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1500 Chinese Design Motifs

by Pan Wuhua

These crisp, black-and-white images will lend a distinctive Far Eastern accent to any project. Hundreds of eye-catching images include geometrics, abstracts, optical illusions, plus other intriguing configurations that adapt easily for use as spot illustrations or as repeating patterns. Professional and amateur artists, illustrators, and designers will find this inexpensive treasury a priceless source of royalty-free inspiration.

160 Years of Samford University: For God, For Learning, Forever

by Sean Flynt

Samford University, established in 1841 as Howard College, is a treasured institution of higher learning in Alabama, consistently ranked among the best regional universities in the nation. Well known for the quality of education it offers and for its stunning Georgian-Colonial campus, Samford boasts a long and fascinating history, illuminated here in acollection of vintage photographs. With images ranging from informal to formal, routine to remarkable, tragic to hilarious, this engaging retrospective delves into the heart of the school's heritage--its people. The aspirations of all who have called Samford home and those who have supported its mission come to life in snapshot memories of centuries past. Highlights of the book include extensive coverage of the East Lake campus years; the first experiment in coeducation; the earliest known photographs of the Marion campus;the infamous "liberation" of a rival college's mascot; the courage of student journalists in the 1970s; the story of Harry, the slave who gave his life saving students; and Samford University's latest educational innovations and architectural marvels. Rarely seen photographs from the university's Special Collection department, supplemented by informative, entertaining captions, offer Samford students, faculty, staff, alumni, and friends a chance to relive some of the most memorable moments in the school's history.

180° South

by Jeff Johnson Yvon Chouinard Doug Tompkins Chris Malloy

180° South takes readers behind the scenes of the film, 180° South, made by Chris Malloy, to learn more about the people who made the original overland journey to Patagonia in 1968, and the repeat journey over ocean and land 40 years later. The book includes stories of events and experiences that inspired Chris Malloy, Yvon Chouinard, and Doug Tompkins to choose paths committed to saving what's left of the wild world. Open it anywhere and enjoy the photographs by the world's leading surf and climbing photographers Jeff Johnson, Jimmy Chin, Scotty Soen, and Danny Moder.

1911 The First 100 Years

by Patrick Sweeney

In 1911, the history of firearms changed forever with the adoption of the greatest pistol ever designed, the Automatic Pistol, Caliber .45, M1911--known today simply as the 1911. Now, in one fascinating, illustrated volume, authority Patrick Sweeney celebrates the 100th anniversary of the greatest fighting handgun ever designed, John M. Brownings legendary 1911 .45. From the predecessors of the 1911 and its contemporaries to the best of today's semi- and full-custom models, you'll find it in 1911: The First 100 Years. Lavishly illustrated with photographs collected from around the world, 1911: The First 100 Years is a fitting centennial tribute to a pistol that is today more popular than ever. For the collector, for the shooter, for the historian--for anyone interested in big-bore handguns or the evolution of this truly American classic, this is a must-have volume.

1911 The First 100 Years

by Patrick Sweeney

In 1911, the history of firearms changed forever with the adoption of the greatest pistol ever designed, the Automatic Pistol, Caliber . 45, M1911 - known today simply as the 1911. Now, in one fascinating, illustrated volume, authority Patrick Sweeney celebrates the 100th anniversary of the greatest fighting handgun ever designed, John M. Brownings legendary 1911 . 45. From the predecessors of the 1911 and its contemporaries to the best of today's semi- and -full-custom models, you'll find it in 1911: The First 100 Years. Lavishly illustrated with photographs collected from around the world, 1911: The First 100 Years is a fitting centennial tribute to a pistol that is today more popular than ever. For the collector, for the shooter, for the historian - for anyone interested in big-bore handguns or the evolution of this truly American classic, this is a must-have volume.

