Browse Results What Format Should I Choose?

Showing 51 through 75 of 1,624 results

American Savage: Insights, Slights, and Fights on Faith, Sex, Love, and Politics

by Dan Savage

On the heels of his Emmy-winning It Gets Better campaign, columnist and provocateur Dan Savage weighs in on such diverse issues as healthcare, gun control, and marriage equality with characteristic straight talk and humor. <P> Dan Savage has always had a loyal audience, thanks to his syndicated sex-advice column "Savage Love," but since the incredible global success of his It Gets Better project-his book of the same name was a New York Times bestseller-his profile has skyrocketed. In addition, he's written for The New York Times, Rolling Stone, The Onion, GQ, The Guardian, Salon. com, and countless other widely read publications. Savage is recognized as someone whose opinions about our culture, politics, and society should not only be listened to but taken seriously. <P> Now, in American Savage, he writes on topics ranging from marriage, parenting, and the gay agenda to the Catholic Church and sex education. .

American Voyeur: Dispatches from the Far Reaches of Modern Life

by Benoit Denizet-Lewis

BENOIT DENIZET-LEWIS, one of the most perceptive and interesting journalists writing today, takes us into some unusual precincts of American society in American Voyeur. Denizet-Lewis made news with his New York Times Magazine cover story "Double Lives on the Down Low," included here, which ignited a firestorm by revealing a subculture of African-American men who have sex with other men but who don't consider themselves gay. In American Voyeur, he also takes us inside a summer camp for pro-life teenagers, a New Hampshire town where two young brothers committed suicide, a social group for lipstick lesbians, a middle school where a girl secretly lives as a boy, a college where fraternity boys face the daunting prospect of sobriety, a state where legally married young gay men are turning out to be more like their parents than anyone might have suspected, a high school where dating has been replaced by "hooking up," and other intersections of youth culture and sexuality. Peer behind the curtain of modern American life with this remarkable collection.

The American Woman in the Chinese Hat

by Carole Maso

Carole Maso's stunning, erotic fourth novel chronicles the dark, irresistible adventures of an American writer named Catherine who has come to France to live. Set into motion by a single act of abandonment-Catherine's lover of ten years has left her-she falls deeper and deeper into an irretrievable madness. With passionate abandon and detachment Catherine pursues her own destruction. Forcing the boundaries of identity and the limits of her eroticism, she enters a series of blinding sexual encounters with a poet, a fascist, a young Arlesian woman, a fireman, and three thieves. Eerily she splits herself in two so that she is both the one who watches and the one who is watched, creator and creation, author and character, as she observes herself from afar "And I would like to help her", the one who watches says, "but I can't". Finally she meets Lucien, the solitary, cynical, beautiful man with long hair who looks as though he has "stepped out of an unmade film by the dead Truffaut", and through this mysterious, doomed, bittersweet liaison Catherine makes one last attempt to halt her decline through the redemptive act of story-telling. She begins to invent the story of their lives, telling it to him half in English, half in French, joining their solitudes for a moment before losing forever her belief that the shapely, hopeful prospects of narrative make sense of experience. "She notices how everything is given up or taken away" as she loses the power of the imagination or memory or the body to console, and finally of language to convey meaning. This mesmerizing drama of sex, betrayal, and dissolution with its shattering inevitable conclusion is played out against the dazzling backdrop of the beautiful, indifferent Cote d'Azur in summer. Written in a dwindling lexicon with a simple, warped musicality, The American Woman in the Chinese Hat is a dark, uncompromising, seductive work of art.

Among Women: From the Homosocial to the Homoerotic in the Ancient World

by Lisa Auanger Nancy Sorkin Rabinowitz

Women's and men's worlds were largely separate in ancient Mediterranean societies, and, in consequence, many women's deepest personal relationships were with other women. Yet relatively little scholarly or popular attention has focused on women's relationships in antiquity, in contrast to recent interest in the relationships between men in ancient Greece and Rome. The essays in this book seek to close this gap by exploring a wide variety of textual and archaeological evidence for women's homosocial and homoerotic relationships from prehistoric Greece to fifth-century CE Egypt.<P> Drawing on developments in feminist theory, gay and lesbian studies, and queer theory, as well as traditional textual and art historical methods, the contributors to this volume examine representations of women's lives with other women, their friendships, and sexual subjectivity. They present new interpretations of the evidence offered by the literary works of Sappho, Ovid, and Lucian; Bronze Age frescoes and Greek vase painting, funerary reliefs, and other artistic representations; and Egyptian legal documents.

