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Fear of Our Father : The True Story of Abuse, Murder, and Family Ties

by Stacey Kananen Lisa Bonnice

Even after a childhood of abuse and fear, Stacey M. Kananen was shocked when her brother, Rickie, admitted his guilt in the cold-blooded murder of their terrifying father, and years later, their helpless mother. But the greatest shock was to come--when he claimed that Stacey had helped him. In 1988, when Rickie and Stacey's father, Richard Kananen Sr., apparently left their home in Orlando, Florida, the family was so relieved that they never reported him missing. Fifteen years later to the day, their mother disappeared. When police became suspicious, Rickie admitted to Stacey that their father's body was under the cement floor of their mother's garage, and their mother was buried in Stacey's own backyard. Overwhelmed by grief and horror, Stacey's brother convinced her that they should commit suicide. After a failed attempt, she woke to discover her brother arrested--along with the realization that he had probably never intended to kill himself at all. But his betrayals were not yet over: On the eve of his trial in 2007, he suddenly claimed Stacey had been in on it, and she found herself charged with murder with a gung ho rookie detective who was convinced she was involved. This is the tragic and triumphant account of one woman's struggle to overcome her past, clear her name in what would become a dramatic public spectacle of a trial, and finally escape the nightmares that had haunted her entire life.

Fear on Trial: Revised and Updated

by John Henry Faulk

The heart of the book is the trial of Faulk's libel action against AWARE, in which attorney Louis Nizer relentlessly exposed the blacklist for what it was--a cynical disdain of elementary decency couched in the rhetoric of patriotism.

Fear Strikes Out

by Jim Piersall Al Hirshberg

A star of the 1950s Red Sox recounts his career and his battle with mental illnessWhen Jim Piersall first donned a Boston Red Sox uniform, he quickly distinguished himself as one of baseball's most colorful figures. Prone to wild rages, he argued with umpires, managers, and his fellow teammates, showing off an unpredictable personality that fans and sportswriters ate up, but which infuriated his club. His behavior became more erratic until he suffered a violent breakdown that saw him institutionalized and diagnosed with bipolar disorder. Cowritten with Boston sportswriter Al Hirshberg, this is the story of Piersall's collapse and his subsequent attempt to return to the major leagues. A shattering confessional of mental hardship, Fear Strikes Out is an unforgettable look at the difficulties of playing sports at the highest level.

Fear to Freedom: What If You Did Not Have to Be So Afraid?

by Rosemary Trible

Does fear hold you back from living with freedom and confidence? Does anxiety rob your joy? Rosemary Trible was a successful young woman, a television talk-show host with a husband on his way to becoming a U. S. Congressman, when she was savagely raped at gunpoint. Even though she recovered physically she found that her attacker had not only brutally violated her, he had stolen her joy and her ability to live without terror and fear. Her book deals with sexual assault, terror, forgiveness and healing. It's about big dreams, the death of dreams and becoming bold enough to dream again and make a difference in the world for good. It's about growing out of cultural boxes, moving into racial reconciliation and building friendships that only God could make possible.

Fear Up Harsh

by Tony Lagouranis Allen Mikaelian

"Something really bad happened here. " So begins Army interrogator Tony Lagouranis's first briefing at Abu Ghraib. While Lagouranis's training stressed the rules of the Geneva Conventions, once in Iraq, he discovered that pushing the legal limits of interrogation was encouraged. Under orders, he-along with numerous other soldiers-abused and terrorized Iraqis by adding "enhancements" like dogs, hypothermia, and other techniques to "Fear Up Harsh"-the official tactic designed to frighten prisoners into revealing information. And he saw others do far worse. The first Army interrogator to publicly step forward and break the silence surrounding these tactics, Lagouranis reveals what went on in Iraqi prisons- raising crucial questions about American conduct abroad. .

