Browse Results What Format Should I Choose?

Showing 1 through 11 of 11 results

The 40s: The Story of a Decade

by E. B. White Zadie Smith J. D. Salinger David Remnick The New Yorker Magazine

Including contributions by W. H. Auden * Elizabeth Bishop * John Cheever * Janet Flanner * John Hersey * Langston Hughes * Shirley Jackson * A. J. Liebling * William Maxwell * Carson McCullers * Joseph Mitchell * Vladimir Nabokov * Ogden Nash * John O'Hara * George Orwell * V. S. Pritchett * Lillian Ross * Stephen Spender * Lionel Trilling * Rebecca West * E. B. White * Williams Carlos Williams * Edmund Wilson And featuring new perspectives by Joan Acocella * Hilton Als * Dan Chiasson * David Denby * Jill Lepore * Louis Menand * Susan Orlean * George Packer * David Remnick * Alex Ross * Peter Schjeldahl * Zadie Smith * Judith ThurmanThe 1940s are the watershed decade of the twentieth century, a time of trauma and upheaval but also of innovation and profound and lasting cultural change. This is the era of Fat Man and Little Boy, of FDR and Stalin, but also of Casablanca and Citizen Kane, zoot suits and Christian Dior, Duke Ellington and Edith Piaf. The 1940s were when The New Yorker came of age. A magazine that was best known for its humor and wry social observation would extend itself, offering the first in-depth reporting from Hiroshima and introducing American readers to the fiction of Vladimir Nabokov and the poetry of Elizabeth Bishop. In this enthralling book, masterly contributions from the pantheon of great writers who graced The New Yorker's pages throughout the decade are placed in history by the magazine's current writers. Included in this volume are seminal profiles of the decade's most fascinating figures: Albert Einstein, Marshal Pétain, Thomas Mann, Le Corbusier, Walt Disney, and Eleanor Roosevelt. Here are classics in reporting: John Hersey's account of the heroism of a young naval lieutenant named John F. Kennedy; A. J. Liebling's unforgettable depictions of the Fall of France and D Day; Rebecca West's harrowing visit to a lynching trial in South Carolina; Lillian Ross's sly, funny dispatch on the Miss America Pageant; and Joseph Mitchell's imperishable portrait of New York's foremost dive bar, McSorley's. This volume also provides vital, seldom-reprinted criticism. Once again, we are able to witness the era's major figures wrestling with one another's work as it appeared--George Orwell on Graham Greene, W. H. Auden on T. S. Eliot, Lionel Trilling on Orwell. Here are The New Yorker's original takes on The Great Dictator and The Grapes of Wrath, and opening-night reviews of Death of a Salesman and South Pacific. Perhaps no contribution the magazine made to 1940s American culture was more lasting than its fiction and poetry. Included here is an extraordinary selection of short stories by such writers as Shirley Jackson (whose masterpiece "The Lottery" stirred outrage when it appeared in the magazine in 1948) and John Cheever (of whose now-classic story "The Enormous Radio" New Yorker editor Harold Ross said: "It will turn out to be a memorable one, or I am a fish.") Also represented are the great poets of the decade, from Louise Bogan and William Carlos Williams to Theodore Roethke and Langston Hughes. To complete the panorama, today's New Yorker staff, including David Remnick, George Packer, and Alex Ross, look back on the decade through contemporary eyes. Whether it's Louis Menand on postwar cosmopolitanism or Zadie Smith on the decade's breakthroughs in fiction, these new contributions are illuminating, learned, and, above all, entertaining.From the Hardcover edition.

The Autograph Man

by Zadie Smith

Alex-Li Tandem sells autographs. His business is to hunt for names on paper, collect them, sell them, and occasionally fake them--all to give the people what they want: a little piece of Fame. But what does Alex want? Only the return of his father, the end of religion, something for his headache, three different girls, infinite grace, and the rare autograph of forties movie actress Kitty Alexander. With fries. The Autograph Man is a deeply funny existential tour around the hollow trappings of modernity: celebrity, cinema, and the ugly triumph of symbol over experience. It offers further proof that Zadie Smith is one of the most staggeringly talented writers of her generation. ""

