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Ann Veronica

by H. G. Wells

Ann Veronica: With an introduction by Flora Fraser

by H. G. Wells

Stong-willed, reckless and fiercely independent, Ann Veronica Stanley is determined to be a 'Person', to work, love and, above all, to live. Walking away from her stifling father and the social conventions of her time, she leaves drab suburbia for Edwardian London and encounters an unknown world of suffragettes, Fabians and free love. But it is only when she meets the charismatic Capes that she truly confronts the meaning of her new found freedom. Ann Veronica caused a sensation, damned in the press and preached against from the pulpits when it was first published in 1909 due to Wells' groundbreaking treatment of female sexuality.

The Country of the Blind: and Other Science-Fiction Stories

by H. G. Wells Martin Gardner

"In the country of the blind, the one-eyed man is king." Or is he? In H. G. Wells' acclaimed tale, a stranded mountaineer encounters an isolated society in which his apparent advantage proves less than valuable. This thought-provoking fable is accompanied by other short stories, including "The Star," a gripping tale about a massive celestial object hurtling toward the Earth, as well as "The New Accelerator," "The Remarkable Case of Davidson's Eyes," "Under the Knife," and "The Queer Story of Brownlow's Newspaper." With the 1895 publication of his first novel, The Time Machine, Wells established himself as the foremost science-fiction writer of his era. This entertaining collection was selected and edited by Martin Gardner, who also provides an Afterword that offers insight into the liveliness and originality of Wells' imagination.

The Croquet Player

by H. G. Wells

A spirit-corrupting evil is invading the remote English village of Cainsmarsh. Is it real or a paranoid fantasy generated by an even darker, worldwide threat?

First and Last Things

by H. G. Wells

First and Last Things is a 1908 work of philosophy by H. G. Wells setting forth his beliefs in four "books" entitled "Metaphysics," "Of Belief," "Of General Conduct," and "Some Personal Things." Parts of the book were published in the Independent Magazine in July and August 1908. Wells revised the book extensively in 1917, in response to his religious conversion, but later published a further revision in 1929 that restored much of the book to its earlier form. Its main intellectual influences are Darwinism and certain German thinkers Wells had read, such as August Weismann. The pragmatism of William James, who had become a friend of Wells, was also an influence.

The First Men in the Moon

by H. G. Wells

As I sit down to write here amidst the shadows of vine-leaves under the blue sky of southern Italy, it comes to me with a certain quality of astonishment that my participation in these amazing adventures of Mr. Cavor was, after all, the outcome of the purest accident. It might have been any one. I fell into these things at a time when I thought myself removed from the slightest possibility of disturbing experiences. I had gone to Lympne because I had imagined it the most uneventful place in the world. "Here, at any rate," said I, "I shall find peace and a chance to work!" And this book is the sequel. So utterly at variance is destiny with all the little plans of men. I may perhaps mention here that very recently I had come an ugly cropper in certain business enterprises. Sitting now surrounded by all the circumstances of wealth, there is a luxury in admitting my extremity. I can admit, even, that to a certain extent my disasters were conceivably of my own making. It may be there are directions in which I have some capacity, but the conduct of business operations is not among these. But in those days I was young, and my youth among other objectionable forms took that of a pride in my capacity for affairs. I am young still in years, but the things that have happened to me have rubbed something of the youth from my mind. Whether they have brought any wisdom to light below it is a more doubtful matter.

The First Men In The Moon

by H. G. Wells

'As we saw it first it was the wildest and most desolate of scenes. We were in an enormous amphitheatre, a vast circular plain, the floor of the giant crater. Its cliff-like wall closed us in on every side . . .'Thanks to the discovery of an anti-gravity metal, Cavorite, two Victorian Englishman decide to tackle the most prestigious goal - space travel. They construct a sphere that will ultimately take them to the moon. On landing, they encounter what seems like an utterly barren landscape but they soon find signs that the planet was once very much alive. Then they hear curious hammering sounds from beneath the surface, and come face to face with the Selenites, a race of insect-like aliens living in a rigidly organised hive society.

The First Men in the Moon

by H. G. Wells

A pair of unlikely explorers journey to the moon in this imaginative tale of science and adventure from the author of The War of the Worlds Hounded by creditors, Mr. Bedford retreats to a remote English village, where he meets the eccentric Mr. Cavor. Though he may not look it, Cavor is a genius and one of the world’s greatest inventors. His breakthrough is cavorite, an astonishing new substance manufactured from helium that is not bound by the laws of gravity. Bedford immediately sees the business potential of Cavor’s creation, reckoning a ship made of cavorite could take him the moon—the first step on a path to riches beyond his wildest dreams. When Bedford and Cavor set out for the moon in a cavorite sphere, they find the Earth’s satellite to be more wonderful than either of them ever imagined. But they soon discover they are not alone on the lush lunar surface—and the natives are not exactly friendly. A thrilling adventure story that offers fascinating insights into the nature of mankind, The First Men in the Moon is a timeless classic from “the father of modern science fiction.” This ebook has been professionally proofread to ensure accuracy and readability on all devices.

