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The 23rd Psalm: A Holocaust Memoir

by George Lucius Salton Anna Salton Eisen

After a half century, the author who now lives in Florida returned to his hometown in Poland to find that "... the wall that I have carefully built between the past and present has crumbled..." Salton (nee: Saltzman) relates surviving ten concentration camps as an adolescent and liberation by American soldiers, including Jewish ones to his astonishment.

24 Karat Etiquette

by Lisa Gache

In Beverly Hills, fame and wealth can buy everything--except class, grace, and sophistication. In 24 Karat Etiquette, Lisa Gaché offers a behind-the-scenes look at Beverly Hills residents' unique social dilemmas through the eyes of an etiquette expert, tasked with transforming her awkward, boorish, and sometimes challenging clients into social virtuosos. Not only does Lisa rule the roost at her in-town manners school, but her services are also in demand across the globe. From Saudi princesses to Oscar winners, talent agents to intelligence operatives, child actresses, butlers, and football players, Lisa has amassed an astounding roster over the years.In today's technological world, Lisa counsels clients on more than their table manners. Thanks to the explosion of social media, netiquette is a vital new discipline. If a tweet hits the fan, it doesn't matter if you're a "nobody" or a "somebody"; repercussions are real and sometimes devastating.Everyone, regardless of their proximity to the Hollywood stars, can pick up something to apply to their own lives through the stories Lisa shares about her experiences with her most amusing, clueless, and stubborn clients. The inquiries never cease to amaze her.Teaching an Oscar nominee how to successfully navigate the red carpetInstructing sixty sorority girls how to use a fork and knife properlyTutoring a child actress requiring formal instruction on interacting with "normal" peopleCounseling an overnight rags-to-riches success story without a clue how to fit inTraining soldiers specializing in interrogation how to assimilate back to their home lives

25 to Life

by J. A. Federice

Biography of Terri, a young woman with a rare neurological condition that caused her to lose muscle control over time. The book is written by Terri's mother and follows Terri through childhood and on into her twenties.

3000 Degrees: The True Story of a Deadly Fire and the Men Who Fought It

by Sean Flynn

On December 3, 1999, the call came in to the men of the Worcester, Massachusetts, Fire Department: a five-alarm blaze in a six-story, abandoned, windlowless warehouse filled with lethal hallways and meat lockers. Once inside, they found themselves trapped in a snarling furnace as hot as a crematorium, with smoke so black and predatory they had to feel for their partners next to them. Swallowed deep inside the building, with no way out, they trusted their mates to do their jobs, valiantly struggling to survive an ill-fated ordeal that would push them to the very limits of loyalty and courage. 3000 DEGREES is the gripping account of heroic men whose job it is to rush into burning buildings-when everyone else just wants out.

32 Third Graders And One Class Bunny: Life Lessons From Teaching

by Phillip Done

A funny and intimate book about what really goes on at school.

33 Men

by Jonathan Franklin

Award-winning journalist Jonathan Franklin chronicles the harrowing account of the 33 Chilean miners who were trapped underground for fourteen weeks in the fall of 2010. Franklin, with his renowned eye for detail and dialogue, captures the remarkable story of these men to reveal to the world how they used their native talents to survive against all odds in a savage environment.

41 : A Portrait of My Father

by George W. Bush

George W. Bush, the 43rd President of the United States, has authored a personal biography of his father, George H. W. Bush, the 41st President. <P> Forty-three men have served as President of the United States. Countless books have been written about them. But never before has a President told the story of his father, another President, through his own eyes and in his own words. A unique and intimate biography, the book covers the entire scope of the elder President Bush's life and career, including his service in the Pacific during World War II, his pioneering work in the Texas oil business, and his political rise as a Congressman, U.S. Representative to China and the United Nations, CIA Director, Vice President, and President. The book shines new light on both the accomplished statesman and the warm, decent man known best by his family. In addition, George W. Bush discusses his father's influence on him throughout his own life, from his childhood in West Texas to his early campaign trips with his father, and from his decision to go into politics to his own two-term Presidency.