Fearless Female Journalists

by Joy Crysdale

This book tells the inspiring stories of ten women, in all types of journalism, who put themselves at risk to do their jobs. Put all together, their lives also tell the story of journalism itself, its importance to society and the struggle that the women in this field have gone through to do the work that they love and to provide an essential service to society. In an age when many young people's experience of journalism is limited to celebrity gossip and sports scores, Fearless Female Journalists demonstrates the essential role that these women have played, by telling the stories of just a few of those who are willing to stand up to ridicule, make personal sacrifices and even, in some cases, lose their lives to tell the stories that need to be told.

Fearless: The Heroic Story of One Navy Seal's Sacrifice in the Hunt for Osama Bin Laden and the Unwavering Devotion of the Woman Who Loved Him

by Eric Blehm

Fearless takes you deep into SEAL Team SIX, straight to the heart of one of its most legendary operators. When Navy SEAL Adam Brown woke up on March 17, 2010, he didn't know he would die that night in the Hindu Kush Mountains of Afghanistan--but he was ready: In a letter to his children, not meant to be seen unless the worst happened, he wrote, "I'm not afraid of anything that might happen to me on this earth, because I know no matter what, nothing can take my spirit from me." Long before Adam Brown became a member of the elite SEAL Team SIX--the counterterrorism unit that took down Osama bin Laden--he was a fun-loving country boy from Hot Springs, Arkansas, whose greatest goal had been to wear his high school's football jersey. An undersized daredevil, prone to jumping off roofs into trees and off bridges into lakes, Adam was a kid who broke his own bones but would never break a promise to his parents.But after high school, Adam fell in with the wrong crowd and his family watched as his appetite for risk dragged him into a downward spiral that eventually landed him in jail. Battling his inner demons on a last-chance road to redemption, Adam had one goal: to become the best of the best--a US Navy SEAL. An absorbing chronicle of heroism and humanity, Fearless presents an indelible portrait of a highly trained warrior who would enter a village with weapons in hand to hunt terrorists, only to come back the next day with an armload of shoes and meals for local children. It is a deeply personal, revealing glimpse inside the SEAL Team SIX brotherhood that also shows how these elite operators live out the rest of their lives, away from danger, as husbands, fathers and friends. Fearless is the story of a man of extremes, whose courage and determination was fueled by faith, family, and the love of a woman. It's about a man who waged a war against his own worst impulses and persevered to reach the top tier of the US military. Always the first to volunteer for the most dangerous assignments, Adam's final act of bravery led to the ultimate sacrifice. Adam Brown was a devoted man who was an unlikely hero but a true warrior, described by all who knew him as fearless.

Feasting the Heart

by Reynolds Price

In the fall of 1993, Alice Winkler of National Public Radio's "Morning Edition" asked Reynolds Price to write a short story for a Christmas morning broadcast. This assignment would result in NPR's inviting Price to join its varied group of commentators on "All Things Considered." The laws of radio require a concision that has become a welcome new discipline for Price; and here are all the personal essays which he has broadcast since July 25, 1995. Whether recounting events from his past, examining the details of his current experience as a writer, teacher, traveler, and general witness of the world, Price demonstrates in his direct prose that a writer can instantly connect with his audience. He discusses a few predictable topics -- family, the poisonous mysteries of racial intolerance, and faith -- but he also deals with new matters: capital punishment, Gone With the Wind, his adventures while navigating an immensely inaccessible America in a wheelchair; and he provides a memorable piece on childlessness. Throughout, Price never loses sight of the origin of either the word or the spirit of the essay -- the French word connotes a try, an attempt -- and each piece here is a well-formed, revealing, often amusing and refreshing foray into a moment unlike any we've encountered in other forms from him. We're unlikely to read more thought-provoking work from a commentator for a great time to come.