The 1912 and 1915 Gustav Stickley Craftsman Furniture Catalogs

by Gustav Stickley

With over 200 detailed illustrations and descriptions, these two catalogs are essential reading and reference materials and identification guides for Stickley furniture. Among the items depicted and described are chairs, rockers, stools, settles, desks, library tables, music cabinets, drop-leaf tables, nests of tables, chests of drawers, sideboards, china cabinets and dressing tables.

1913

by Shaun Whiteside Florian Illies Jamie Lee Searle

Just before one of its darkest moments came the twentieth century's most exciting year . . .It was the year Henry Ford first put a conveyer belt in his car factory, and the year Louis Armstrong first picked up a trumpet. It was the year Charlie Chaplin signed his first movie contract, and Coco Chanel and Prada opened their first dress shops. It was the year Proust began his opus, Stravinsky wrote The Rite of Spring, and the first Armory Show in New York introduced the world to Picasso and the world of abstract art. It was the year the recreational drug now known as ecstasy was invented.It was 1913, the year before the world plunged into the catastrophic darkness of World War I.In a witty yet moving narrative that progresses month by month through the year, and is interspersed with numerous photos and documentary artifacts (such as Kafka's love letters), Florian Illies ignores the conventions of the stodgy tome so common in "one year" histories. Forefronting cultural matters as much as politics, he delivers a charming and riveting tale of a world full of hope and unlimited possibility, peopled with amazing characters and radical politics, bristling with new art and new technology . . . even as ominous storm clouds began to gather.From the Hardcover edition.

1914 - Goodbye to All That

by Jeanette Winterson Colm Toibin Elif Shafak Erwin Mortier Lawinia Greenlaw

In this collection of essays, ten leading writers from different countries consider the conflicts that have informed their own literary lives. 1914-Goodbye to All That borrows its title from Robert Graves's "bitter leave-taking of England" in which he writes not only of the First World War but the questions it raised: how to live, how to live with each other, and how to write. Interpreting this title as broadly and ambiguously as Graves intended, these essays mark the War's centenary by reinvigorating these questions. The book includes Elif Shafak on an inheritance of silence in Turkey, Ali Smith on lost voices in Scotland, Xiaolu Guo on the 100,000 Chinese sent to the Front, Daniel Kehlmann on hypnotism in Berlin, Colm Toibin on Lady Gregory losing her son fighting for Britain as she fought for an independent Ireland, Kamila Shamsie on reimagining Karachi, Erwin Mortier on occupied Belgium's legacy of shame, NoViolet Bulawayo on Zimbabwe and clarity, Ales Steger on resisting history in Slovenia, and Jeanette Winterson on what art is for. Contributors include: Ali Smith - Scotland Ales Steger - Slovenia Jeanette Winterson - England Elif Shafak - Turkey NoViolet Bulawayo - Zimbabwe Colm Toíbín - Ireland Xiaolu Guo - China Erwin Mortier - Belgium Kamila Shamsie - Pakistan Daniel Kehlmann - GermanyFrom the Trade Paperback edition.

1920s Fashions from B. Altman & Company

by Altman Co.

Over 700 black-and-white illustrations, detailed descriptions, and prices for a vast array of upscale women's clothing and accessories appear among these highlights from rare 1920s B. Altman & Company catalogs. Stylized drawings of flappers depict sophisticated dresses, bathing suits, cloche hats, shoes, and more. A selection of attire for men and children is included.

The 1924 Tornado in Lorain & Sandusky: Deadliest in Ohio History

by Betsy D'Annibale

June 28, 1924, dawned hot and sunny, with fluffy white clouds hovering over a blue and inviting Lake Erie. For two Ohio communities, Lorain and Sandusky, the day ended in unimaginable disaster. In the late afternoon, the blue sky turned dark, and the wispy white puffs morphed into a mass of black thunderclouds as a monster formed on the lake. An F4 tornado, unexpected and not understood, was born from a thunderstorm on the now turbulent waters of Lake Erie. It charged ashore, smashing into Sandusky, retreated again to the lake and then headed east before turning abruptly south to make landfall in Lorain. Before the massive funnel lifted, it would destroy a city, create death records still unbroken and change the lives of thousands of people.

