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The Gentle Art of Matchmaking and Other Important Things

by John B. Keane

[from the back cover] "John B. Keane was born in Listowel in 1928. Having worked in a variety of jobs in Ireland and England, he married and settled down to run a pub in his native town. Now he is recognised as a major Irish writer, who has written many successful plays and books, Sive, Sharon's Grave, The Highest House on the Mountain, The man from Clare, The Year of the Hiker, The Field, Many Young Men of Twenty, Big Maggie, Moll, Self-Portrait, Letters of a Successful T.D. and Letters of an Irish Parish Priest. This book offers a feast of Keane. The title essay reminds us that, while some marriages are proverbially made in Heaven, others have been made in the back parlour of a celebrated pub in Listowel--and none the worse for that! But John B. Keane has other interests besides match-making, and these pieces mirror many moods and attitudes. Who could ignore Keane on Potato-Cakes? Keane on Skinless Sausages, On Half-Doors? Is there a husband alive who will not recognise someone near and dear to him when he reads, with a mixture of affection and horror, the essay on 'Female Painters'? And, more seriously, there are other pieces that reflect this writer's deep love of tradition; his nostalgic re-creation of an Irish way of life that is gone for ever. Admirers of his plays will recognise in 'Sideways Talkers' and 'the Spirit of Christmas' the ruthless economy of a dramatist who can conjure up a character and a situation in a few lines. The Style is the Man' is a true saying and it has never been more true of any writer than of John B. Keane. He is there-with every inimitable quirk and foible in every line he writes. The characters in his plays are varied enough, but they all bear the stamp of the man who created them. In these essays, where he talks to us directly, his personality sounds out behind every line. No one who has read Letters of a Successful T.D. or seen his plays or encountered 'John B.' on radio or television will dare to miss the Gentle Art of Matchmaking."

Gentle Regrets: Thoughts from a life

by Roger Scruton

In this book the author takes us on a few autobiographical excursions and shares in a moving account the ways in which life brought him to think what he thinks, and to be what he is.

Gentleman Boss: The Life of Chester Alan Arthur

by Thomas C. Reeves

A biography of Chester Arthur.

Gentleman Junkie

by Harlan Ellison

Bold and uncompromising, Gentleman Junkie and Other Stories of the Hung-up Generation is a watershed moment in Harlan Ellison's early writing career. Rather than dealing in speculative fiction, these twenty-five short stories directly tackle issues of discrimination, injustice, bigotry, and oppression by the police. Pulling from his own experience, Ellison paints vivid portraits of the helpless and downtrodden, blazing forth with the kind of unblinking honesty that would define his career. Reviewing this collection, Dorothy Parker called Ellison "a good, honest, clean writer, putting down what he has seen and known, and no sensationalism about it."

A Gentleman of Pleasure

by Brian Busby

A Gentleman of Pleasure not only spans Glassco's life but delves into his background as a member of a once prominent and powerful Montreal family. In addition to Glassco's readily available work, Brian Busby draws on pseudonymous writings published as a McGill student as well as unpublished and previously unknown poems, letters, and journal entries to detail a vibrant life while pulling back the curtain on Glassco's sexuality and unconventional tastes. In a lively account of a man given to deception, who took delight in hoaxes, Busby manages to substantiate many of the often unreliable statements Glassco made about his life and work. A Gentleman of Pleasure is a remarkable biography that captures the knowable truth about a fascinatingly complex and secretive man.

Gentleman Revolutionary: Gouverneur Morris, the Rake Who Wrote the Constitution

by Richard Brookhiser

The author of several books on the US founding fathers portrays the politics and pleasure-loving life of the rarely credited draftsman of the Constitution's final form and author of its "We the people" preamble, during the American and French Revolutions. Annotation ©2004 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (

Gentlemen Bankers: The World of J. P. Morgan

by Susie J. Pak

Gentlemen Bankers focuses on the social and economic circles of one of America's most renowned and influential financiers, J. P. Morgan, to tell a closely focused story of how economic and political interests intersected with personal rivalries and friendships among the Wall Street aristocracy during the first half of the twentieth century.