Feather Brained: My Bumbling Quest to Become a Birder and Find a Rare Bird on My Own

by Bob Tarte

For much of his life, the closest Bob Tarte got to a nature walk was the stroll from parking lot to picnic table on family outings. But then a chance sighting of a dazzling rose-breasted grosbeak in wife-to-be Linda's backyard prompts a fascination with birds, which he had never cared about before in the least. Soon he is obsessed with spotting more and more of them--the rarer the better--and embarks on a bumpy journey to improve his bumbling birding skills. Along the way, Tarte offers readers a droll look at the pleasures and pitfalls he encounters, introduces a colorful cast of fellow birders from across the country, and travels to some of the premier birding sites in the Midwest, including Point Pelee, Magee Marsh, Tawas Point State Park, and even Muskegon Wastewater System. This funny, heartfelt memoir will appeal to birders of all skill levels as well as to anyone who knows and loves a birder.

Feathered Serpent: A Novel of the Mexican Conquest

by Colin Falconer

The triumphant, controversial life of the Aztec woman Malinali is one of the great and enduring legends of Mexico. A high-born Mexica heiress, she was sold into slavery as a child, and it was as a slave of the Maya that she met the Spanish conquistador Hernán Cortés. To her, and many of the Mexica, Cortés, with his flowing beard and pale skin, was Feathered Serpent, the god whose return to earth foretold the end of Montezuma's fabled empire. The daughter of a prophet, Malinali knew her fate lay with Feathered Serpent and his invaders. To this day she is reviled as a traitor by Mexico's native people, but is also honored as a heroine and symbolic mother of a mixed-race nation. This is her story--and the story of the Spanish conquest of Mexico, which for better or worse changed the Americas forever. In Feathered Serpent, Colin Falconer brings the Aztec empire to life in blazing color and gives voice to the incomparable Malinali, who transcended her role as Cortés's translator and consort to become a fiery agent of history against all odds.

The Feathery Tribe

by Daniel Lewis

Amateurs and professionals studying birds at the end of the nineteenth century were a contentious, passionate group with goals that intersected, collided and occasionally merged in their writings and organizations. Driven by a desire to advance science, as well as by ego, pride, honor, insecurity, religion and other clashing sensibilities, they struggled to absorb the implications of evolution after Darwin. In the process, they dramatically reshaped the study of birds. Daniel Lewis here explores the professionalization of ornithology through one of its key figures: Robert Ridgway, the Smithsonian Institution's first curator of birds and one of North America's most important natural scientists. Exploring a world in which the uses of language, classification and accountability between amateurs and professionals played essential roles, Lewis offers a vivid introduction to Ridgway and shows how his work fundamentally influenced the direction of American and international ornithology. He explores the inner workings of the Smithsonian and the role of collectors working in the field and reveals previously unknown details of the ornithological journalThe Aukand the untold story of the color dictionaries for which Ridgway is known.

February 1965: The Final Speeches

by Malcolm X Steve Clark

During the three weeks prior to his assassination on February 21, 1965, Malcolm X spoke to audiences in Britain and France and across the U.S. This is the first in a series of books that will collect--in chronological order--the major speeches and writings of this great revolutionary thinker and leader of the 20th century.

Fed, White, and Blue

by Simon Majumdar Alton Brown

Simon Majumdar is probably not your typical idea of an immigrant. As he says, "I'm well rested, not particularly poor, and the only time I ever encounter 'huddled masses' is in line at Costco." But immigrate he did, and thanks to a Homeland Security agent who asked if he planned to make it official, the journey chronicled in Fed, White, and Blue was born. In it, Simon sets off on a trek across the United States to find out what it really means to become an American, using what he knows best: food.Simon stops in Plymouth, Massachusetts, to learn about what the pilgrims ate (and that playing Wampanoag football with large men is to be avoided); a Shabbat dinner in Kansas; Wisconsin to make cheese (and get sprayed with hot whey); and LA to cook at a Filipino restaurant in the hope of making his in-laws proud. Simon attacks with gusto the food cultures that make up America--brewing beer, farming, working at a food bank, and even finding himself at a tailgate. Full of heart, humor, history, and of course, food, Fed, White, and Blue is a warm, funny, and inspiring portrait of becoming American.