Best European Fiction 2010

by Zadie Smith Aleksandar Hemon

Historically, English-language readers have been great fans of European literature, and names like Franz Kafka, Gustave Flaubert, and Thomas Mann are so familiar we hardly think of them as foreign at all. What those writers brought to English-language literature was a wide variety of new ideas, styles, and ways of seeing the world. Yet times have changed, and how much do we even know about the richly diverse literature being written in Europe today? Best European Fiction 2010 is the inaugural installment of what will become an annual anthology of stories from across Europe. Edited by acclaimed Bosnian novelist and MacArthur Genius-Award winner Aleksandar Hemon, and with dozens of editorial, media, and programming partners in the U.S., UK, and Europe, the Best European Fiction series will be a window onto what s happening right now in literary scenes throughout Europe, where the next Kafka, Flaubert, or Mann is waiting to be discovered. List of contributors Preface: Zadie Smith Introduction: Aleksandar Hemon Ornela Vorpsi (Albania): from The Country Where No One Ever Dies Antonio Fian (Austria): from While Sleeping Peter Terrin (Belgium: Dutch): from "The Murderer" Jean-Philippe Toussaint (Belgium: French): "Zidane's Melancholy" Igor Stiks (Bosnia): "At the Sarajevo Market" Georgi Gospodinov (Bulgaria): "And All Turned Moon" Neven Usumovic (Croatia): "Veres" Naja Marie Aidt (Denmark): "Bulbjerg" Elo Viiding (Estonia): "Foreign Women" Juhani Brander (Finland): from Extinction Christine Montalbetti (France): "Hotel Komaba Eminence" (with Haruki Murakami) George Konr d (Hungary): "Jeremiah's Terrible Tale" Steinar Bragi (Iceland): "The Sky Over Thingvellir" Julian Gough (Ireland: English): "The Orphan and the Mob" Ornan Choile in (Ireland: Irish): "Camino" Giulio Mozzi (AKA Carlo Dalcielo) (Italy): "Carlo Doesn't Know How to Read" Inga Abele (Latvia): "Ants and Bumblebees" Mathias Ospelt (Liechtenstein): "Deep In the Snow" Giedra Radvilaviciute? (Lithuania): "The Allure of the Text" Goce Smilevski (Macedonia): "Fourteen Little Gustavs" Stephan Enter (Netherlands): "Resistance" Jon Fosse (Norway): "Waves of Stone" Michal Witkowski (Poland): "Didi" Valter Hugo M e (Portugal): "dona malva and senhor jos ferreiro" Cosmin Manolache (Romania): "Three Hundred Cups" Victor Pelevin (Russia): "Friedmann Space" David Albahari (Serbia): "The Basilica

Best European Fiction 2010

by Zadie Smith Aleksandar Hemon

Historically, English-language readers have been great fans of European literature, and names like Franz Kafka, Gustave Flaubert, and Thomas Mann are so familiar we hardly think of them as foreign at all. What those writers brought to English-language literature was a wide variety of new ideas, styles, and ways of seeing the world. Yet times have changed, and how much do we even know about the richly diverse literature being written in Europe today? Best European Fiction 2010 is the inaugural installment of what will become an annual anthology of stories from across Europe. Edited by acclaimed Bosnian novelist and MacArthur Genius-Award winner Aleksandar Hemon, and with dozens of editorial, media, and programming partners in the U.S., UK, and Europe, the Best European Fiction series will be a window onto what s happening right now in literary scenes throughout Europe, where the next Kafka, Flaubert, or Mann is waiting to be discovered. List of contributors Preface: Zadie Smith Introduction: Aleksandar Hemon Ornela Vorpsi (Albania): from The Country Where No One Ever Dies Antonio Fian (Austria): from While Sleeping Peter Terrin (Belgium: Dutch): from "The Murderer" Jean-Philippe Toussaint (Belgium: French): "Zidane's Melancholy" Igor Stiks (Bosnia): "At the Sarajevo Market" Georgi Gospodinov (Bulgaria): "And All Turned Moon" Neven Usumovic (Croatia): "Veres" Naja Marie Aidt (Denmark): "Bulbjerg" Elo Viiding (Estonia): "Foreign Women" Juhani Brander (Finland): from Extinction Christine Montalbetti (France): "Hotel Komaba Eminence" (with Haruki Murakami) George Konr d (Hungary): "Jeremiah's Terrible Tale" Steinar Bragi (Iceland): "The Sky Over Thingvellir" Julian Gough (Ireland: English): "The Orphan and the Mob" Ornan Choile in (Ireland: Irish): "Camino" Giulio Mozzi (AKA Carlo Dalcielo) (Italy): "Carlo Doesn't Know How to Read" Inga Abele (Latvia): "Ants and Bumblebees" Mathias Ospelt (Liechtenstein): "Deep In the Snow" Giedra Radvilaviciute? (Lithuania): "The Allure of the Text" Goce Smilevski (Macedonia): "Fourteen Little Gustavs" Stephan Enter (Netherlands): "Resistance" Jon Fosse (Norway): "Waves of Stone" Michal Witkowski (Poland): "Didi" Valter Hugo M e (Portugal): "dona malva and senhor jos ferreiro" Cosmin Manolache (Romania): "Three Hundred Cups" Victor Pelevin (Russia): "Friedmann Space" David Albahari (Serbia): "The Basilica