And Say Hi To Joyce: America's First Gay Column Comes Out

by Joyce Murdoch Deb Price

History and excerpts from the newspaper column.

And Tango Makes Three

by Peter Parnell Justin Richardson

True story: Two male penguins fell in love and became a couple. They followed all the egg rituals they saw around them but didn't get a baby. A zookeeper gave them another penguin's egg and they incubated it and raised it as their own baby. The story is wonderful. The authors' notes at the end give many more details of the true story. This is an excellent book for a book report.

And Then They Were Nuns

by Susan J. Leonardi

Novel about the interwoven lives of an unforgettable group of nuns living in a secluded community.

And You Invited Me In

by Cheryl Moss Tyler

When Alex Marshall left his stifling small town behind, he felt freedom for the first time in his life. Rejected by his conservative Christian hometown for his homosexuality, Alex becomes a successful lawyer, active in the gay community and committed to his partner, Scott. But tragedy strikes in the form of AIDS, as it rips away Alex's dignity and crushes his body. He is near the end of his life. Annie Whitley, Alex's sister, is faced with a difficult choice when a call from Alex comes out of the blue. Should she travel to care for her estranged brother -- who represents the lifestyle she's been taught to hate and fear -- or stay away, deny him, and follow what the town demands? Choosing Alex, she begins to see how her decision impacts the entire community. And You Invited Me In addresses the moral dilemma that many face: how can people accept or even tolerate a way of life so different from anything they have been taught to believe is acceptable? This interwoven tale speaks of love, compassion, and true belief, as a family reconciles and a town comes to understand the truth of its faith, and is resonant with the hymn of equality. For I was hungry and you gave me something to eat, I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink, I was a stranger and you invited me in. -- Matthew 25:35

The Angel and the Perverts

by Lucie Delarue-Mardrus Anna Livia

First published in 1930. Set in the lesbian and gay circles of Paris in the 1920s, The Angel and the Perverts tells the story of a hermaphrodite born to upper class parents in Normandy and ignorant of his/her physical difference. As an adult, s/he lives a double life as Marion/Mario, passing undetected as a lesbian in the literary salons of the times, and as a gay man in the cocaine dens made famous by Colette.

Angel Dance: A Thriller

by Mary F. Beal

Classic lesbian thriller. The narrator, Kat, has been active in radical feminist politics long enough to know how to take care of herself--which is a good thing because her new job, protecting best-selling feminist author, Angel Stone, is going to test every one of her survival skills. Kat is tough, cool and disengaged, except for her passion for Angel Stone. Angel may be the most attractive woman she has ever known, but being around her can only spell danger.

Another Dead Teenager (Paul Turner Mystery #3)

by Mark Richard Zubro

When two suburban high-school students are found murdered--both boys who were well respected and liked, with solid family lives and no apparent enemies--Detective Paul Turner is assigned the case. However, as a gay father with two teenage sons and a new lover in his life, Paul Turner has trouble bringing his full attention to bear on the case. But as details slowly emerge, he begins to suspect that he is investigating something more deadly and horrifying than a pair of senseless killings, something that could threaten the lives of the people he holds most dear.

Another Kind Of Love

by Paula Christian

Unlike most pulp romances of the 1950s and '60s, Paula Christian's heroines were thoroughly modern women--struggling to define themselves while searching for their own lasting relationships. Fully human and honest, afraid of failure yet always hopeful, these sisters were blazing a trail, encouraging others on their path to...<P> Another Kind Of Love<P> The moment Laura Garraway shares a forbidden kiss with beautiful Hollywood starlet Ginny Adams, she discovers the missing piece of herself. When fame-hungry Ginny won't leave her powerful movie star lover, Saundra, Laura runs away to New York's comforting bright lights, desperate to forget her. There, in the cigarette-and-martini-drenched gay bars of the Village, and the offices of Madison Avenue, Laura finds herself in a new world--one in which who she is and what she wants are completely up to her...<P> Love Is Where You Find It

Arabella

by Anonymous

A young woman's sexual adventures in England and Parils in the late 1800's.