The 1931 Hastings Bank Job & the Bloody Bandit Trail

by Monty Mccord

In February 1931, "Mr. & Mrs. Robert Hendricks" and three others tied up fourteen employees at the Hastings National Bank and walked away with over $27,000 from the vault. They then returned home to plan a robbery of the First National Bank for the following day. Even though police quickly surrounded the house, the robbers managed to capture all eleven officers on the scene and make a getaway. Retired police lieutenant and historian Monty McCord recounts the crime and the grisly aftermath in the first account of the heist ever to be published.

1939-1940 New York World's Fair, The

by Bill Cotter

After enduring 10 harrowing years of the Great Depression, visitors to the 1939-1940 New York World's Fair found welcome relief in the fair's optimistic presentation of the "World of Tomorrow." Pavilions from America's largest corporations and dozens of countries were spread across a 1,216-acre site, showcasing the latest industrial marvels and predictions for the future intermingled with cultural displays from around the world. Well known for its theme structures, the Trylon and Perisphere, the fair was an intriguing mixture of technology, science, architecture, showmanship, and politics. Proclaimed by many as the most memorable world's fair ever held, it predicted wonderful times were ahead for the world even as the clouds of war were gathering. Through vintage photographs, most never published before, The 1939-1940 New York World's Fair recaptures those days when the eyes of the world were on New York and on the future.

The 1950s American Home

by Diane Boucher

This title explores what life was like in the 1950s American home. An age of optimism, it is about living the American Dream and how this was achieved, changes in the home, new convenience technology, new ways of living. From Ranch House to American Modernism to affordable homes in the suburbs, this was how to live the good life in an era of unprecedented prosperity and opportunity.From the Trade Paperback edition.

The 1950s Kitchen

by Kathryn Ferry

The 1950s was the first great age of the modern kitchen: labor-saving appliances, bright colors and the novelty of fitted units moved the kitchen from dankness into light, where it became the domain of the happy housewife and the heart of the home. Formica - a new space-age material - decorated with fashionable patterns topped sleek cupboards that contained new classic wares such as Pyrex and 'Homemaker' crockery, and the ingredients for 1950s British staples: semolina, coronation chicken and spotted dick. Electricity entered the kitchens of millions, and nowhere in the home was modern technology and modern design more evident. Bold color, clean lines and stainless steel were keynotes of the decade, and it is no surprise that 1950s kitchen style is now the height of fashion once again, with names like Cath Kidston picking up on the best of '50s kitchen kitsch, and manufacturers like Dualit, Kitchen Aid and Aga doing healthy business with retro appliances. This book - a celebration of cooking, eating and living in the 1950s kitchen - is a feast of nostalgia, and a mine of inspiration for anyone wanting to recreate that '50s look in their own home.From the Trade Paperback edition.

The 1959 Yellowstone Earthquake

by Lee Whittlesey Larry Morris

At 11:37 p.m. on August 17, 1959, a magnitude 7.5 earthquake rocked Montana's Yellowstone country. In an instant, an entire mountainside fractured and thundered down onto the sites of unsuspecting campers. The mammoth avalanche generated hurricane-force winds ahead of it that ripped clothing from backs and heaved tidal waves in both directions of the Madison River Canyon. More than two hundred vacationers trapped in the canyon feared the dam upstream would burst. As debris and flooding overwhelmed the river, injured victims frantically searched the darkness for friends and family. Acclaimed historian Larry Morris tells the gripping minute-by-minute saga of the survivors who endured the interminable night, the first responders who risked their lives and the families who waited days and weeks for word of their missing loved ones.