The Book of Other People

by Zadie Smith

A stellar host of writers explore the cornerstone of fiction writing: character The Book of Other People is about character. Twenty-five or so outstanding writers have been asked by Zadie Smith to make up a fictional character. By any measure, creating character is at the heart of the fictional enterprise, and this book concentrates on writers who share a talent for making something recognizably human out of words (and, in the case of the graphic novelists, pictures). But the purpose of the book is variety: straight "realism"-if such a thing exists-is not the point. There are as many ways to create character as there are writers, and this anthology features a rich assortment of exceptional examples. The writers featured in The Book of Other People include: Aleksandar Hemon Nick Hornby Hari Kunzru Toby Litt David Mitchell George Saunders Colm Tóibín Chris Ware, and more

Changing My Mind: Occasional Essays

by Zadie Smith

Split into five sections-Reading, Being, Seeing, Feeling, and Remembering--Changing My Mind finds Zadie Smith casting an acute eye over material both personal and cultural. This engaging collection of essays-some published here for the first time-reveals Smith as a passionate and precise essayist, equally at home in the world of great books and bad movies, family and philosophy, British comedians and Italian divas. Whether writing on Katherine Hepburn, Kafka, Anna Magnani, or Zora Neale Hurston, she brings deft care to the art of criticism with a style both sympathetic and insightful. Changing My Mind is journalism at its most expansive, intelligent, and funny-a gift to readers and writers both.

NW: A Novel

by Zadie Smith

North West London comes vividly to life in NW, the new novel by the author of the bestselling White Teeth and Man Booker-shortlisted On Beauty. This is the story of a city. The north-west corner of a city. Here you'll find guests and hosts, those with power and those without it, people who live somewhere special and others who live nowhere at all. And many people in between. Every city is like this. Cheek-by-jowl living. Separate worlds. And then there are the visitations: the rare times a stranger crosses a threshold without permission or warning, causing a disruption in the whole system. Like the April afternoon a woman came to Leah Hanwell's door, seeking help, disturbing the peace, forcing Leah out of her isolation . . . Zadie Smith's brilliant tragi-comic new novel follows four Londoners - Leah, Natalie, Felix and Nathan - as they try to make adult lives outside of Caldwell, the council estate of their childhood. From private houses to public parks, at work and at play, their London is a complicated place, as beautiful as it is brutal, where the thoroughfares hide the back alleys and taking the high road can sometimes lead you to a dead end. Depicting the modern urban zone - familiar to town-dwellers everywhere - Zadie Smith's NW is a quietly devastating novel of encounters, mercurial and vital, like the city itself. Praise for Zadie Smith: 'A tremendous talent' Boyd Tonkin, Independent'A writer of remarkable wit and originality' Observer'One of the handful of novelists writing at present who really matter and who, we may confidently assume, will "last". She is "canonical"' The Times'[It is] impossible not to admire Smith's marriage of humanity, humour and intellect' Irish Times 'An outstanding novelist with the powerful understanding both of what the brain knows and what love knows' ObserverZadie Smith was born in north-west London in 1975. She is the author of the novels White Teeth, The Autograph Man and On Beauty, which was shortlisted for the Booker Prize. She is also the author of a collection of essays, Changing My Mind, and the editor of The Book of Other People.

On Beauty

by Zadie Smith

Winner of the 2006 Orange Prize for fiction and from the celebrated author of White Teeth comes another bestselling masterwork Having hit bestseller lists from the New York Times to the San Francisco Chronicle, this wise, hilarious novel reminds us why Zadie Smith has rocketed to literary stardom. On Beauty is the story of an interracial family living in the university town of Wellington, Massachusetts, whose misadventures in the culture wars-on both sides of the Atlantic-serve to skewer everything from family life to political correctness to the combustive collision between the personal and the political. Full of dead-on wit and relentlessly funny, this tour de force confirms Zadie Smith's reputation as a major literary talent. Named one of the Ten Best Books of the Year by the New York Times Book Review, Entertainment Weekly, Time, and Publishers Weekly A New York Times, Wall Street Journal, USA Today, San Francisco Chronicle, Los Angeles Times, Boston Globe, Denver Post, and Publishers Weekly bestseller A Los Angeles Times, Boston Globe, Chicago Tribune, San Francisco Chronicle, Atlantic Monthly, Newsday, Christian Science Monitor, and Minneapolis Star Tribune Best Book of the Year Short-listed for the Man Booker Prize BACKCOVER: Praise for On Beauty: "A thoroughly original tale . . . wonderfully engaging, wonderfully observed . . . That rare thing: a novel that is as affecting as it is entertaining, as provocative as it is humane. " -Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times "A thing of beauty. Oh happy day when a writer as gifted as Zadie Smith fulfills her early promise with a novel as accomplished, substantive and penetrating as On Beauty. " -Los Angeles Times "Smith's specialty is her ability to render the new world, in its vibrant multiculturalism, with a kind of dancing, daring joy. . . . Her plots and people sing with life. . . . One of the best of the year, a splendid treat. " -Chicago Tribune "Short-listed for [the 2005] Man Booker Prize, On Beauty is a rollicking satire . . . a tremendously good read. " -San Francisco Chronicle .