Federer and Me: A Story of Obsession

by William Skidelsky

In this wildly entertaining and informative memoir reminiscent of Nick Hornby's Fever Pitch--but for the world of tennis--one man recounts his all-consuming obsession with Roger Federer and delves into the fascinating history and evolution of this beloved sport.For much of the past decade, William Skidelsky has had an all-consuming devotion to Roger Federer, whom he considers to be the greatest and most graceful tennis player of all time. In this mesmerizing memoir, Skidelsky ponders what it is about the Swiss star that transfixes him and countless others. Skidelsky dissects the wonders of Federer's forehand, reflects on his rivalry with Nadal, revels in his victories, and relives his most crushing defeats. But in charting his obsession, Skidelsky also weaves his own past into a captivating story that explores the evolution of modern tennis, the role of beauty in sports, and the psychology of fandom. Thought-provoking and beautifully written, Federer and Me is a frank, funny, and touching account of one fan's life.

Feed-Forward: On the Future of Twenty-First-Century Media

by Mark B. N. Hansen

Even as media in myriad forms increasingly saturate our lives, we nonetheless tend to describe our relationship to it in terms from the twentieth century: we are consumers of media, choosing to engage with it. In Feed-Forward, Mark B. N. Hansen shows just how outmoded that way of thinking is: media is no longer separate from us but has become an inescapable part of our very experience of the world. Drawing on the speculative empiricism of philosopher Alfred North Whitehead, Hansen reveals how new media call into play elements of sensibility that greatly affect human selfhood without in any way belonging to the human. From social media to data-mining to new sensor technologies, media in the twenty-first century work largely outside the realm of perceptual consciousness, yet at the same time inflect our every sensation. Understanding that paradox, Hansen shows, offers us a chance to put forward a radically new vision of human becoming, one that enables us to reground the human in a non-anthropocentric view of the world and our experience in it.

Feed the Hungry: A Memoir with Recipes

by Nani Power

An author whose fiction has been praised by Mary Gaitskill ("Passionate, intelligent, and piercingly beautiful. . . an altogether striking debut") and Darcy Steinke ("Nani Power. . . shows that sensuality pervades all of life and is too powerful to be contained in the bedroom alone"), Nani Power turns her incredible storytelling talents to memoir, crafting a sublime work of nonfiction centered around a life of travel, eclectic dining, and dealing with her decidedly eccentric Southern bohemian family. Consumption is the real American pastime. Through the prism of food, we all see our pasts differently. Like the finest food writers, Power brings readers directly into her world through the evocative depiction of the experience of eating. From her childhood on a rambling farm in Virginia -- during which she witnessed a saga of fighting, disowning, silencing, and other regrettable acts -- to her peripatetic and international adult life, Power's reflections are surprising, enthralling, and entertaining. She has a deep understanding of the cuisines of Peru and Mexico, Iran and India; her stints as a sandwich seller in Rio, a waitress in the East Village, a funeral caterer in the Deep South, and on a food junket to Japan all seem familiar as she relates each experience to us through its cuisine. A wealth of detailed recipes throughout the book offer a chance to recreate Power's memories in perpetuity. Lyrical and uplifting, unflinching and brave,Feed the Hungryis a supple, evocative memoir of food, travel, Americana, and family history, written with all the creativity, tenderness, grit, and verve we have come to expect from this uncommonly gifted writer.