The 1960s Home

by Paul Evans

The 1960s witnessed a sustained period of economic growth, consumer spending and stable employment. This hitherto unknown prosperity enabled a market growth in levels of owner occupation and a subsequent boom in the sale of household furnishings and luxury goods. The 1960s Home looks at the styles and fashions in domestic housing and interiors between 1960 and 1970. Although this period has received increasing attention in recent years, much of it has been concentrated on progressive and exclusive design rather than on the furniture and furnishing of the 'average' home.From the Trade Paperback edition.

1963: The Year of the Revolution

by Ariel Leve

1963It was the year that Cold War protagonists sought a truce, the race to space stepped up a gear, feminism and civil rights flexed their political muscles, and President John F. Kennedy's assassination numbed the world. But as the front pages of history were being printed, the scoop of the century slipped by unnoticed. On January 13, 1963, two then-largely unknown musical acts made their first appearances on nationwide television in Britain. Neither the Beatles nor Bob Dylan could have known it at the time, but through some strange alchemy the anthems of social upheaval were being heard by a mass audience--and these artists were the catalyst. Within the year, their voices were captivating millions of ears around the world. The Beatles had become the poster boys of a revolution that still influences us to this day, and Dylan its prophet. In short, 1963 saw the birth of a global demographic power shift. Within that one year, youth, for the first time in history, had become a commercial and cultural force that commanded the attention of government and religion and exercised the power to shape society. 1963: The Year of the Revolution is the first book to recount the kinetic story of the liberation of youth through music, fashion, and the arts--and in the voices of those who changed the world so radically, from Keith Richards to Eric Clapton, Mary Quant to Vidal Sassoon, Graham Nash to Peter Frampton, Alan Parker to Gay Talese, Stevie Nicks to Norma Kamali, and many more. It is an oral history that records, documentary-style, the incredible roller-coaster ride of that year, in which a group of otherwise obscure teenagers would become global superstars. It serves not only as a fast-paced, historical eyewitness account but as an inspiration to anyone in search of a passion, an identity, and a dream.

1964-1965 New York World's Fair, The

by Bill Cotter Bill Young

Advertised as the "Billion-Dollar Fair," the 1964-1965 New York World's Fair transformed a sleepy park in the borough of Queens into a fantasy world enjoyed by more than 51 million visitors from around the world. While many countries and states exhibited at the fair, the most memorable pavilions were built by the giants of American industry. Their exhibits took guests backward and forward in time, all the while extolling how marvelous everyday life would be through the use of their products. Many of the techniques used in these shows set the standard for future fairs and theme parks, and the pavilions that housed them remain the most elaborate structures ever built for an American fair. The 1964-1965 New York World's Fair showcases the beauty of this international spectacular through rare color photographs, published here for the first time.

1964-1965 New York World's Fair, The

by Bill Cotter Bill Young

The 1964-1965 New York World's Fair was the largest international exhibition ever built in the United States. More than one hundred fifty pavilions and exhibits spread over six hundred forty-six acres helped the fair live up to its reputation as "the Billion-Dollar Fair." With the cold war in full swing, the fair offered visitors a refreshingly positive view of the future, mirroring the official theme: Peace through Understanding. Guests could travel back in time through a display of full-sized dinosaurs, or look into a future where underwater hotels and flying cars were commonplace. They could enjoy Walt Disney's popular shows, or study actual spacecraft flown in orbit. More than fifty-one million guests visited the fair before it closed forever in 1965. The 1964-1965 New York World's Fair captures the history of this event through vintage photographs, published here for the first time.

1964-1965 New York World's Fair, The: Creation and Legacy

by Bill Cotter Bill Young

When the gates of the 1964-1965 New York World's Fair swung open on April 24, 1964, the first of more than 51 million lucky visitors entered, ready to witness the cutting edge of worldwide technology and progress. Faced with a disappointing lack of foreign participants due to political contention, the fair instead showcased the best of American industry and science. While multimillion-dollar pavilions predicted colonies on the moon and hotels under the ocean, other forecasts, such as the promises of computer technology, have surpassed even the most optimistic predictions of the fair. The 1964-1965 New York World's Fair: Creation and Legacy uses rare, previously unpublished photographs to examine the creation of the fair and the legacies left behind for future generations.