44, Dublin Made Me: A Memoir

by Peter Sheridan

Young Peter has a hilarious yet tender masculine perspective. You'll wish he had been your best friend or big brother. In recalling his childhood in Dublin from 1959 through 1970 Peter Sheridan shows his worthiness in carrying on the Irish traditional mastery of storytelling. At age 8 he proudly pedals his bike through Dublin streets on his Da's errands and willingly risks his life to help install the antenna for the family's first TV. Sheridan describes his parents' struggles with a new-fangled, epileptic, washing machine like he's announcing a prize fight. Though his boyhood classroom is an ocean and away and 45 years ago you'll laugh and cringe in recognition. You'll watch a children's Gaelic football game that is shockingly all tragedy and no sport. When Peter reaches his teens, you'll experience his first exposure to the Beatles, his first awkward dates, first rebellion against Da, first band, first realization of his Ma's wisdom and sacrifice for the family, and his discovery of the joys of live theater. Through tragedy and loss of innocence, a sensitive, creative, kind young boy grows in to a man with his compassion, humor and love of family in tact. Author uses a dash before quoted words to indicate quotes in dialogue instead of quotation marks or apostrophies. Adult language is occasionally used in dialogue.

47 Roses: A Story of Family Secrets and Enduring Love

by Peter Sheridan

A family secret, a sacrifice for love, a dying mother, a search for the truth: the ingredients of 47 Roses suggest a compelling novel. But for Peter Sheridan, these are not the elements of fiction-they are the ingredients of his own life. In 47 Roses, Sheridan tells the moving and sometimes shocking story of "the other woman" in his parents' lives. Upon his father's sudden death in Dublin, Sheridan finds out about his father's almost fifty-year relationship with Doris, an Englishwoman who was both less and far more than a mistress. Sheridan elegantly describes his search for the truth in the face of resistance from his mother, who falls fatally ill. He eventually meets Doris and learns that she never married, living only for her brief meetings with Sheridan's father. This beautifully written portrait of a marriage forces us, like Sheridan himself, to face truths of the heart that refuse to conform to the easy verities of convention.

50 Jobs in 50 States

by Daniel Seddiqui

Like lots of college grads, Daniel Seddiqui was having a hard time finding a job. But despite more than forty rejections, he knew opportunities had to exist. So he set out on an extraordinary quest: fifty jobs in fifty states in fifty weeks. And not just any jobs--he chose professions that reflected the culture and economy of each state. Working as everything from a cheesemaker in Wisconsin, a border patrol agent in Arizona, and a meatpacker in Kansas to a lobsterman in Maine, a surfing instructor in Hawaii, and a football coach in Alabama, Daniel chronicles how he adapted to the wildly differing people, cultures, and environments. From one week to the next he had no idea exactly what his duties would be, where he'd be sleeping, what he'd be eating, or how he'd be received. He became a roving news item, appearing on CNN, Fox News, World News Tonight, MSNBC, and the Today show--which was good preparation for his stint as a television weatherman. Tackling challenge after challenge--overcoming anxiety about working four miles underground in a West Virginia coal mine, learning to walk on six-foot stilts (in a full Egyptian king costume) at a Florida amusement park, racing the clock as a pit-crew member at an Indiana racetrack--Daniel completed his journey a changed man. In this book he shares stories about the people he met, reveals the lessons he learned, and explains the five principles that kept him going.

57 Short Stories of Saints

by Anne Eileen Heffernan

Some of the best-loved saints of the Church are featured in a revised and updated edition of a classic collection. Wonderfully written biographies and illustrations of Saints Lucy, Monica, Augustine, Benedict, Francis Xavier, Edith Stein, Juan Diego, Katharine Drexel, and many others. Perfect for intermediate readers and school or church libraries.