An Archive of Feelings: Trauma, Sexuality, and Lesbian Public Cultures

by Ann Cvetkovich

In this bold new work of cultural criticism, Ann Cvetkovich develops a queer approach to trauma. She argues for the importance of recognizing--and archiving--accounts of trauma that belong as much to the ordinary and everyday as to the domain of catastrophe. An Archive of Feelings contends that the field of trauma studies, limited by too strict a division between the public and the private, has overlooked the experiences of women and queers. Rejecting the pathologizing understandings of trauma that permeate medical and clinical discourses on the subject, Cvetkovich develops instead a sex-positive approach missing even from most feminist work on trauma. She challenges the field to engage more fully with sexual trauma and the wide range of feelings in its vicinity, including those associated with butch-femme sex and aids activism and caretaking. An Archive of Feelings brings together oral histories from lesbian activists involved in act up/New York; readings of literature by Dorothy Allison, Leslie Feinberg, Cherre Moraga, and Shani Mootoo; videos by Jean Carlomusto and Pratibha Parmar; and performances by Lisa Kron, Carmelita Tropicana, and the bands Le Tigre and Tribe 8. Cvetkovich reveals how activism, performance, and literature give rise to public cultures that work through trauma and transform the conditions producing it. By looking closely at connections between sexuality, trauma, and the creation of lesbian public cultures, Cvetkovich makes those experiences that have been pushed to the peripheries of trauma culture the defining principles of a new construction of sexual trauma--one in which trauma catalyzes the creation of cultural archives and political communities.

An Archive of Hope: Harvey Milk's Speeches and Writings

by Frank M. Robinson Charles E. Morris III Jason Edward Black Harvey Milk

Harvey Milk was one of the first openly and politically gay public officials in the United States, and his remarkable activism put him at the very heart of a pivotal civil rights movement reshaping America in the 1970s. An Archive of Hope is Milk in his own words, bringing together in one volume a substantial collection of his speeches, columns, editorials, political campaign materials, open letters, and press releases, culled from public archives, newspapers, and personal collections. The volume opens with a foreword from Milk's friend, political advisor, and speech writer Frank Robinson, who remembers the man who "started as a Goldwater Republican and ended his life as the last of the store front politicians" who aimed to "give 'em hope" in his speeches. An illuminating introduction traces GLBTQ politics in San Francisco, situates Milk within that context, and elaborates the significance of his discourse and memories both to 1970s-era gay rights efforts and contemporary GLBTQ worldmaking.

Are the Lips a Grave?

by Lynne Huffer

Lynne Huffer's ambitious inquiry redresses the rift between feminist and queer theory, traversing the space of a new, post-moral sexual ethics that includes pleasure, desire, connection, and betrayal. She begins by balancing queer theorists' politics of sexual freedoms with a moralizing feminist politics that views sexuality as harm. Drawing on the best insights from both traditions, she builds an ethics centered on eros, following Michel Foucault's ethics as a practice of freedom and Luce Irigaray's lyrical articulation of an ethics of sexual difference.Through this theoretical lens, Huffer examines everyday experiences of ethical connection and failure connected to sex, including queer sexual practices, sodomy laws, interracial love, pornography, and work-life balance. Her approach complicates sexual identities while challenging the epistemological foundations of subjectivity. She rethinks ethics "beyond good and evil" without underestimating, as some queer theorists have done, the persistence of what Foucault calls the "catastrophe" of morality. Elaborating a thinking-feeling ethics of the other, Huffer encourages contemporary intellectuals to reshape sexual morality from within, defining an ethical space that is both poetically suggestive and politically relevant, both conceptually daring and grounded in common sexual experience.

Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe

by Benjamin Alire Saenz

A lyrical novel about family and friendship from critically acclaimed author Benjamin Alire Saenz. Aristotle is an angry teen with a brother in prison. Dante is a know-it-all who has an unusual way of looking at the world. When the two meet at the swimming pool, they seem to have nothing in common. But as the loners start spending time together, they discover that they share a special friendship--the kind that changes lives and lasts a lifetime. And it is through this friendship that Ari and Dante will learn the most important truths about themselves and the kind of people they want to be.

The Arizona Kid

by Ron Koertge

Sixteen-year-old Billy spends the summer with his gay uncle in Tucson and works at a racetrack, where he falls in love with an outspoken horse exerciser named Cara Mae.

Army of Lovers

by Sarah Liss

Will Munro was a legendary artist, DJ, activist and impresario, as renowned for his transgressive, irreverent art as he was for reinventing Toronto's nightlife culture. His installations and prints co-opted rock 'n' roll imagery and raunchy gay iconography - you couldn't look at men's underwear the same way after a Munro show - and his outre Vazaleen dance parties brought to the city's stages some of the most notorious performers of the last forty years: Nina Hagen, Jayne County and Vaginal Davis, among them. When Munro died of brain cancer in 2010, at the unfathomably young age of thirty-five, Toronto was robbed of one of its most significant civic heroes. Army of Lovers collects stories from and about the people who knew and loved Munro - including Gossip singer Beth Ditto, filmmaker Bruce LaBruce and artist Luis Jacob - to movingly capture an incandescent moment when Toronto's queer community, art scene and independent music universe came of age and collided with one another.

Aroused

by Sean Wolfe

Sean Wolfe Has A Reputation. . . . . .for writing some of the steamiest, smartest erotica between two covers. Now, the author of the wildly popular Close Contact is back with another collection of stories as literate as they are provocative, written with a voyeuristic intimacy that recalls a XXX-rated Christopher Isherwood. Reflecting the sexual seasons of a gay man's life--spring, summer, fall, and winter--there is something here for every man. . .stories of newfound eroticism as charged as it gets; of men on quests for their deepest desires and sexual selves; of couples looking to keep their sex lives alive and exciting; and of older men fearlessly redefining sensuality. Step inside and discover. . . A magical gift card that grants a lucky birthday boy three of his deepest, hottest wishes. A substitute teacher who gives a cocky young student private instruction in a bathroom stall. One hot card game between five college buddies that brings all new meaning to "five-card stud." And in one delicious novella, a high-priced call boy experiences everything he can in search of that most elusive high--true love. . . Confessional. Personal. Deeply erotic. And 100% hot. These twenty-one stories prove that when it comes to hot sex, intense pleasure, wicked fantasy, and deep desire, it's always the right season. . .

Arroyo

by Summer Wood

Art on Fire

by Hilary Sloin

Art on Fire is the apparent biography of subversive painter Francesca deSilva, the founding foremother of "pseudorealism," who lived hard and died young. But in the tradition of Vladimir Nabokov's acclaimed novel Pale Fire, it's a fiction from start to finish. It opens with Francesca's early life. We learn about her childhood love, the chess genius Lisa Sinsong, as well as her rivalry with her brilliant sister Isabella, who publishes an acclaimed volume of poetry at the age of twelve. She compensates for the failings of her less than attentive parents by turning to her grandmother who is loyal and adoring until she learns Francesca is a lesbian, when she rejects her. Francesca flees to a ramshackle cabin in Wellfleet, Massachusetts, working weekends at the flea market. She breaks into the gloomy basement of a house, where she begins her life as a painter. Much to her confusion and even dismay, fame comes quickly. Interspersed with Francesca's narrative are thirteen critical "essays" on the paintings of Francesca deSilva by critics, academics, and psychologists-essays that are razor-sharp satires on art, lesbian life, and the academic world, puncturing pretentiousness with every paragraph. Art on Fire is a darkly comic, pitch-perfect, and fearless satire on the very art of biography itself. Art on Fire is the latest winner of the Bywater Prize for Fiction and was a finalist for the Heekin Foundation Award, the Dana Awards, and the Story Oaks Prize. It was mistakenly awarded the nonfiction prize in the Amherst Book and Plow Competition.