Feeding a Yen

by Calvin Trillin

Calvin Trillin has never been a champion of the "continental cuisine" palaces he used to refer to as La Maison de la Casa House--nor of their successors, the trendy spots he calls "sleepy-time restaurants, where everything is served on a bed of something else." What he treasures is the superb local specialty. And he will go anywhere to find one.As it happens, some of Trillin's favorite dishes--pimientos de Padrón in northern Spain, for instance, or pan bagnat in Nice or posole in New Mexico--can't be found anywhere but in their place of origin. Those dishes are on his Register of Frustration and Deprivation. "On gray afternoons, I go over it," he writes, "like a miser who is both tantalizing and tormenting himself by poring over a list of people who owe him money." On brighter afternoons, he calls his travel agent. Trillin shares charming and funny tales of managing to have another go at, say, fried marlin in Barbados or the barbecue of his boyhood in Kansas City. Sometimes he returns with yet another listing for his Register--as when he travels to Ecuador for ceviche, only to encounter fanesca, a soup so difficult to make that it "should appear on an absolutely accurate menu as Potage Labor Intensive."We join the hunt for the authentic fish taco. We tag along on the "boudin blitzkrieg" in the part of Louisiana where people are accustomed to buying boudin and polishing it off in the parking lot or in their cars ("Cajun boudin not only doesn't get outside the state, it usually doesn't even get home"). In New York, we follow Trillin as he roams Queens with the sort of people who argue about where to find the finest Albanian burek and as he tries to use a glorious local specialty, the New York bagel, to lure his daughters back from California ("I understand that in some places out there if you buy a dozen wheat-germ bagels you get your choice of a bee-pollen bagel or a ginseng bagel free").Feeding a Yen is a delightful reminder of why New York magazine called Calvin Trillin "our funniest food writer."From the Hardcover edition.

Feeding on Dreams

by Ariel Dorfman

In September 1973, the military took power in Chile, and Ariel Dorfman, a young leftist allied with President Allende, was forced to flee for his life. In Feeding on Dreams, Dorfman portrays, through visceral scenes and powerful intellect, the personal and political maelstroms that have defined his life since the Pinochet coup. In Buenos Aires, he's on the run from death squads. Next, still holding out hope for Chile's return to democracy, he lives in ever-rotating safe houses in Paris and Amsterdam, where his loyalty to his political party and his wife's loyalty to him are dramatically tested. Finally he finds an uneasy refuge in America, his childhood home. And then, seventeen years after he was forced to leave Chile, Pinochet is out and Dorfman goes back to live there, setting in motion an unimaginable outcome. Dorfman's wry and masterfully told account provides a page-turning tour of the past several decades of North/South political history and of the complex consequences of revolution and tyranny. He has lived in the aftermath of revolution, and his perspective could not be more relevant today. Feeding on Dreams is a passionate reminder that "we are all exiles," that we are all "threatened with annihilation if we do not find and celebrate the refuge of common humanity," as Dorfman did during his "decades of loss and resurrection."

Feeding the Green Monster: One Man's Season at Fenway Park

by Rob Neyer

ESPN.com columnist describes his experiences during the spring of 2000 when he attended all the Red Sox home games.

A Feel for the Game

by Ben Crenshaw

With two Masters Championships, nineteen career PGA victories, three NCAA Championships, and millions in earnings, Ben Crenshaw is without question one of the most successful golfers of the century. But Crenshaw's claim to fame goes beyond his individual performances. As captain of the 1999 Ryder Cup team, Crenshaw confronted the largest deficit in tournament history-and the skepticism of commentators who suggested that he was the wrong man to manage the team in today's dog-eat-dog, mindgame world of match-play golf. Twenty-four hours later, Crenshaw proved all the critics wrong. In a hard-fought competition that kept viewers glued to their televisions, he brilliantly motivated a team of diverse personalities and, in the most thrilling match in Ryder Cup history, brought the Cup back to American soil. And he did it his way-with grace, honor, dedication, and an encyclopedic knowledge of how the game should be played. A Feel for the Gameis Crenshaw's warm tribute to golf and its traditions. He describes his early years learning the game from famed golf guru Harvey Penick, and takes readers through his career as an outstanding amateur to his glorious years on the PGA Tour, culminating in the climactic Ryder Cup victory. He introduces the players and teachers who have inspired him, from Penick and Bobby Jones to Jackie Burke, Tom Kite, and Payne Stewart. His reminiscences, his fascinating glimpses into golf history, and his unparalleled understanding of the nuances of play make this an engaging personal portrait of a man and a game that were made for each other.