700 Sundays

by Billy Crystal

Actor and comedian Billy Crystal has forged a highly successful career by portraying other people in movies like When Harry Met Sally...and City Slickers. But in 700 Sundays, a memoir based on his one-man Broadway play of the same name, Crystal tells his own story, dissecting an often complex relationship with his father and how that relationship resonated in other aspects of his life. His father, Jack Crystal was an influential jazz concert promoter and operated an influential jazz record label, affording his son an opportunity to tell stories of being taken to his first movie by Billie Holliday and seeing his grandmother suggest that Louis Armstrong simply "try coughing it up." But Jack died when his son was fifteen years old, soon after a forever-unresolved argument between the two, leaving Billy to cope with crushing grief while simultaneously and perhaps ironically trying to launch a career in comedy. This lends 700 Sundays much needed gravity in a volume that is packed with zingy one-liners and whimsical observations that serve to illustrate the comedy career Crystal forged, while also providing some decent laughs. Interestingly, there is very little reference to the better known accomplishments of Crystal's Hollywood career as the author chooses to focus instead on the seemingly mundane but highly entertaining aspects of his Long Island roots. Though 700 Sundays (the name comes from Crystal's estimation of how many Sundays he got to spend with his father) is packaged here in book form, it reads like a piece of theater and, more specifically, like a selection of memories about a father, lovingly and touchingly re-told by his loving son. --John Moe

703: How I Lost More Than a Quarter Ton and Gained a Life

by Nancy Makin

A moving, funny, tongue-in-cheek, and deadly serious story about how one woman lost and found herself by going online. Nancy Makin weighed an astounding 703 pounds in May 2000. She was forty-five years old and had diabetes and heart disease. Thanks in equal parts to shame and logistics, she'd been homebound for a dozen years. But all that changed after a gift from her sister: a computer. A technophobe, Nancy ignored it for months, until finally boredom and curiosity pushed her into cyberspace. And there, in a chat room, she found the friendliness, the support, and even the love she'd been missing for so long. Nobody flinched when Nancy spoke up; people treated her with the same respect accorded to everybody else. Thanks to these emotional connections, Nancy's life was transformed. She followed no diet plan; no pills, potions or ab-crunching exercises played a part. There was no silver bullet, no magical, elusive ingredient-and yet today Nancy has lost more than 530 pounds. Nancy's tale is one of redemption, a story of reevaluating her worth and insisting she had value simply because she was human. It will show a growing America that life is sweet and always worth living.

740 Park: The Story of the World's Richest Apartment Building

by Michael Gross

For seventy-five years, it's been Manhattan's richest apartment building, and one of the most lusted-after addresses in the world. One apartment had 37 rooms, 14 bathrooms, 43 closets, 11 working fireplaces, a private elevator, and his-and-hers saunas; another at one time had a live-in service staff of 16. To this day, it is steeped in the purest luxury, the kind most of us could only imagine, until now. <P><P> The last great building to go up along New York's Gold Coast, construction on 740 Park finished in 1930. Since then, 740 has been home to an ever-evolving cadre of our wealthiest and most powerful families, some of America's (and the world's) oldest money--the kind attached to names like Vanderbilt, Rockefeller, Bouvier, Chrysler, Niarchos, Houghton, and Harkness--and some whose names evoke the excesses of today's monied elite: Kravis, Koch, Bronfman, Perelman, Steinberg, and Schwarzman. All along, the building has housed titans of industry, political power brokers, international royalty, fabulous scam-artists, and even the lowest scoundrels.<P> The book begins with the tumultuous story of the building's construction. Conceived in the bubbling financial, artistic, and social cauldron of 1920's Manhattan, 740 Park rose to its dizzying heights as the stock market plunged in 1929--the building was in dire financial straits before the first apartments were sold. The builders include the architectural genius Rosario Candela, the scheming businessman James T. Lee (Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis's grandfather), and a raft of financiers, many of whom were little more than white-collar crooks and grand-scale hustlers. <P> Once finished, 740 became a magnet for the richest, oldest families in the country: the Brewsters, descendents of the leader of the Plymouth Colony; the socially-registered Bordens, Hoppins, Scovilles, Thornes, and Schermerhorns; and top executives of the Chase Bank, American Express, and U.S. Rubber. Outside the walls of 740 Park, these were the people shaping America culturally and economically. Within those walls, they were indulging in all of the Seven Deadly Sins. <P> As the social climate evolved throughout the last century, so did 740 Park: after World War II, the building's rulers eased their more restrictive policies and began allowing Jews (though not to this day African Americans) to reside within their hallowed walls. Nowadays, it is full to bursting with new money, people whose fortunes, though freshly-made, are large enough to buy their way in. <P> At its core this book is a social history of the American rich, and how the locus of power and influence has shifted haltingly from old bloodlines to new money. But it's also much more than that: filled with meaty, startling, often tragic stories of the people who lived behind 740's walls, the book gives us an unprecedented access to worlds of wealth, privilege, and extraordinary folly that are usually hidden behind a scrim of money and influence. This is, truly, how the other half--or at least the other one hundredth of one percent--lives.

