Browse Results What Format Should I Choose?

Showing 1 through 25 of 71 results Export list as .CSV
Previous   Page: 1 2 3   Next

Megalith, Inc. -- Hay Associates (A)

by John P. Kotter Anne Harlan John A. Seeger

In 1969, Megalith centralized its financial and control functions. John Boyd, senior vice president for finance, hired four brilliant young managers to "bring the group out of the stone age." By 1975, this management team had created a near-perfect finance office of 630 employees. But two of the "young stars" have just quit, and Boyd is sure the constraints of salary ceilings are responsible. He talks with a compensation consultant (Hay Associates).

Power, Dependence, and Effective Management

by John P. Kotter

In today's large and complex organizations, the effective performance of most managerial jobs requires one to be skilled at the acquisition and use of power. It is primarily because of the dependence on others inherent in managerial jobs that the dynamics of power necessarily form an important part of a manager's processes. To help cope with dependency relationships, effective managers create, increase, or maintain different types of power over others.

Fred Henderson

by John P. Kotter

Focuses on the management style of Fred Henderson in the context of a relatively stable business environment within Xerox Corporation. To be contrasted with the case, Renn Zaphiropoulos and the videotape, A Day with Renn Zaphiropoulos (9-881-501), which are appropriate for a more dynamic environment.

Renn Zaphiropoulos

by John P. Kotter

Focuses on the management style of Renn Zaphiropoulos in the context of a rapidly changing business environment within Xerox Corporation. To be contrasted with the case, Fred Henderson and the videotape, A Day with Fred Henderson (9-881-502), which are appropriate for a more stable environment.

Mary Kay Cosmetics, Inc.

by John P. Kotter John M. Stengrevics

Introduces the student to Mary Kay Cosmetics, Inc., its business, its strategy, and its organization. Provides the necessary background for understanding the contributions of Mary Kay Ash, the company's founder and chairman.

General Managers

by John P. Kotter

In this unprecedented study of America's leading executives, John Kotter shatters the popular management notion of the effective "generalist" manager who can step into any business or division and run it. Based on his first-hand observations of fifteen top GMs from nine major companies, Kotter persuasively shows that the best manager is actually a specialist who has spent most of his or her career in one industry, learning its intricacies and establishing cooperative working relationships. Acquiring the painstaking knowledge and large, informal networks vital to being a successful manager takes years; outsiders, no matter how talented or well-trained seldom can do as well, this in-depth profile reveals. Much more than a fascinating collective portrait of the day-to-day activities of today's top executives, The General Managers provides stimulating new insights into the nature of modern management and the tactics of its most accomplished practitioners.

Power and Influence

by John P. Kotter

In today's complex work world, things no longer get done simply because someone issues an order and someone else follows it. Most of us work in socially intricate organizations where we need the help not only of subordinates but of colleagues, superiors, and outsiders to accomplish our goals. This often leaves us in a "power gap" because we must depend on people over whom we have little or no explicit control. This is a book about how to bridge that gap: how to exercise the power and influence you need to get things done through others when your responsibilities exceed your formal authority. Full of original ideas and expert insights about how organizations-and the people in them-function, Power and Influence goes further, demonstrating that lower-level personnel also need strong leadership skills and interpersonal know-how to perform well. Kotter shows how you can develop sufficient resources of "unofficial" power and influence to achieve goals, steer clear of conflicts, foster creative team behavior, and gain the cooperation and support you need from subordinates, coworkers, superiors-even people outside your department or organization. He also shows how you can avoid the twin traps of naivete and cynicism when dealing with power relationships, and how to use your power without abusing it. Power and Influence is essential for top managers who need to overcome the infighting, foot-dragging, and politicking that can destroy both morale and profits; for middle managers who don't want their careers sidetracked by unproductive power struggles; for professionals hindered by bureaucratic obstacles and deadline delays; and for staff workers who have to "manage the boss." This is not a book for those who want to "grab" power for their own ends. But if you'd like to create smooth, responsive working relationships and increase your personal effectiveness on the job, Kotter can show you how-and make the dynamics of power work for you instead of against you.

