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A Day in the Life of Roger Angell

by Roger Angell

Witty and deftly drawn parodies from a literary legendRoger Angell has a long history with the New Yorker: the son of fiction editor Katharine White and the stepson of E. B. White, Angell has spent decades writing and working for the magazine, to which he has contributed across genres and gained special renown for his essays on baseball. With A Day in the Life of Roger Angell, the author's gifts as an urbane humorist come to the fore. The pieces here include two of Angell's famous Christmas poems, parodies--of horoscopes, sports broadcasts, and Lawrence Durrell--and a tense correspondence over a short fiction contest that pays only in baked goods. Combined, these miniatures form a funny and charming chronicle of Manhattan life, as experienced both on the ground and in the city's most literary circles.

Five Seasons

by Roger Angell

Roger Angell's chronicle of baseball's most fascinating and unforgettable yearsClassic New Yorker sportswriter Roger Angell calls 1972 to 1976 "the most important half-decade in the history of the game." The early to mid-1970s brought unprecedented changes to America's ancient pastime: astounding performances by Nolan Ryan and Hank Aaron; the intensity of the "best-ever" 1975 World Series between the Cincinnati Reds and the Boston Red Sox; the changes growing from bitter and extended labor strikes and lockouts; and the vast new influence of network television on the game. Angell, always a fan as well as a writer, casts a knowing but noncynical eye on these events, offering a fresh perspective to baseball's continuing appeal during this brilliant and transformative era.

Five Seasons: A Baseball Companion

by Roger Angell

Five Seasons covers the baseball seasons from 1972 through 1976, described as the "most significant half decade in the history of the game." The era was notable for the remarkable individual feats of Hank Aaron, Lou Brock, and Nolan Ryan, among others.

Game Time: A Baseball Companion

by Roger Angell Steve Kettmann

"Roger Angell has been writing about baseball for more than forty years ... and for my money he's the best there is at it," says novelist Richard Ford in his introduction to Game Time. Angell's famous explorations of the summer game are built on acute observation and joyful participation, conveyed in a prose style as admired and envied as Ted Williams's swing. Angell on Fenway Park in September, on Bob Gibson brooding in retirement, on Tom Seaver in mid-windup, on the abysmal early and recent Mets, on a scout at work in backcountry Kentucky, on Pete Rose and Willie Mays and Pedro Martinez, on the astounding Barry Bonds at Pac Bell Park, and more, carry us through the arc of the season with refreshed understanding and pleasure. This collection represents Angell's best writings, from spring training in 1962 to the explosive World Series of 2002.

Here is New York

by E. B. White Roger Angell

In the summer of 1948, E.B. White sat in a New York City hotel room and, sweltering in the heat, wrote a remarkable pristine essay, Here is New York. Perceptive, funny, and nostalgic, the author's stroll around Manhattan--with the reader arm-in-arm--remains the quintessential love letter to the city, written by one of America's foremost literary figures. Here is New York has been chosen by The New York Times as one of the ten best books ever written about the city. The New Yorker calls it "the wittiest essay, and one of the most perceptive, ever done on the city."

Late Innings: A Baseball Companion

by Roger Angell

Covers the 5 seasons of baseball, from 1977 to 1981, a time of immense popularity for baseball.

Let Me Finish

by Roger Angell

Widely known as an original and graceful writer, Roger Angell has developed a devoted following through his essays in the New Yorker. Now, in Let Me Finish, a deeply personal, fresh form of autobiography, he takes an unsentimental look at his early days as a boy growing up in Prohibition-era New York with a remarkable father; a mother, Katharine White, who was a founding editor of the New Yorker; and a famous stepfather, the writer E. B. White.Intimate, funny, and moving portraits form the book's centerpiece as Angell remembers his surprising relatives, his early attraction to baseball in the time of Ruth and Gehrig and DiMaggio, and his vivid colleagues during a long career as a New Yorker writer and editor. Infused with pleasure and sadness, Angell's disarming memoir also evokes an attachment to life's better moments.

Once More Around the Park: A Baseball Reader

by Roger Angell

The most celebrated baseball writer of our time has selected his favorite pieces from the last forty years in this definitive volume of his most memorable work. As a chronicler of the game, he's in a class with Ring Lardner and Red Smith. --Newsweek

A Pitcher's Story: Innings with David Cone

by Roger Angell

There is no big league pitcher who is more respected for his skill than David Cone. In his stellar career Cone has won multiple championships and countless professional accolades. Along the way, the perennial all-star has had to adjust to five different ball clubs, recover from a career-threatening arm aneurysm, cope with the lofty expectations that are standard for the game's highest paid players, and overcome a humbling three-month, eight-game losing streak in the summer of 2000. Cone granted exclusive and unlimited access to baseball's most respected writer--Roger Angell of The New Yorker. The result is just what baseball fans everywhere would expect from Angell: an extraordinary inside account of a superstar.