747: Creating the World's First Jumbo Jet and Other Adventures from a Life in Aviation

by Jay Spenser Joe Sutter

This is the thrilling story behind "the Queen of the Skies"--the Boeing 747--as told by Joe Sutter, one of the most celebrated engineers of the twentieth century, who spearheaded its design and construction. Born in 1921 in Seattle, Sutter grew up on a hilltop overlooking the Boeing plant and flying field. It was a thrilling era of open cockpits, silk scarves, leather helmets, and goggles. After serving in World War 2, Sutter joined Boeing, then a small company, eager to build airplanes. In July 1965, he was asked to lead the large Boeing team designing the new 747. Pan Am wanted a new airliner as quickly as possible. This all-new transport had to be far bigger than anything in service or even on anybody's drawing board. To make it fly, Sutter and his team would have to push far beyond the technological boundaries of the late 1960s. Could it be done? Almost everything about the 747 would be unprecedented. Its cabin would be so wide that it would need two aisles. Its horizontal tail would be bigger than the wings of most airliners ever built. Jet engines big enough to lift it off the ground didn't yet exist. Runways at the world's airports couldn't handle it, and neither could Boeing's factories. They had to erect the world's largest building just to produce it. A truly mammoth undertaking, the 747 became one of the most successful airplane models ever. Sutter's vivid narrative takes us back to a time when American technology was cutting-edge--the 747, came on the market the same year that men first set foot on the moon--and jet travel was still glamorous and new. With wit and warmth, he gives an insider's sense of the larger-than-life-size personalities and the tensions in the aeronautical world. Ultimately, 747 is an inspiring story of grit and glory.

84 Charing Cross Road

by Helene Hanff

this is a touching correspondence between Helene Hanff and the employees at a book shop on Charing Cross Road in London. It spans many years. Short but satisfying, this little book will warm your heart.

9-1/2 Years Behind the Green Door, a Memoir: A Mitchell Brothers Stripper Remembers Her Lover Artie Mitchell, Hunter S. Thompson, and the Killing that Rocked San Francisco

by Simone Corday

Before the advent of AIDS, the theater and its steamy live shows are a countercultural venue for celebrities in entertainment and sports, and for San Francisco politicians and journalists. Simone Corday, who danced at the O'Farrell and was a girlfriend of the late Artie Mitchell, shares her unique story and her insights. As the only woman insider, she writes about this insular when she was close to the impulsive Mitchells, and a friend of the O'Farrell's honorary Night Manager, Hunter Thompson.