Feel no Fear: The Power, Passion and Politics of a Life in Gymnastics

by Bela Karolyi Nancy Ann Richardson

This book, written by one of the most well-known and contervercial coaches in gymnastics history, follows Bela Karolyi from his boyhood in a remote part of the Former Soviet Union to his Olympic glory with stars such as Nadia Comeneci and Mary-Lou Retton. He, along with his wife Marta, have created a gymnastics dynasty that is remarkable.

Feel: Robbie Williams

by Chris Heath

Chris Heath shares his experience of shadowing Robbie for eighteen months. Follow him on the journey with this upclose and personal account and get to know Robbie as you've never known him before!

A Feeling for the Organism: The Life and Work of Barbara McClintock

by Evelyn F. Keller W. H. Freeman

Biography of the scientist, written in 1983 before she was awarded the Nobel Prize.

Feingold: A New Democratic Party

by Sanford D. Horwitt

Russ Feingold is a rarity in American politics. A staunch civil libertarian, he was the only member of the U.S. Senate who voted against the ill-conceived USA Patriot Act that was rushed through Congress in the wake of the September 11 terrorist attacks. In 2002, while the Bush administration's fabrications and scare tactics persuaded an overwhelming majority of the Senate to vote for the Iraq war resolution, Feingold opposed it. Washington insiders thought such controversial votes could doom Feingold's 2004 reelection. But he won by a near landslide, far outdistancing his party's presidential candidate, John Kerry. Sanford D. Horwitt writes in this timely, compelling independent biography that Russ Feingold "represents the progressive side of the Democratic divide more clearly and authentically than any successful politician on the national stage." The third-term senator's willingness to take bold stands -- he was the first in the Senate to call for a timetable for redeploying U.S. troops from Iraq -- has inspired a growing number of rank-and-file Democrats across the country. Drawing on scores of interviews and historical documents, Horwitt shows that Feingold's authenticity is deeply rooted in the old progressive tradition personified by one of his heroes, Robert M. La Follette, the legendary Wisconsin governor and U.S. senator. "Fighting Bob" and the other great reformers of the Progressive Era placed a high value on honest, efficient government, investment in public education, health and infrastructure, and curbs on corporate power and other wealthy interests in the political process. Feingold became known to a national audience when he teamed up with Republican John McCain on campaign finance reform legislation. After a seven-year battle, the McCain-Feingold bill became the first major reform of the campaign laws since the Watergate era. Feingold, who grew up in a small southeastern Wisconsin town, is a man of modest means and the grandson of Jewish immigrants. In this lively portrait, Horwitt evokes mid-century Janesville, a Republican stronghold on the banks of the Rock River, where a precocious Rusty Feingold absorbed lifelong lessons about the importance of community and personal integrity. Beginning with his first election to public office, he has defied conventional political wisdom and long odds, Horwitt tells us, a pattern that has been repeated throughout his career. Feingold has shown how a new, reinvigorated Democratic Party can stand for progressive ideals, resist the corrupting influence of special interests and win elections.

Feisty First Ladies and Other Unforgettable White House Women

by Autumn Stephens

First ladies are supposed to be dignified background figures, quietly supportive of their husbands' agendas. Above all, they're not supposed to act out or cause even a whiff of scandal. Of course, reality often overrides conventional wisdom, and this book shows how far from the prim ideal many of the Presidents' wives have strayed. Part irreverent portrait gallery, part exuberant expose, Feisty First Ladies and Other Unforgettable White House Women introduces a remarkable array of wild women, from Martha Washington, who opposed her own husband's presidential election; to Abraham Lincoln's eccentric wife, Mary; to rebellious daughters like Patti Davis who were the tabloid fodder of their day. Laugh-out-loud funny and filled with amazing stranger-than-fiction facts from our American history, Feisty First Ladies journeys into the realm of the eclectic sisterhood whose outrageous words and deeds have rocked the fusty old foundations of the White House - and the nation!

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