The Roger Angell Baseball Collection

by Roger Angell

A captivating collection of three nonfiction baseball books by acclaimed writer Roger Angell: The Summer Game, Five Seasons, and Season TicketThe Summer Game, originally published in 1972, is a stunning collection of Angell's essays on the major leagues, covering a span of ten seasons. Angell brilliantly captures the nation's most beloved sport through the 1960s, spanning both the winning teams and the "horrendous losers," and including famed players Sandy Koufax, Bob Gibson, Brooks Robinson, Frank Robinson, Willie Mays, and more. With the panache of a seasoned sportswriter and the energy of an avid baseball fan, Angell's sports journalism is an insightful and compelling look at the great American pastime.In Five Seasons, New Yorker sportswriter Roger Angell calls 1972 to 1976 "the most important half-decade in the history of the game." The early to mid-1970s brought unprecedented changes to America's ancient pastime: astounding performances by Nolan Ryan and Hank Aaron; the intensity of the "best-ever" 1975 World Series between the Cincinnati Reds and the Boston Red Sox; the changes growing from bitter and extended labor strikes and lockouts; and the vast new influence of network television on the game. Angell, always a fan as well as a writer, casts a knowing but noncynical eye on these events, offering a fresh perspective to baseball's continuing appeal during this brilliant and transformative era.And in Season Ticket, Roger Angell once again journeys through five seasons of America's national pastime--chronicling the larger-than-life narratives and on-field intricacies of baseball from 1982 to 1987. Angell's collected New Yorker essays, written in his unique voice as a fan and baseball aficionado, cover the development of the game both on the diamond and off. While diving into subjects such as Sparky Anderson's '84 Detroit Tigers, the legendary 1986 World Series and the Curse of the Bambino, and the increasingly pervasive issue of player drug use, Angell reveals the craft and technique of the game, and the unforgettable stories of those who played it.

Season Ticket

by Roger Angell

Angell's absorbing collection traces the highs and lows of major-league baseball in the 1980s Roger Angell once again journeys through five seasons of America's national pastime--chronicling the larger-than-life narratives and on-field intricacies of baseball from 1982 to 1987. Angell's collected New Yorker essays, written in his unique voice as a fan and baseball aficionado, cover the development of the game both on the diamond and off. While diving into subjects such as Sparky Anderson's '84 Detroit Tigers, the legendary 1986 World Series and the Curse of the Bambino, and the increasingly pervasive issue of player drug use, Angell reveals the craft and technique of the game, and the unforgettable stories of those who played it.

Season Ticket: A Baseball Companion

by Roger Angell

A collection of pieces on the 1983 to 1987 baseball seasons. In "Season Ticket", Angell carefully examines the intricacies of catching, infield play and pitching, the problems of running a club, the mysteries of managing, and the appeal of baseball's Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y.

The Summer Game

by Roger Angell

"The Summer Game", Roger Angell's first book on the sport, changed baseball writing forever. Thoughtful, funny, appreciative of the elegance of the game and the passions invested by players and fans, it goes beyond the usual sports reporter's beat to examine baseball's complex place in our American psyche. Between the miseries of the 1962 expansion Mets and a classic 1971 World Series between the Pirates and the Orioles, Angell finds baseball in the 1960s as a game in transition --- marked by league expansion, uprooted franchises, the growing hegemony of television, the dominance of pitchers, uneasy relations between players and owners, and mounting competition from other sports for the fans' dollars. Willie Mays, Roberto Clemente, Brooks Robinson, Bob Gibson, Sandy Koufax, Carl Yastrzemski, Tom Seaver, Jim Palmer, and Casey Stengel are seen here with fresh clarity and pleasure.

The Summer Game

by Roger Angell

A classic collection of early sportswriting by renowned reporter Roger AngellAcclaimed New Yorker writer Roger Angell's first book on baseball, The Summer Game, originally published in 1972, is a stunning collection of his essays on the major leagues, covering a span of ten seasons. Angell brilliantly captures the nation's most beloved sport through the 1960s, spanning both the winning teams and the "horrendous losers," and including famed players Sandy Koufax, Bob Gibson, Brooks Robinson, Frank Robinson, Willie Mays, and more. With the panache of a seasoned sportswriter and the energy of an avid baseball fan, Angell's sports journalism is an insightful and compelling look at the great American pastime.

Showing 1 through 14 of 14 results

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