Corporate Culture and Performance

by John P. Kotter

Going far beyond previous empirical work, John Kotter and James Heskett provide the first comprehensive critical analysis of how the "culture" of a corporation powerfully influences its economic performance, for better or for worse. Through painstaking research at such firms as Hewlett-Packard, Xerox, ICI, Nissan, and First Chicago, as well as a quantitative study of the relationship between culture and performance in more than 200 companies, the authors describe how shared values and unwritten rules can profoundly enhance economic success or, conversely, lead to failure to adapt to changing markets and environments. With penetrating insight, Kotter and Heskett trace the roots of both healthy and unhealthy cultures, demonstrating how easily the latter emerge, especially in firms which have experienced much past success. Challenging the widely held belief that "strong" corporate cultures create excellent business performance, Kotter and Heskett show that while many shared values and institutionalized practices can promote good performances in some instances, those cultures can also be characterized by arrogance, inward focus, and bureaucracy -- features that undermine an organization's ability to adapt to change. They also show that even "contextually or strategically appropriate" cultures -- ones that fit a firm's strategy and business context -- will not promote excellent performance over long periods of time unless they facilitate the adoption of strategies and practices that continuously respond to changing markets and new competitive environments. Fundamental to the process of reversing unhealthy cultures and making them more adaptive, the authors assert, is effective leadership. At the heart of this groundbreaking book, Kotter and Heskett describe how executives in ten corporations established new visions, aligned and motivated their managers to provide leadership to serve their customers, employees, and stockholders, and thus created more externally focused and responsive cultures.

Changing the Culture at British Airways

by John P. Kotter James K. Leahey

In just 10 years, 1980-1990, British Airways turned around both its declining image and financial situation. Focusing on the paramount importance of customer service, British Airways went from "bloody awful" to "bloody awesome." Experiencing a financial crisis in 1981 and trying to meet the challenges of privatization helped the people at British Airways focus on changing their culture through reorganization and instituting new beliefs.

Force For Change

by John P. Kotter

The critics who despair of the coming of imaginative, charismatic leaders to replace the so-called manipulative caretakers of American corporations don't tell us much about what leadership actually is, or, for that matter, what management is either. Now, John P. Kotter, who focused on why we have a leadership crisis in The Leadership Factor shows here, with compelling evidence, what leadership really means today, why it is rarely associated with larger-than-life charismatics, precisely how it is different from management, and yet why both good leadership and management are essential for business success, especially for complex organizations operating in changing environments. Leadership, Kotter clearly demonstrates, is for the most part not a god-like figure transforming subordinates into superhumans, but is in fact a process that creates change -- a process which often involves hundreds or even thousands of "little acts of leadership" orchestrated by people who have the profound insight to realize this. Building on his landmark study of 15 successful general managers, Kotter presents detailed accounts of how senior and middle managers in major corporations, in close concert with colleagues and subordinates, were able to create a leadership process that put into action hundreds of commonsense ideas and procedures that, in combination with competent management, produced extraordinary results. This leadership turned NCR from a loser to a big winner in automated teller machines, despite intense competition from IBM. The same process at American Express and SAS helped businesses grow dramatically despite the fact that they were "mature" and "commodity-like." Kotter also shows how leadership turned around operations at P&G and Kodak; produced huge business successes at PepsiCo, ARCO, and ConAgra; and made the impossible occasionally happen at Digital. Thousands of companies today are overmanaged and underled, John Kotter concludes, not because managers lack charisma, but because far too few executives have a clear understanding of what leadership is and what it can accomplish. Without such a vision, even the most capable people have great difficulty trying to lead effectively and to create the cultures which will help others to lead.