As Meat Loves Salt

by Maria Mccann

In the seventeenth century, the English Revolution is under way. The nation, with religious and political discontent, has erupted into violence and terror. Jacob Cullen and his fellow soldiers dream of rebuilding their lives when the fighting is over.

As Nature Made Him: The Boy Who Was Raised as a Girl

by John Colapinto

Brian and Bruce Reimer were born as normal identical twin boys. At 8 months of age, they developed a urinary problem, which their Winnipeg hospital said could be easily cured via circumcision. The day they were scheduled for that, a doctor who did not normally do this procedure was in charge. As a result, Bruce lost his penis altogether. Dr. John Money of Johns Hopkins Hospital, who had been treating intersexed babies by genital surgery, saw this as the perfect empirical study of nurture over nature. These were developmentally-normal identical twin boys. Following this, Bruce was castrated, his name changed to Brenda and he was raised as a girl. However, Brenda's personality did not conform, no matter how much the family and others tried to nurture the child as a girl. Neither twin was told of their background. In their early teens, Brenda rebelled. Eventually, she was told the truth and felt "normal", she was indeed the boy she had always felt internally. She changed her name to David, as one who slew the incomparably-sized Goliath. The rest of the book tells how David's life developed from there forward to adulthood, marriage, and fatherhood. It also covers Dr. Money's cover-up of the study results as not the positive picture he had reported consistently over the years, and details his downfall in the medical profession. Of note, is that the study, which was reported as successful nurture over nature, was constantly used in feminist rhetoric at the time about gender roles. Money was also an early co-founder of the Gender Identity Clinic at Johns Hopkins, involved with transsexual procedures. The author began this investigation for a Rolling Stone magazine article. Later, David Reimer decided to let his story become public for the education of others, and asked Colapinto to do the writing. There are three vulgar sex terms, minor description of pornographic pictures used by the doctor, and a few uses of the word "God."

Ash

by Malinda Lo

In the wake of her father's death, Ash is left at the mercy of her cruel stepmother. Consumed with grief, her only joy comes by the light of the dying hearth fire, rereading the fairy tales her mother once told her. In her dreams, someday the fairies will steal her away, as they are said to do. When she meets the dark and dangerous fairy Sidhean, she believes that her wish may be granted. The day that Ash meets Kaisa, the King's Huntress, her heart begins to change. Instead of chasing fairies, Ash learns to hunt with Kaisa. Though their friendship is as delicate as a new bloom, it reawakens Ash's capacity for love-and her desire to live. But Sidhean has already claimed Ash for his own, and she must make a choice between fairy tale dreams and true love. Entrancing, empowering, and romantic, Ash is about the connection between life and love, and solitude and death, where transformation can come from even the deepest grief..

Showing 51 through 75 of 1,624 results

Help

Select your format based upon: 1) how you want to read your book, and 2) compatibility with your reading tool. To learn more about using Bookshare with your device, visit the "Using Bookshare" page in the Help Center.

Here is an overview of the specialized formats that Bookshare offers its members with links that go to the Help Center for more information.

  • Bookshare Web Reader - a customized reading tool for Bookshare members offering all the features of DAISY with a single click of the "Read Now" link.
  • DAISY (Digital Accessible Information System) - a digital book file format. DAISY books from Bookshare are DAISY 3.0 text files that work with just about every type of access technology that reads text. Books that contain images will have the download option of ‘DAISY Text with Images’.
  • BRF (Braille Refreshable Format) - digital Braille for use with refreshable Braille devices and Braille embossers.
  • MP3 (Mpeg audio layer 3) - Provides audio only with no text. These books are created with a text-to-speech engine and spoken by Kendra, a high quality synthetic voice from Ivona. Any device that supports MP3 playback is compatible.
  • DAISY Audio - Similar to the Daisy 3.0 option above; however, this option uses MP3 files created with our text-to-speech engine that utilizes Ivona's Kendra voice. This format will work with Daisy Audio compatible players such as Victor Reader Stream and Read2Go.