The First Men in the Moon

by H. G. Wells Ursula K. Le Guin

"Why do people read science fiction? In hopes of receiving such writing as this--a ravishingly accurate vision of things unseen; an utterly unexpected yet necessary beauty." So says Ursula K. Le Guin in her Introduction to The First Men in the Moon, H. G. Wells's 1901 tale of space travel. <P><P>Heavily criticized upon publication for its fantastic ideas, it is now justly considered a science fiction classic. Cavor, a brilliant scientist who accidentally produces a gravity-defying substance, builds a spaceship and, along with the materialistic Bedford, travels to the moon. The coldly intellectual Cavor seeks knowledge, while Bedford seeks fortune. Instead of insight and gold they encounter the Selenites, a horrifying race of biologically engineered creatures who viciously, and successfully, defend their home. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Floor Games; a companion volume to "Little Wars"

by H. G. Wells

The jolliest indoor games for boys and girls demand a floor, and the home that has no floor upon which games may be played falls so far short of happiness. It must be a floor covered with linoleum or cork carpet, so that toy soldiers and such-like will stand up upon it, and of a color and surface that will take and show chalk marks; the common green- colored cork carpet without a pattern is the best of all. It must be no highway to other rooms, and well lit and airy. Occasionally, alas! it must be scrubbed - and then a truce to Floor Games. Upon such a floor may be made an infinitude of imaginative games, not only keeping boys and girls happy for days together, but building up a framework of spacious and inspiring ideas in them for after life. The men of tomorrow will gain new strength from nursery floors. I am going to tell of some of these games and what is most needed to play them; I have tried them all and a score of others like them with my sons, and all of the games here illustrated have been set out by us.

The Food of the Gods

by H. G. Wells

Two scientists develop a foodstuff that causes unparalleled growth in animals and humans. The results of their experimentation lead to chaos and unforseen consequences throughout the land.THE FOOD OF THE GODS deals with many issues which are still present in science today and is a both witty and disturbing tale.

The Food Of The Gods and How It Came

by H. G. Wells

Several novels by H.G. Wells have shown his extraordinary power of vividly realizing the most daringly-imagined conditions. "The Food of the Gods" is a surpassing example of these powers; and in it Mr. Wells combines them with a curious but always very telling addition of humor and pathos.

H. G. Wells

by H. G. Wells Michael A. Cramer

He was the first to popularize the concept of time travel. He disturbed-and fascinated-us with a frightening doctor's island. He wrote of an invisible man, of men on the moon, and of a war of the worlds. He has influenced countless other writers, artists, and even scientists. H. G. Wells is one of the most acclaimed science fiction writers who ever lived, and six of his classic tales are collected in this book for readers to treasure.H. G. Wells includes The Time Machine, The Island of Dr Moreau, The Invisble Man, The War of the Worlds, The First Men in the Moon, and The Food of the Gods. Readers new to this remarkable author will delight in these amazing stories, while fans of Wells will enjoy the insightful introduction by an expert on the author's life and work.

H. G. Wells The Dover Reader

by H. G. Wells

Trained in science and as a teacher, H. G. Wells (1866-1946) harbored a passionate concern for political issues. Wells's interests are reflected in his pioneering works of science fiction, which involve time travel, space exploration, alien invasion, and experiments gone awry. A century later, his tales of obsession, revelation, and discovery remain compellingly readable and relevant.This anthology offers readers complete and unabridged versions of Wells's most influential novels: The War of the Worlds, The Time Machine, The Island of Dr. Moreau, and The Invisible Man. In addition, five famous short stories include "The Country of the Blind," "The Purple Pileus," "The Crystal Egg," "The Door in the Wall," and the first tale to address bio-terrorism, "The Stolen Bacillus."

H. G. Wells: The Social Novels: Love and Mr Lewisham, Kipps, Ann Veronica, Tono-Bungay, The History of Mr Polly

by H. G. Wells

DISCOVER A DIFFERENT SIDE TO H. G. WELLS . . . H.G. Wells's social tales caused a sensation when they were first published in the early twentieth century. Piercingly funny, yet sympathetic, and containing a cast of colourful characters, they have drawn comparisons to the works of Dickens and Evelyn Waugh.From the hapless Kipps, who is plunged into a world of high society, the rules of which he fails to understand, to Mr Polly, the draper, desperate to escape his shop and nagging wife, to Ann Veronica, a young woman rebelling against her father's stern patriarchal rule, these satires of Edwardian mores are both horribly funny and provoke questions about the class system and opportunities for social reform. The social novels include LOVE AND MR LEWISHAM (1900), KIPPS (1905), ANN VERONICA (1909), TONO-BUNGAY (1909) and THE HISTORY OF MR POLLY (1910).