Corporate Culture and Performance

by John P. Kotter James L. Heskett

Going far beyond previous empirical work, John Kotter and James Heskett provide the first comprehensive critical analysis of how the "culture" of a corporation powerfully influences its economic performance, for better or for worse. Through painstaking research at such firms as Hewlett-Packard, Xerox, ICI, Nissan, and First Chicago, as well as a quantitative study of the relationship between culture and performance in more than 200 companies, the authors describe how shared values and unwritten rules can profoundly enhance economic success or, conversely, lead to failure to adapt to changing markets and environments.With penetrating insight, Kotter and Heskett trace the roots of both healthy and unhealthy cultures, demonstrating how easily the latter emerge, especially in firms which have experienced much past success. Challenging the widely held belief that "strong" corporate cultures create excellent business performance, Kotter and Heskett show that while many shared values and institutionalized practices can promote good performances in some instances, those cultures can also be characterized by arrogance, inward focus, and bureaucracy -- features that undermine an organization's ability to adapt to change. They also show that even "contextually or strategically appropriate" cultures -- ones that fit a firm's strategy and business context -- will not promote excellent performance over long periods of time unless they facilitate the adoption of strategies and practices that continuously respond to changing markets and new competitive environments.Fundamental to the process of reversing unhealthy cultures and making them more adaptive, the authors assert, is effective leadership. At the heart of this groundbreaking book, Kotter and Heskett describe how executives in ten corporations established new visions, aligned and motivated their managers to provide leadership to serve their customers, employees, and stockholders, and thus created more externally focused and responsive cultures.

Jack Thomas

by John P. Kotter Andrew Burtis

This redisguised version of an earlier case, Tom Levick, provides an updated setting but does not change the teaching objectives. Chronicles the first six weeks of experience on the job for a recent business school graduate. Emphasis is on managing upwards--particularly with respect to errors discovered by the protaganist for which his boss was responsible. Provides background data.

Recruiting at Bowles Hollowell Conner & Co.

by Herminia Ibarra John P. Kotter John J. Gabarro Andrew Burtis

Examines the recruiting process of Bowles Hollowell Conner & Co. (BHC), an investment banking firm known for its work with middle market companies. Specifically, presents a profile of the firm and its recruiting process and then examines that process through the firm's recruiting efforts at Harvard Business School (HBS). Includes the resumes of 17 second-year HBS students who sought interviews for an associate position with BHC and raises the issue of how interview selections were made from those resumes.

The New Rules

by John P. Kotter

Based on a landmark twenty-year study of 115 members of the Harvard Business School's Class of 1974, this vital and important book describes how the globalization of markets and competition is altering career paths, wage levels, the structure and functioning of corporations, and the very nature of work itself.THE NEW RULES INCLUDE:New Rule #1: Conventional career paths through large corporations no longer lead to success as they once did;New Rule #4: The greatest opportunities have shifted away from professional management in manufacturing to consulting and other service industries;New Rule #7: Success requires high personal standards and a strong desire to win.

The New Rules: How to Succeed in Today's Post-corporate World

by John P. Kotter

Based on a landmark twenty-year study of 115 members of the Harvard Business School's Class of 1974, this vital and important book describes how the globalization of markets and competition is altering career paths, wage levels, the structure and functioning of corporations, and the very nature of work itself. THE NEW RULES INCLUDE: New Rule #1: Conventional career paths through large corporations no longer lead to success as they once did; New Rule #4: The greatest opportunities have shifted away from professional management in manufacturing to consulting and other service industries; New Rule #7: Success requires high personal standards and a strong desire to win.

Anchoring New Approaches in the Culture: Overcoming Barriers to Organizational Change

by John P. Kotter

When the new practices made in a transformation effort are not compatible with the relevant cultures, they will always be subject to regression. Changes in a work group, a division, or an entire company can come undone, even after years of effort, because the new approaches haven't been anchored firmly in group norms and values. This chapter was originally published as Chapter 10 of "Leading Change."

Communicating the Change Vision: Overcoming Barriers to Organizational Change

by John P. Kotter

Communicating a vision for change and gaining understanding and commitment to a new direction is never an easy task, especially in large enterprises. However, the new vision must be constantly and effectively communicated in order to create a shared sense of a desirable future, which helps motivate and coordinate the transformation effort. This chapter was originally published as Chapter 6 of "Leading Change."

