

Kobo and the Wishing Pictures

by Yoshie Noguchi Dorothy W. Baruch

Kobo is a small Japanese boy whose father paints ema, or wishing pictures, for so many customers that he finds no time to paint a single one for his own family-not even for Kobo, who wants one so badly to take to the shrine on Wishing Day. As the customers come and go, Kobo has a chance to observe many types of people and to consider many different kinds of wishes, none of which seems quite right for him. It is all very discouraging until, at last, he begins to get an idea, and then . . . But that is the secret of the story.In meeting Kobo and the many other interesting people in this book, the young reader is introduced to a number of the charming manners and customs of rural Japan, as well as to a number of situations that parallel those experienced by children almost everywhere. As the author expresses it in her introduction: "In this book there are many pictures of ema. We hope that the wishes shown with them, along with the story of Kobo and his family, will bridge customs and culture through our children's seeing that the children of Japan have the same human feeling of affection, of rivalry, of sadness and joy."

Kobo and the Wishing Pictures

by Yoshie Noguchi Dorothy W. Baruch

Kobo is a small Japanese boy whose father paints ema, or wishing pictures, for so many customers that he finds no time to paint a single one for his own family-not even for Kobo, who wants one so badly to take to the shrine on Wishing Day. As the customers come and go, Kobo has a chance to observe many types of people and to consider many different kinds of wishes, none of which seems quite right for him. It is all very discouraging until, at last, he begins to get an idea, and then . . . But that is the secret of the story.In meeting Kobo and the many other interesting people in this book, the young reader is introduced to a number of the charming manners and customs of rural Japan, as well as to a number of situations that parallel those experienced by children almost everywhere. As the author expresses it in her introduction: "In this book there are many pictures of ema. We hope that the wishes shown with them, along with the story of Kobo and his family, will bridge customs and culture through our children's seeing that the children of Japan have the same human feeling of affection, of rivalry, of sadness and joy."

Tatsu the Dragon

by Yoshie Noguchi Helen Van Aken

This multicultural children's book tells a mythical Japanese tale about dragons and adventure.Tatsu wasn't a real dragon. Jiro and Zenji made him for a festival parade, out of bamboo hoops and cloth.<P><P> But as soon as he was finished, he began to feel like a real dragon, even though he didn't have any wings.When the magic balloon man blew him up so he could slither around, and gave him a tin horn for a voice, Tatsu thought it was time for him to go out and rescue a beautiful maiden in distress. That was how he met Kiku and the wicked Chief Executioner; and how, in the end, he got his wings.Young readers can follow Tatsu on his adventures all over Japan, from the Fire Festival on an island in the Inland Sea (where he was mistaken for a fire demon), to the top of an erupting volcano, in an exciting story set in the authentic Japan of feudal times.

Showing 1 through 6 of 6 results

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