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Showing 1,901 through 1,925 of 2,048 results

Water Sings Blue: Ocean Poems

by Kate Coombs Meilo So

Come down to the shore with this rich and vivid celebration of the ocean! With watercolors gorgeous enough to wade in by award-winning artist Meilo So and playful, moving poems by Kate Coombs, Water Sings Blue evokes the beauty and power, the depth and mystery, and the endless resonance of the sea.

Water Storage : Water Storage:Tanks, Cisterns, Aquifers, and Ponds

by Art Ludwig

A how-to handbook on building your own water tanks, ponds etc. and on maintaining groundwater tables, all based on principles of ecological design.

The Wave: In Pursuit of the Rogues, Freaks and Giants of the Ocean

by Susan Casey

From Susan Casey, bestselling author of The Devil's Teeth, an astonishing book about colossal, ship-swallowing rogue waves and the surfers who seek them out. For centuries, mariners have spun tales of gargantuan waves, 100-feet high or taller. Until recently scientists dismissed these stories--waves that high would seem to violate the laws of physics. But in the past few decades, as a startling number of ships vanished and new evidence has emerged, oceanographers realized something scary was brewing in the planet's waters. They found their proof in February 2000, when a British research vessel was trapped in a vortex of impossibly mammoth waves in the North Sea--including several that approached 100 feet. As scientists scramble to understand this phenomenon, others view the giant waves as the ultimate challenge. There are extreme surfers who fly around the world trying to ride the ocean's most destructive monsters. The pioneer of extreme surfing is the legendary Laird Hamilton, who, with a group of friends in Hawaii, figured out how to board suicidally large waves of 70 and 80 feet. Casey follows this unique tribe of people as they seek to conquer the holy grail of their sport, a 100-foot wave. In this mesmerizing account, the exploits of Hamilton and his fellow surfers are juxtaposed against scientists' urgent efforts to understand the destructive powers of waves--from the tsunami that wiped out 250,000 people in the Pacific in 2004 to the 1,740-foot-wave that recently leveled part of the Alaskan coast. Like Jon Krakauer's Into Thin Air, The Wave brilliantly portrays human beings confronting nature at its most ferocious.

The Wave of the Sea Wolf

by David Wisniewski

From the book: In a coastal bay in the land of the Tlingit, huge waves arise without warning, engulfing even the largest war canoe in an instant. The young Tlingit princess Kchokeen knows that a spirit called Gonakadet, the Sea-Wolf, lives in these waters, and wonders if it is responsible for the destructive waves. Kchokeen also knows that wealth and honor come to those who see Gonakadet. But when an adventure near the bay concludes with a vision of the Sea-Wolf, the gifts she receives are unexpected, and make her the instrument of profound changes in the destiny of her people. The Pacific Northwest is the setting for this dramatic original story, which draws on Tlingit myth as well as accounts of the Tlingit's first contacts with European adventurers. In addition to the beautifully told story, the book includes a short history of the area where these Indians live. This is a fine book for a school report. Picture descriptions are included.

Wave-Swept Shore: The Rigors of Life on a Rocky Coast

by Mimi Koehl

This book tells the story of one stretch along the Pacific coast of North America--introducing the mussels, limpets, crabs, grasses, starfish, kelp, and other animals and plants that live there, and explaining how they function and flourish in an environment of waves, sand, and rocks.

Waves

by Fredric Raichlen

Sitting on the beach on a sunny summer day, we enjoy the steady advance and retreat of the waves. In the water, enthusiastic waders jump and shriek with pleasure when a wave hits them. But where do these waves come from? How are they formed and why do they break on the shore? In Waves, Fredric Raichlen traces the evolution of waves, from their generation in the deep ocean to their effects on the coast. He explains, in a way that is readily understandable to nonscientists, both the science of waves themselves and the technology that can be used to protect us against their more extreme forms, including hurricanes and tsunamis. After offering a basic definition of waves and explaining the mechanics of wind-wave generation, Raichlen describes how waves travel, how they shoal (rise), how they break, and how they transform in other ways. He goes on to describe, among other things, the complicated sun-Earth-moon combinations that create astronomical tides (the high and low tides that occur daily and predictably); the effects of waves on the beach, including rip currents and beach erosion, and on harbors and shipping; and the building of breakwaters to protect harbors and bays. He discusses hurricanes, storm surges, and hurricane-generated waves. He offers a brief history of tsunamis, including Sumatra's in 2004 and Japan's in 2011, and explains the mechanisms that generate them (including earthquakes, landslides, and volcanoes). Waves can be little ripples that lap peacefully at the shore or monstrous tsunamis that destroy everything in their paths. Describing the science underlying this astonishing variety, Waves offers a different kind of beach reading.

Waves

by Herbert S. Zim

This book talks about anything you ever wanted to know about waves, from how they are formed, explaining simple vocabulary about waves, how they travel across the oceans, how they can be destructive, and how they can be useful too. Although this book was published in 1967 I found it had some excellent information on a topic not often talked about, Ocean waves. Good read in my opinion.