Consolidating Gains and Producing More Change: Overcoming Barriers to Organizational Change

by John P. Kotter

Major change often takes a long time, especially in big organizations. Short term wins are essential to keep the change effort going, but the celebration of those wins can be lethal if urgency is lost. If you let up before the job is done, critical momentum can be lost and regression may follow. This chapter was originally published as Chapter 9 of "Leading Change."

Creating the Guiding Coalition: Overcoming Barriers to Organizational Change

by John P. Kotter

Because major change is so difficult to accomplish, a powerful force is required to sustain the process. A strong guiding coalition is always needed-one with the right composition, level of trust, and shared objective. This chapter was originally published as Chapter 4 of "Leading Change."

Developing a Vision and Strategy: Overcoming Barriers to Organizational Change

by John P. Kotter

Leading change successfully requires a basic vision, or a picture of the future with some implicit or explicit commentary on why people should strive to create that future. A strong vision clarifies the general direction of change, motivates people to take action in the right direction, and helps coordinate the actions of different people in a fast and efficient way. This chapter was originally published as Chapter 5 of "Leading Change."

Empowering Employees for Broad-Based Action: Overcoming Barriers to Organizational Change

by John P. Kotter

With the right structure, training, systems, and supervisors to build on a well-communicated vision, increasing numbers of firms are finding that they can tap an enormous source of power to improve organizational performance-they can mobilize hundreds or thousands of people to help provide leadership to produce needed changes. This chapter was originally published as Chapter 7 of "Leading Change."

Establishing a Sense of Urgency: Overcoming Barriers to Organizational Change

by John P. Kotter

Creating change in any organization is extremely difficult and requires a large number of employees to collaborate effectively. Creating a sense of urgency is crucial to inspiring needed cooperation, initiative, and willingness to make sacrifices. This chapter was originally published as Chapter 3 of "Leading Change."

Generating Short-Term Wins: Overcoming Barriers to Organizational Change

by John P. Kotter

Major change takes time, sometimes lots of time. But running a transformation effort without serious attention to short-term wins is extremely risky. Planning for short-term results can provide much needed evidence that hard work, and investment of resources on behalf of change is paying off. This chapter was originally published as Chapter 8 of "Leading Change."

Leadership and Lifelong Learning: Leading Change in the Twenty-First Century Organization

by John P. Kotter

The key to creating and sustaining a successful twenty-first century organization is leadership-not only at the top of the hierarchy, but also throughout the enterprise. And fortunately, according to John Kotter, leaders are not born, but are made over a lifetime of learning. This chapter examines the relationship between lifelong learning, the development of leadership skills, and the capacity to succeed in the future. This chapter was originally published as Chapter 11 of "Leading Change."

Leading Change

by John P. Kotter

John Kotter examines the efforts of more than 100 companies to remake themselves into better competitors. He identifies the most common mistakes leaders and managers make in attempting to create change and offers an eight-step process.

Showing 1 through 25 of 71 results Export list as .CSV
Previous   Page: 1 2 3   Next

Help

Select your format based upon: 1) how you want to read your book, and 2) compatibility with your reading tool. To learn more about using Bookshare with your device, visit the Help Center.

Here is an overview of the specialized formats that Bookshare offers its members with links that go to the Help Center for more information.

  • Bookshare Web Reader - a customized reading tool for Bookshare members offering all the features of DAISY with a single click of the "Read Now" link.
  • DAISY (Digital Accessible Information System) - a digital book file format. DAISY books from Bookshare are DAISY 3.0 text files that work with just about every type of access technology that reads text. Books that contain images will have the download option of ‘DAISY Text with Images’.
  • BRF (Braille Refreshable Format) - digital Braille for use with refreshable Braille devices and Braille embossers.
  • MP3 (Mpeg audio layer 3) - Provides audio only with no text. These books are created with a text-to-speech engine and spoken by Kendra, a high quality synthetic voice from Ivona. Any device that supports MP3 playback is compatible.
  • DAISY Audio - Similar to the Daisy 3.0 option above; however, this option uses MP3 files created with our text-to-speech engine that utilizes Ivonas Kendra voice. This format will work with Daisy Audio compatible players such as Victor Reader Stream and Read2Go.