Gentlemen's Disagreement: Alfred Kinsey, Lewis Terman, and the Sexual Politics of Smart Men

by Peter Hegarty

What is the relationship between intelligence and sex? In recent decades, studies of the controversial histories of both intelligence testing and of human sexuality in the United States have been increasingly common--and hotly debated. But rarely have the intersections of these histories been examined. In Gentlemen's Disagreement, Peter Hegarty enters this historical debate by recalling the debate between Lewis Terman--the intellect who championed the testing of intelligence-- and pioneering sex researcher Alfred Kinsey, and shows how intelligence and sexuality have interacted in American psychology. Through a fluent discussion of intellectually gifted onanists, unhappily married men, queer geniuses, lonely frontiersmen, religious ascetics, and the two scholars themselves, Hegarty traces the origins of Terman's complaints about Kinsey's work to show how the intelligence testing movement was much more concerned with sexuality than we might remember. And, drawing on Foucault, Hegarty reconciles these legendary figures by showing how intelligence and sexuality in early American psychology and sexology were intertwined then and remain so to this day.

The Geography of Bliss: One Grump's Search for the Happiest Places in the World

by Eric Weiner

Weiner investigates why some places are happy, notably the Netherlands, Switzerland, Bhutan, Qatar, Iceland, Moldova, Thailand, Great Britain, India, and America.

A Geography of Blood

by Candace Savage

*Finalist, Hilary Weston Writers' Trust Prize for Non-FictionWhen Candace Savage and her partner buy a house in the romantic little town of Eastend, she has no idea what awaits her. At first she enjoys exploring the area around their new home, including the boyhood haunts of the celebrated American writer Wallace Stegner, the back roads of the Cypress Hills, the dinosaur skeletons at the T.Rex Discovery Centre, the fossils to be found in the dust-dry hills. She also revels in her encounters with the wild inhabitants of this mysterious land-three coyotes in a ditch at night, their eyes glinting in the dark; a deer at the window; a cougar pussy-footing it through a gully a few minutes' walk from town.But as Savage explores further, she uncovers a darker reality-a story of cruelty and survival set in the still-recent past--and finds that she must reassess the story she grew up with as the daughter, granddaughter, and great-granddaughter of prairie homesteaders.Beautifully written, impeccably researched, and imbued with Savage's passion for this place, A Geography of Blood offers both a shocking new version of plains history and an unforgettable portrait of the windswept, shining country of the Cypress Hills.

The Geography of Love

by Glenda Burgess

When Glenda Burgess and Kenneth Grunzweig met in 1988, Kenneth had already lost two wives--the first in a fatal car crash, and then years later his second wife in a brutal murder for which Kenneth remained for many years the prime suspect. What possesses a woman to fall in love with a man fourteen years her senior, with a troubled teenage daughter and a past shadowed with so much suspicion and misfortune? And why would a man who has loved and lost in such tragic ways take a chance on opening his heart to another woman, despite the odds? Beautifully written and heart-wrenchingly honest,The Geography of Love is a poignant and unforgettable chronicle of a relationship that defies convention and survives the unthinkable.

The Geography of Memory

by Jeanne Murray Walker

Award-winning poet Jeanne Murray Walker tells an extraordinarily wise, witty, and quietly wrenching tale of her mother's long passage into dementia. This powerful story explores parental love, profound grief, and the unexpected consolation of memory. While Walker does not flinch from the horrors of "the ugly twins, aging and death," her eye for the apt image provides a window into unexpected joy and humor even during the darkest days. This is a multi-layered narrative of generations, faith, and friendship. As Walker leans in to the task of caring for her mother, their relationship unexpectedly deepens and becomes life-giving. Her mother's memory, which more and more dwells in the distant past, illuminates Walker's own childhood. She rediscovers and begins to understand her own past, as well as to enter more fully into her mother's final years. THE GEOGRAPHY OF MEMORY is not only a personal journey made public in the most engaging, funny, and revealing way possible, here is a story of redemption for anyone who is caring for or expecting to care for ill and aging parents-and for all the rest of us as well.

Geography of the Heart

by Fenton Johnson

In 1990, Larry Rose, the partner of novelist Fenton Johnson, died of complications from AIDS. In Geography of the Heart, Fenton, author of Scissors, Paper, Rock, Songs of the Soil, and Crossing the River, honors Rose with a beautifully written memoir.