The H. G. Wells Trilogy

by H. G. Wells

H. G. Wells was one of the most influential science fiction writers of all times. His three most important novels The Time Machine, The War of the Worlds, and The Island of Dr. Moreau still seem as fresh today as when he first wrote them. The Time Machine explores human nature. The Time Traveler finds himself in 802,701 A.D., where he meets the peaceful Eloi and encounters the violent Morlocks. Wells uses these two descendants of man to explore evil and its causes, drawing conclusions that might surprise you in this riveting tale that has stood the test of time. This deluxe edition has the deleted portion of chapter eleven that ran in the original serialization, but was removed by Wells for book publication; it runs after the story as the "Gray Man." In addition to the "Gray Man" this edition also contains the full text of "The Chronic Argonauts" Wells' first time travel story which he borrows liberally from for The Time Machine. In War of the Worlds Mankind finds itself in a fight for its very survival when invaders from Mars land on Earth. Using their vastly superior technology the Martians make short order of all the great powers of Earth, laying waste to everything in their path. The novel follows an unnamed man as he flees for his life while trying to locate his wife in the shattered ruins of Earth. Powerful and insightful. Island of Doctor Moreau: Edward Prendick finds himself adrift at sea, a lone survivor of a ship wreck. He spends more than a week drifting without food or water. Pendrick consigns himself to death, but fate intervenes and delivers him to an unknown Island. The terrors that await him on Doctor Moreau's island are far worse than what he has just been rescued from or anything that he could imagined.

The History of Mr Polly

by H. G. Wells

Mr Polly is an ordinary middle-aged man who is tired of his wife's nagging and his dreary job as the owner of a regional gentleman's outfitters. Faced with the threat of bankruptcy, he concludes that the only way to escape his frustrating existence is by burning his shop to the ground, and killing himself. Unexpected events, however, conspire at the last moment to lead the bewildered Mr Polly to a bright new future - after he saves a life, fakes his death, and escapes to a life of heroism, hope and ultimate happiness.

The History Of Mr Polly: With an introduction by Giles Foden

by H. G. Wells

Mr Polly is an ordinary middle-aged man who is tired of his wife's nagging and his dreary job as the owner of a regional gentleman's outfitters. Faced with the threat of bankruptcy, he concludes that the only way to escape his frustrating existence is by burning his shop to the ground and killing himself. Unexpected events, however, conspire to lead the bewildered Mr Polly to a bright new future - after he saves a life, fakes his death, and escapes to a world of heroism and hope.

In the Days of the Comet

by H. G. Wells

I SAW a gray-haired man, a figure of hale age, sitting at a desk and writing. He seemed to be in a room in a tower, very high, so that through the tall window on his left one perceived only distances, a remote horizon of sea, a headland and that vague haze and glitter in the sunset that many miles away marks a city. All the appointments of this room were orderly and beautiful, and in some subtle quality, in this small difference and that, new to me and strange. They were in no fashion I could name, and the simple costume the man wore suggested neither period nor country. It might, I thought, be the Happy Future, or Utopia, or the Land of Simple Dreams; an errant mote of memory, Henry James's phrase and story of "The Great Good Place," twinkled across my mind, and passed and left no light. The man I saw wrote with a thing like a fountain pen, a modern touch that prohibited any historical retrospection, and as he finished each sheet, writing in an easy flowing hand, he added it to a growing pile upon a graceful little table under the window. His last done sheets lay loose, partly covering others that were clipped together into fascicles.

The Invisible Man

by Arthur C. Clarke H. G. Wells

ONE OF THE MOST BELOVED WORKS OF SCIENCE FICTIONH.G. Wells' classic The Invisible Man is an artful combination of a psychological thriller and science fiction novel. A young scientist who discovers the secret of invisibility feels initial joy at his newfound freedoms and abilities, but quickly turns to despair when he realizes the many things he has sacrificed in the pursuit of science. While he struggles to create the formula that will restore his visibility and his connection to other people, murder and mayhem ensue.THE ART OF THE NOVELLAToo short to be a novel, too long to be a short story, the novella is generally unrecognized by academics and publishers but beloved and practiced by literature's greatest writers. The Art of the Novella Series celebrates this renegade art form and its practitioners. The series has been recognized for its "excellence in design" by AIGA.

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