The Way Out: A True Story of Ruin and Survival

by Craig Childs

A breakout book from a writer increasingly celebrated as the 21st-century bard of the American Southwest--a writer in the tradition of Barry Lopez, Peter Matthiessen, Terry Tempest Williams, among others. In March 2003, Craig Childs received the Spirit of the West Literary Achievement Award, given to a writer whose body of work captures the unique spirit of the American West. As a chronicle of adventure, as emotionally charged human drama, as confessional memoir, The Way Out is a transcendent book, a work destined to earn a lasting place in the literature of extremes. Not since John Krakauer's bestselling Into the Wild has a book so compellingly explored the boundary between wilderness adventure and madness.

The Way the Wind Blows: Climate, History, and Human Action

by Joseph A. Tainter Susan Keech Mcintosh Roderick J. Mcintosh

Scientists and policymakers are beginning to understand in ever-increasing detail that environmental problems cannot be understood solely through the biophysical sciences. Environmental issues are fundamentally human issues and must be set in the context of social, political, cultural, and economic knowledge. The need both to understand how human beings in the past responded to climatic and other environmental changes and to synthesize the implications of these historical patterns for present-day sustainability spurred a conference of the world's leading scholars on the topic. The Way the Wind Blows is the rich result of that conference. Articles discuss the dynamics of climate, human perceptions of and responses to the environment, and issues of sustainability and resiliency. These themes are illustrated through discussions of human societies around the world and throughout history.

The Way the Wind Blows: Climate, History, and Human Action

by Joseph A. Tainter Susan Keech Mcintosh Roderick J. Mcintosh

Scientists and policymakers are beginning to understand in ever-increasing detail that environmental problems cannot be understood solely through the biophysical sciences. Environmental issues are fundamentally human issues and must be set in the context of social, political, cultural, and economic knowledge. The need both to understand how human beings in the past responded to climatic and other environmental changes and to synthesize the implications of these historical patterns for present-day sustainability spurred a conference of the world's leading scholars on the topic. The Way the Wind Blows is the rich result of that conference. Articles discuss the dynamics of climate, human perceptions of and responses to the environment, and issues of sustainability and resiliency. These themes are illustrated through discussions of human societies around the world and throughout history.

We Took to the Woods

by Louise Dickinson Rich

Mrs. Louise Dickenson Rich lives in very rural Maine in the 1940s. She tells about her life, having to stock up on canned goods for the winter, their fresh meat is when her husband hunts. She tells of her life and loving it, but what happens when she realizes that she is out of touch with life such as technology, life, movies, stores...

Weather and Climate (Young Discoverers)

by Barbara Taylor

This book is an introduction to weather and climate, discussing world climates, seasons, violent weather, weather pollution, and the elements of changing weather.

Weather by the Numbers: The Genesis of Modern Meteorology

by Kristine Harper

Kristine Harper tells the story of the transformation of meteorology from a guessing science into a sophisticated scientific discipline based on physics and mathematics.

Weather (Merit Badge Series)

by Boy Scouts of America

This book introduces scouts to the science of weather.

The Weather of the Future: Heat Waves, Extreme Storms, and Other Scenes from a Climate-changed Planet

by Heidi Cullen

Droughts. Floods. Climate refugees. Global warming isn't just about polar bears anymore. Let's assume we do nothing about climate change. Imagine that we just continue to emit carbon at our current levels or even exceed those levels. How would our weather change? What would our forecast be? Welcome to The Weather of the Future. In this groundbreaking work, Dr. Heidi Cullen, one of the world's foremost climatologists and environmental journalists, puts a vivid face on climate change, offering a new way of seeing this phenomenon not just as an event set to happen in the distant future but as something happening right now in our own backyards. Arguing that we must connect the weather of today with the climate change of tomorrow, Cullen combines the latest research from scientists on the ground with state-of-the-art climate-model projections to create climate-change scenarios for seven of the most at-risk locations around the world. From the Central Valley of California, where coming droughts will jeopardize the entire state's water supply, to Greenland, where warmer temperatures will give access to mineral wealth buried beneath ice sheets for millennia, Cullen illustrates how, if left unabated, climate change will transform every corner of the world by midcentury. What emerges is a mosaic of changing weather patterns that collectively spell out the range of risks posed by global warming-whether it's New York City, whose infrastructure is extremely vulnerable to even a relatively weak category 3 hurricane, or Bangladesh, a country so low-lying that millions of people could become climate refugees due to rising sea levels. Provocative and convincing, The Weather of the Future makes climate change local, showing how no two regions of the country or the world will be affected in quite the same way, and demonstrating that melting ice is just the beginning.

Weather of the San Francisco Bay Region (2nd edition)

by Harold Gilliam

An introduction to the many factors which contribute to the unique weather of the San Francisco Bay region.