Geons, Black Holes, and Quantum Foam: A Life in Physics

by Kenneth Ford John Archibald Wheeler

The autobiography of one of the preeminent figures in twentieth-century physics. He studied with Niels Bohr, taught Richard Feynman, and boned up on relativity with his friend and colleague Albert Einstein. John Archibald Wheeler's fascinating life brings us face to face with the central characters and discoveries of modern physics. He was the first American to learn of the discovery of nuclear fission, later coined the term "black hole," led a renaissance in gravitation physics, and helped to build Princeton University into a mecca for physicists. From nuclear physics, to quantum theory, to relativity and gravitation, Wheeler's work has set the trajectory of research for half a century. His career has brought him into contact with the most brilliant minds of his field; Fermi, Bethe, Rabi, Teller, Oppenheimer, and Wigner are among those he called colleagues and friends. In this rich autobiography, Wheeler reveals in fascinating detail the excitement of each discovery, the character of each colleague, and the underlying passion for knowledge that drives him still.

George B. McClellan

by Stephen W. Sears

Stephen Sears posits that "General McClellan's importance in shaping the course of the Union during the Civil War was matched only by that of President Lincoln and Generals Grant and Sherman." And yet the "Young Napoleon" has been relegated to the shadows by historians of that great conflict. The youngest in his class at West Point, McClellan was, by age thirty-five, commander of all the Northern armies; he fought the longest and largest campaign of the time and the single bloodiest battle in the nation's history; at thirty-seven, he was nominated for the presidency of the United States by the Democratic party but was soundly defeated by Abraham Lincoln, whom McClellan held in contempt. Believing beyond any doubt that Confederate forces were greater than his and that enemies at his back conspired to defeat him, he equally believed that he was God's chosen instrument to save the Union. Drawing entirely on primary sources, Stephen Sears has given us the first full picture of the contradictory McClellan, a man possessed by demons and delusions.

George B. McClellan: The Young Napoleon

by Stephen W. Sears

Biography of the Civil War General.

George Balanchine

by Robert Gottlieb

The foremost contemporary choreographer in the history of ballet, George Balanchine extended the art form into radical new paths that came to seem inevitable under his direction. He transformed movement and dance in classical and modern ballet, on the Broadway stage, and in the cinema. George Balanchine chronicles the life and achievements of this visionary artist from his early, almost accidental career in Russia, where his lifelong collaboration with Igor Stravinsky was forged, to his extraordinary accomplishments in America. The editor and writer Robert Gottlieb, one of the most knowledgeable dance critics in America, offers a superb and loving portrait of a genius who, though married many times to many ballerinas, remained truest to his greatest love, Terpischore, the Greek Muse of dance.

George, Being George

by Nelson W. Aldrich

Norman Mailer said that George Plimpton was the best-loved man in New York. For more than fifty years, his friends made a circle whose circumference was vast and whose center was a fashionable tenement on New York's East Seventy-second street. Taxi drivers, hearing his address, would ask, "Isn't that George Plimpton's place?" George was always giving parties for his friends. It was one of the ways this generous man gave back.This book is the party that was George's life-and it's a big one-attended by scores of people, including Peter Matthiessen, Robert Silvers, Jean Stein, William Styron, Maggie Paley, Gay Talese, Calvin Trillin, and Gore Vidal, as well as lesser-known intimates and acquaintances, each with candid and compelling stories to tell about George Plimpton and childhood rebellion, adult indiscretions, literary tastes, ego trips, loyalties and jealousies, riches and drugs, and embracing life no matter the consequences.In George, Being George people feel free to say what guests say at parties when the subject of the conversation isn't around anymore. Some even prove the adage that no best-loved man goes unpunished. Together, they provide a complete portrait of George Plimpton. They talk about his life: its privileged beginnings, its wild and triumphant middle, its brave, sad end. They say that George was a man of many parts: "the last gentleman"; founder and first editor of one of our best literary magazines, The Paris Review; the graceful writer who brought the New Journalism to sports in bestsellers such as Paper Lion, Bogey Man, and Out of My League; and Everyman's proxy boxer, trapeze artist, stand-up comic, Western movie villain, and Playboy centerfold photographer. And one of the brave men who wrestled Sirhan Sirhan, the armed assassin of his friend Bobby Kennedy, to the ground. A Plimpton party was full of intelligent, funny, articulate people. So is this one. Many try hard to understand George, and some (not always the ones you would expect) are brilliant at it. Here is social life as it's actually lived by New York's elites. The only important difference between a party at George's and this book is that no one here is drunk. They just talk about being drunk.George's last years were awesome, truly so. His greatest gift was to be a blessing to others-not all, sadly-and that gift ended only with his death. But his parties, if this is one, need never end at all.From the Hardcover edition.