900 Miles from Nowhere: Voices from the Homestead Frontier

by Steven R. Kinsella

It was on the vast American prairie that people from around the world seized the opportunity for personal and economic freedom promised by free land. Traveling across oceans and continents, these hard-nosed, pragmatic people began arriving in the 1860s with shovels and ploughs, convinced they were part of something important. They were. Putting hand to plough and breaking the sod for their first crude homes, these hardy settlers left an indelible thumbprint on American history and on the country's character. Though many of their ventures ended in failure, their risks permanently enhanced the nation's diversity and its sense of independence and resourcefulness. 900 Miles from Nowhere is the heartfelt chronicle of the daily lives and personal struggles of Great Plains homesteaders, told in their own voices through many never-before-published letters, diaries, and photographs. Believing absolutely that they could control their own destiny, they bet everything they owned, even in the face of insurmountable obstacles. This is the remarkable and ever-inspiring story of life on the grasslands that stretch from Canada to Mexico.

920 O'Farrell Street: A Jewish Girlhood in Old San Francisco

by Harriet L. Levy Charlene Akers

The girlhood memoir of Harriet Lane Levy, friend and neighbor of Alice B. Toklas, provides an intimate and detailed glimpse into San Francisco's Victorian past.

A. A. Milne: His Life

by Ann Thwaite

A biography of A. A. Milne

A.L.T.: A Memoir

by André Leon Talley

What influences shape a fashionista? For Vogue editor-at-large Talley (born in 1949), the answer is simple: his grandmother Bennie Davis and empress of style Diana Vreeland. In his heartfelt, occasionally affected remembrance, the Southern-born African-American admits he had little experience with Vreeland's brand of luxury but enjoyed "an innate understanding of it," thanks to his grandmother's meticulous sense of propriety. Indeed, his memoir, an homage to two extraordinary women, is less an autobiography than a eulogy. The women's mutual love of polish is "evidence of a deeper philosophy-the primacy of home and the importance of spending time in its service." Talley is a keen observer, and his book salutes beauty and its practitioners from his grandmother to Karl Lagerfeld. He's at his best, however, when recalling his Durham, N.C., childhood, his devoted father and life in a segregated South. He renders tales of Mt. Sinai Baptist Church, family reunions and life during the Civil Rights movement in sumptuous detail. Yet Talley is equally awed by Vreeland, Halston and Mica Ertegun, among his pantheon of fashion royalty, and he considers it a privilege just to sit at their tables. Vreeland, his mentor, enjoys a special place in his heart, and he waxes rhapsodic about her talent as fashion icon and director of the Met's Costume Institute. Between these personal salutes, he details a 30-year hitch in the chiffon trenches, from glam parties and unimagined opulence to the generosity of friends. If Talley has one message, it's "Style transcends race, class, and time." His memoir, though saccharine in spots, is sincere.

A. Lincoln: A Biography

by Ronald C. White Jr.

In this important new biography, Ronald C. White, Jr. offers a fresh and fascinating definition of Lincoln as a man of integrity--what today's commentators are calling "authenticity"--whose internal moral compass is the key to understanding his life. Through meticulous research, utilizing recently discovered Lincoln letters, legal papers, and photographs, White depicts Lincoln as a person of intellectual curiosity, comfortable with ambiguity, and capable of changing his mind. The reader is treated to an exploration of Lincoln's compelling words, his changing ideas on slavery, the shaping of the modern role of Commander-in-Chief, and his surprising religious odyssey. A. Lincoln, so titled for the way Lincoln signed his name, sheds an innovative and profound light on our nation's most beloved leader for a new generation of Americans. "Ronald C. White's A. LINCOLN is the best biography of Lincoln since David Donald's LINCOLN (1995)... Amid all the books on Lincoln that will be published during the coming year, this one will stand out as one of the best." - James M. McPherson, author of Battle Cry of Freedom, and winner of the Pulitzer Prize.

A. N. Krishnarao

by G. S. Amur

Biography of Krishnarao by one of his admirers.

A. Philip Randolph: A Biographical Portrait

by Jervis Anderson

The author details with rare journalistic insight, Randolph's meteoric rise from a young black radical and street orator in Harlem to a prominent member of the labor movement.

A. Philip Randolph: Union Leader and Civil Rights Crusader

by Catherine Reef

Biography of the African-American union leader.

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