Weather Words and What They Mean

by Gail Gibbons

Different words describe different kinds of weather. Find out and learn all the different meanings.

Webs of Life: Saguaro Cactus

by Paul Fleisher

This series offers very young readers a glimpse at the ways in which plants and animals interact and affect one another in a specific community. Each book invites the reader to explore a certain microsystem's environment and the wide variety of creatures that have adapted to life there.

A Week in the Woods

by Andrew Clements

Mark didn't ask to move to New Hampshire. Or to go to a hick school like Hardy Elementary. And he certainly didn't request Mr. Maxwell as his teacher. Mr. Maxwell doesn't like rich kids, or slackers, or know-it-alls. And he's decided that Mark is all of those things. Now the whole school is headed out for a week of camping -- Hardy's famous Week in the Woods. At first it sounds dumb, but then Mark begins to open up to life in the country, and he decides it might be okay to learn something new. It might even be fun. But things go all wrong for Mark. The Week in the Woods is not what anyone planned. Especially not Mr. Maxwell. With his uncanny knack to reach right to the heart of kids, Andrew Clements asks -- and answers -- questions about first impressions, fairness, loyalty, and courage -- and exactly what it takes to spend a Week in the Woods.

Wendy’s Weather Warriors: Hurricane Harry

by Kathryn Lay

Wendy wins an essay contest and gets to take the Weather Warriors and Mr. Andrews to Galveston, Texas, to read her essay about the big 1900 hurricane in Galveston. Now a real tropical storm strikes.

The Western Paradox: A Conservation Reader

by Arthur M. Schlesinger Bernard Devoto Douglas Brinkley Patricia Nelson

This book is the fascinating record of DeVoto's crusade to save the West from itself.

The Whale: In Search of the Giants of the Sea

by Philip Hoare

From his childhood fascination with the gigantic Natural History Museum model of a blue whale to his adult encounters with the living animals in the Atlantic Ocean, the acclaimed writer Philip Hoare has been obsessed with whales. Journeying through human and natural history, The Whale is the result of his voyage of discovery into the heart of this obsession and the book that inspired it: Herman Melville's Moby-Dick. Taking us deep into their domain, Hoare shows us these mysterious creatures as they have never been seen before. Following in Ishmael's footsteps, he explores the troubled history of man and whale; visits the historic whaling locales of New Bedford, Nantucket, and the Azores; and traces the whale's cultural history from Jonah to Free Willy. Winner of the prestigious BBC Samuel Johnson Prize for Non-Fiction, The Whale is an unforgettable and often moving attempt to explain why these strange and beautiful animals still exert such a powerful hold on our imagination.

Whales, Dolphins and Porpoises (Smithsonian Handbook)

by Mark Carwardine

A field guide on whales, dolphins and porpoises, which are elusive creatures, spending a major portion of their lives underwater or in remote areas far out to sea; as a result, they can be extremely difficult to study.

Whales, Whaling, and Ocean Ecosystems

by Terrie M. Williams Douglas P. Demaster Daniel F. Doak Robert L. Brownell Jr. James A. Estes

This unprecedented volume presents a sweeping picture of what we know about the natural history, biology, and ecology of whales in the broad context of the dynamics of ocean ecosystems. Innovative and comprehensive, the volume encompasses multiple points of view to consider the total ecological impact of industrial whaling on the world's oceans. Combining empirical research, ecological theory and modeling, and historical data, its chapters present perspectives from ecology, population biology, physiology, genetics, evolutionary history, ocean biogeography, economics, culture, and law, among other disiplines. Throughout, contributors investigate how whaling fundamentally disrupted ocean ecosystems, examine the various roles whales play in food webs, and discuss the continuing ecological chain reactions to the depletion of these large animals. In addition to reviewing what is known of the current and historic whale populations, Whales, Whaling, and Ocean Ecosystems considers how this knowledge will bear on scientific approaches to conservation and whaling in the future and provocatively asks whether it is possible to restore ocean ecosystems to their pre-whaling condition.

What Fish Don't Want You To Know: An Insider's Guide to Freshwater Fishing

by Frank P. Baron

Expert, field-tested advice for anglers at every level. This comprehensive, entertaining, and foolproof guide covers everything novice and avid anglers need to know to catch freshwater fish--from bass and trout to salmon and walleye--and reveals the two basic ways to catch ALL fish. With numerous photographs and illustrations, easy-to-follow instructions, and a liberal dose of good humor, the author shares his 40 years of angling expertise, including how to read the waters and the weather, select the right baits and lures for particular fish and situations, know which gear is essential and which is merely desirable, get maximum results on a minimum budget, practice proper etiquette and ethics, and to turn a tough day into a great one with dozens of tricks and tips. Laced with amusing anecdotes, this book will unlock the secrets of fishing and teach anglers how to catch more fish.

Showing 1,901 through 1,925 of 2,048 results

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