George Best

by Ivan Ponting

George Best was sheer magic. Plucked from the mean streets of Belfast by a canny old scout, he astonished everyone at Old Trafford with his unique gift for the game, bursting into Matt Busby's first team at 17. He starred as Manchester United won the League title in 1964/65 while still in his teens and fame followed. 'El Beatle' became football's first pop idol in 1966 after the match of his life against Benfica in Lisbon. He shone again in 1966/67 as the Red Devils clinched the League title once more and then he was central to the lifting of the European Cup in 1968. Packed full of rare photos and personal insight from the men who knew him best on the pitch, the likes of Sir Bobby Charlton and Denis Law, this book examines the career of a legend, celebrates the talent of a truly exceptional footballer and nods in heartfelt appreciation to the sporting gods who sent George Best to thrill us all.

George Bowering: Bright Circles of Colour

by Eva-Marie Kröller

This first book-length study of Bowering explores the relationship between his work and the arts.

George Did It

by Suzanne Tripp Jurmain

Everyone wanted George Washington to be the president. He was responsible, led the army in a fight against the British, and helped write the Constitution. But being the president is a very important job, and George was too nervous. So, to everyone surprise, he said no! However, George had many supporters, and with the help of the cheering crowds and loyal advisers and dignitaries, George realized that he didn't have time to think about how nervous he was, he just had to do his job. With little-known facts and a bit of humor, Suzanne Tripp Jurmain gives readers a glimpse into the more personal side of the first president of the United States.

George Eliot

by Jennifer Uglow

This biography of one of the greatest English novelists sheds important new light on George Eliot's audacious life and powerful works, including such masterpieces as "Middlemarch" and "The Mill on the Floss". In her own lifetime, Eliot was widely condemned as a fallen woman: she dared to live openly with a man she could never marry, and shortly after his death married a man twenty years her junior. Her defiance of the conventions that ruled most Victorian women's lives did not prevent her achieving both great professional success and personal happiness. Why, then, did she deny so many of her gifted, headstrong heroines the same opportunities?

George Eliot's Intellectual Life

by Avrom Fleishman

It is well known that George Eliot's intelligence and her wide knowledge of literature, history, philosophy and religion shaped her fiction, but until now no study has followed the development of her thinking through her whole career. This intellectual biography traces the course of that development from her initial Christian culture, through her loss of faith and working out of a humanistic and cautiously progressive world view, to the thought-provoking achievements of her novels. It focuses on her responses to her reading in her essays, reviews and letters as well as in the historical pictures of Romola, the political implications of Felix Holt, the comprehensive view of English society in Middlemarch, and the visionary account of personal inspiration in Daniel Deronda. This portrait of a major Victorian intellectual is an important addition to our understanding of Eliot's mind and works, as well as of her place in nineteenth-century British culture.

George F. Kennan

by John Lewis Gaddis

Winner of the Pulitzer Prize Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award Selected by The New York Times Book Review as a Notable Book of the Year Drawing on extensive interviews with George Kennan and exclusive access to his archives, an eminent scholar of the Cold War delivers a revelatory biography of its troubled mastermind. In the late 1940s, George Kennan wrote two documents, the "Long Telegram" and the "X Article," which set forward the strategy of containment that would define U. S. policy toward the Soviet Union for the next four decades. This achievement alone would qualify him as the most influential American diplomat of the Cold War era. But he was also an architect of the Marshall Plan, a prizewinning historian, and would become one of the most outspoken critics of American diplomacy, politics, and culture during the last half of the twentieth century. Now the full scope of Kennan's long life and vast influence is revealed by one of today's most important Cold War scholars. Yale historian John Lewis Gaddis began this magisterial history almost thirty years ago, interviewing Kennan frequently and gaining complete access to his voluminous diaries and other personal papers. So frank and detailed were these materials that Kennan and Gaddis agreed that the book would not appear until after Kennan's death. It was well worth the wait: the journals give this book a breathtaking candor and intimacy that match its century-long sweep. We see Kennan's insecurity as a Midwesterner among elites at Princeton, his budding dissatisfaction with authority and the status quo, his struggles with depression, his gift for satire, and his sharp insights on the policies and people he encountered. Kennan turned these sharp analytical gifts upon himself, even to the point of regularly recording dreams. The result is a remarkably revealing view of how this greatest of Cold War strategists came to doubt his strategy and always doubted himself. This is a landmark work of history and biography that reveals the vast influence and rich inner landscape of a life that both mirrored and shaped the century it spanned.

Showing 7,601 through 7,625 of 23,855 results


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