On Beauty: A Novel

by Zadie Smith

A look at family life, marriage, the collision of the personal and political, and an honest look at people's self-deceptions.

The Story About the Story Vol. II

by Margaret Atwood Charles Baxter Martin Amis Zadie Smith David Foster Wallace J. C. Hallman

In the second volume of The Story About the Story, editor J. C. Hallman continues to argue for an alternative to the staid five-paragraph-essay writing that has inoculated so many against the effects of good books. Writers have long approached writing about reading from an intensely personal perspective, incorporating their pasts and their passions into their process of interpretation. Never before collected in a single volume, the many essays Hallman has compiled build on the idea of a "creative criticism," and new possibilities for how to write about reading.The Story About the Story Vol. II documents not only an identifiable trend in writing about books that can and should be emulated, it also offers lessons from a remarkable range of celebrated authors that amount to an invaluable course on both how to write and how to read well. Whether they discuss a staple of the canon (Thomas Mann on Leo Tolstoy), the merits of a contemporary (Vivian Gornick on Grace Paley), a pillar of genre-writing (Jane Tompkins on Louis L'Amour), or, arguably, the funniest man on the planet (David Shields on Bill Murray), these essays are by turns poignant, smart, suggestive, intellectual, humorous, sassy, scathing, laudatory, wistful, and hopeful-and above all deeply engaged in a process of careful reading. The essays in The Story About the Story Vol. II chart a trajectory that digs deep into the past and aims toward a future in which literature can play a new and more profound role in how we think, read, live, and write.

White Teeth

by Zadie Smith

Zadie Smith's dazzling debut caught critics grasping for comparisons and deciding on everyone from Charles Dickens to Salman Rushdie to John Irving and Martin Amis. But the truth is that Zadie Smith's voice is remarkably, fluently, and altogether wonderfully her own.At the center of this invigorating novel are two unlikely friends, Archie Jones and Samad Iqbal. Hapless veterans of World War II, Archie and Samad and their families become agents of England's irrevocable transformation. A second marriage to Clara Bowden, a beautiful, albeit tooth-challenged, Jamaican half his age, quite literally gives Archie a second lease on life, and produces Irie, a knowing child whose personality doesn't quite match her name (Jamaican for "no problem"). Samad's late-in-life arranged marriage (he had to wait for his bride to be born), produces twin sons whose separate paths confound Iqbal's every effort to direct them, and a renewed, if selective, submission to his Islamic faith. Set against London's racial and cultural tapestry, venturing across the former empire and into the past as it barrels toward the future, White Teeth revels in the ecstatic hodgepodge of modern life, flirting with disaster, confounding expectations, and embracing the comedy of daily existence.From the Trade Paperback edition.

Showing 1 through 11 of 11 results

Help

Select your format based upon: 1) how you want to read your book, and 2) compatibility with your reading tool. To learn more about using Bookshare with your device, visit the "Using Bookshare" page in the Help Center.

Here is an overview of the specialized formats that Bookshare offers its members with links that go to the Help Center for more information.

  • Bookshare Web Reader - a customized reading tool for Bookshare members offering all the features of DAISY with a single click of the "Read Now" link.
  • DAISY (Digital Accessible Information System) - a digital book file format. DAISY books from Bookshare are DAISY 3.0 text files that work with just about every type of access technology that reads text. Books that contain images will have the download option of ‘DAISY Text with Images’.
  • BRF (Braille Refreshable Format) - digital Braille for use with refreshable Braille devices and Braille embossers.
  • MP3 (Mpeg audio layer 3) - Provides audio only with no text. These books are created with a text-to-speech engine and spoken by Kendra, a high quality synthetic voice from Ivona. Any device that supports MP3 playback is compatible.
  • DAISY Audio - Similar to the Daisy 3.0 option above; however, this option uses MP3 files created with our text-to-speech engine that utilizes Ivona's Kendra voice. This format will work with Daisy Audio compatible players such as Victor Reader Stream and Read2Go.