1964 Flood of Humboldt and Del Norte, The

by Greg Rumney Dave Stockton Jr.

The 1964 flood in the Eel and Klamath Rivers drainages represents an extreme weather event. Both the Northern California and Southern Oregon coasts are host to many floods, but the 1964 flood stands out as a representation of the "perfect storm." Three events occurred that led to the flood. First, a cold front moved in and dropped several feet of snow. Second, a warm front called the "pineapple connection" moved in and released lots of rain while melting the snowfall--local measurements varied from 20 to 32 inches of rainwater in three days. And third, the highest tide of the year had backed up debris and water for several miles. At its peak, the Eel River was discharging more than 800,000 cubic feet per second. Another contributing factor was that besides being one of the fastest rising and falling rivers in the world, the Eel River has the heaviest sediment load second only to the Yellow River in China.

1967 Red Sox: The Impossible Dream Season

by Raymond Sinibaldi Billy Rohr

The Impossible Dream became a fitting moniker for the Boston Red Sox season of 1967, a summer that still evokes memories of a time that united a city and transformed a franchise. Led by 1967 MVP Carl Yastrzemski and Boston's first Cy Young Award winner, Jim Lonborg, the youngest Red Sox team since the days of Babe Ruth went from ninth to first place in what remains the closest pennant race in baseball history. Tony Conigliaro, Rico Petrocelli, George Scott, Reggie Smith, Billy Rohr, Jerry Adair, and their teammates became household names to the Fenway Faithful as they carried the Red Sox to their first World Series in 21 years under manager Dick Williams.

The 1975 Portland Timbers: The Birth of Soccer City, USA

by Michael Orr

Relive the magic of the Portland Timbers' 1975 season and the birth of Soccer City, USA. This is the story of seventeen players and two coaches who came from different clubs and different countries to form a team just days before their inaugural game. In this fast-paced account, Michael Orr weaves together player interviews, news coverage, and game statistics to capture the Timbers' single-season journey from expansion team to championship contender. From the first televised game against Pele's New York Cosmos to the seven-game winning streak that vied for a league record and the post-season battle for the game's highest prize, rediscover how, in just four months, the Timbers won the hearts of Portlanders and left an indelible stamp on the Rose City's sporting landscape.

1975 Red Sox: American League Champions

by Raymond Sinibaldi Fred Lynn

The 1975 American League Champion Boston Red Sox squared off with the Cincinnati Reds in what is widely recognized as one of the best World Series ever played. The Major League Baseball Network has named its sixth game "the greatest game ever played." The Red Sox were led by two rookies, 21-year-old Jim Rice and 22-year-old Fred Lynn, who formed a rookie duo the likes of which baseball had never seen. They combined with a budding superstar in Carlton Fisk and his aging counterpart Carl Yastrzemski to lead the Red Sox attack, while a wily Luis Tiant anchored the pitching staff. After a first-round sweep of the three-time World Champion Oakland A's, they advanced to a Fall Classic that echoes through the ages, and in the words of Carlton Fisk, the Red Sox won "three games to four.

1984 New Orleans World's Fair, The

by Bill Cotter

In 1984, the city of New Orleans hosted the last world's fair held in the United States. Conceived as part of an ambitious effort to revitalize a dilapidated section of the city and establish New Orleans as a year-round tourist destination, it took more than 12 years of political intrigue and design changes before the gates finally opened. Stretching 84 acres along the Mississippi River, the fair entertained more than seven million guests with a colorful collection of pavilions, rides, and restaurants during its six-month run. While most world's fairs lose money, the 1984 New Orleans World's Fair had the dubious distinction of going bankrupt and almost closing early. However, the $350-million investment did succeed in bringing new life to the area, which is now home to the city's convention center and a bustling arts district.

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