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Showing 751 through 775 of 1,624 results

Just A Mom

by Betty Degeneres

The mother of comedian Ellen DeGeneres explains ways parents can help themselves and their homosexual children to deal with homosexuality.

Kamikaze Lust

by Lauren Sanders

A female reporter in New York experiments with sex with a female colleague and a male porn star while following stories on assisted suicide and porn videos, going on strike, and dealing with her mother's illness.

KC, at Bat

by Tom Mendicino

Charlie Beresford would rather be doing anything this summer than hauling furniture for a moving company. Come September, he'll be leaving for college, away from the awkwardness of Augustinian Academy, away from his father's constant hints about prospective girlfriends.Then Kevin Conroy--the Mighty KC--joins the moving crew. A star baseball player bound for the big leagues, Charlie is shocked when cool, confident KC suggests hanging out, especially when KC asks him to stay over--and the happiness their connection brings Charlie.But the summer is changing Charlie--putting muscles on his skinny frame, compelling him to face hard truths, showing him how it feels not just to lose your heart but to break someone else's. Funny, sweet, and moving, Tom Mendicino's insightful coming-of-age story perfectly evokes that moment when you stop living life from the safety of the bleachers--and finally step up to home plate.Praise for Tom Mendicino's Probation"Thoughtful, textured and poignant. . .an exciting impressive debut." --Time Out NY"A smart, engaging, witty, sad and unusual book about the complicated nature of family and love." --Bart Yates

Keeping You a Secret

by Julie Anne Peters

First time I saw her was in the mirror on my locker door. I'd kicked my swim gear onto the bottom shelf and was reaching to the top for my calc book when she opened her locker across the hall. She had a streaked blond ponytail dangling out the back of her baseball cap.... We slammed our lockers in unison and turned. Her eyes met mine. "Hi," she said, smiling. My stomach fluttered. "Hi," I answered automatically. She was new. Had to be. I would've noticed her. She sauntered away, but not before I caught a glimpse of her T-shirt. It said: IMRU? Am I what?

The Kid: What Happened After My Boyfriend and I Decided to Go Get Pregnant

by Dan Savage

This is the story of Dan and his boyfriend Terry's bid to adopt a baby. Dan and Terry decide on open adoption - a radical new form of adoption where the mother chooses the parents of her child. Their gay friends think they are sell-outs; those on the far-right think they are sinners, but all Dan can think about are the (various) joys of parenthood. A no-holds barred attack on the "conservative values", "The Kid" is also a celebration of family, and the lengths people will go - gay and straight - to create one of their own.

King and King

by Stern Nijland Linda De Haan

When the queen insists that the prince get married and take over as king, the search for a suitable mate does not turn out as expected.

Kiss The Girls and Make Them Spy: An Original Jane Bond Parody

by Mabel Maney

Sometimes the Best Bond for a Job is a Jane ... Jane Bond. "What's the story on Bond?" "Your man is a homicidal depressive paranoiac," the doctor reported. "I know that. I want to know what's wrong with him! And be straight with me, man. No medical mumbo jumbo." "He's lost his nerve." N. had suspected as much. After a long while spent staring at the jagged skyline of London, N. came to a decision. He had no other choice but to go through with Pumpernickel's ridiculous plan. Enter Bond, Jane Bond, James's lesbian twin sister and haoless bookstore employee, who steps in to masquerade as her brother at an awards ceremony with the queen. But when the dastardly Sons of Britain (S.O.B.s), a nefarious fraternity plotting to bring the Duke and Duchess of Windsor back to power, show up, it's up to some unexpected heros to save the day. The Powder Puff Girls -- makeup salespersons by day, secret agents by night -- step in to secure the future of Britain while Jane keeps her brother's reputation intact...both in and out of the bedroom!

The Kiss That Counted

by Karin Kallmaker

Golden Crown and Lambda Literary award-winning author Kallmaker presents this tale of two women, two outlooks, and two futures trying to become one.

Kissing Kate

by Lauren Myracle

When you've been best friends for four years, when you finish each other's sentences, laugh at the same jokes, and share a secret cure for hiccups, what could ever come between you? A kiss. Lissa and Kate had spent almost every day together since they were twelve. But then one night last summer, Kate leaned in to kiss Lissa, and Lissa kissed her back. Now Kate is pretending that her friend doesn't exist, and it is Lissa who needs a secret cure for her feelings and confusion. With the help of a book on lucid dreaming, a flaky new friend who claims to be an alien abductee, and her own keen sense of humor, Lissa discovers that there isn't a cure for life-and that sometimes falling in love with the wrong person is the only way to find your footing.

Knowing When to Stop

by Ned Rorem

A thrilling, poignant, and bold memoir of the early years and accomplishments--both musical and sexual--of renowned contemporary composer Ned Rorem<P> Ned Rorem, arguably the greatest composer of art songs that America has produced in more than a hundred years, is also revered as a diarist and essayist whose unexpurgated writings are at once enthralling, enlightening, and provocative. In Knowing When to Stop, one of the most creative American artists of our time offers readers a colorful narrative of his first twenty-seven years, expertly unraveling the intriguing conundrum of who he truly is and how he came to be that way. As the author himself writes, "A memoir is not a diary. Diaries are written in the heat of battle, memoirs in the repose of retrospect." But careful thought and consideration have not dulled the sharp point of Rorem's pen as he writes openly of his life and loves, his missteps and triumphs, and offers frank and fascinating portraits of the luminaries in his circle: Aaron Copland, Truman Capote, Jean Cocteau, Martha Graham, Igor Stravinsky, Billie Holliday, Paul Bowles, and Alfred C. Kinsey, to name a few. The result is an early life story that is riveting, moving, and intimate--a magnificent self-portrait of one of the great minds of this age.

The Ladies

by Doris Grumbach

Lady Eleanor Butler and Sarah Ponsonby, Irish recluses known as the "Ladies of Llangollen," spent most of their adult lives in seclusion in their home in Wales in the late 1700s. This is the story of their relationship.

Ladies Almanack

by Djuna Barnes

First published in 1928, the Almanack is a satirical portrait of Natalie Clifford Barney and her circle, including Romaine Brooks, Radclyffe Hall, Una Troubridge, Dolly Wilde, Janet Flanner, and Solita Solano, among others. Written at a time when The Well of Loneliness took an apologetic and modest tone toward the subject of lesbians, the Almanack tackles it with frank glee. Enhanced by an authoritative introduction by Susan Sniader Lanser, Barnes's biting satire should delight new readers and remind Barnes's many fans how cunning and enthralling a work Ladies Almanack is.

The Laramie Project

by Moises Kaufman

On October 7, 1998, a young gay man was discovered bound to a fence in the hills outside Laramie, Wyoming, savagely beaten and left to die in an act of hate that shocked the nation. Matthew Shepard's death became a national symbol of intolerance, but for the people of Laramie the event was deeply personal, and it's they we hear in this stunningly effective theater piece, a deeply complex portrait of a community.

The Laramie Project and The Laramie Project: Ten Years Later

by Moises Kaufman Andy Paris Tectonic Theater Project Greg Pierotti Leigh Fondakowski

On October 7, 1998, a young gay man was discovered bound to a fence outside Laramie, Wyoming, savagely beaten and left to die in an act of brutality and hate that shocked the nation. Matthew Shepard's death became a national symbol of intolerance, but for the people of the town, the event was deeply personal. In the aftermath, Moisés Kaufman and members of the Tectonic Theater Project went to Laramie and conducted more than 200 interviews with its citizens. From the transcripts, the playwrights constructed an extraordinary chronicle of life in the town after the murder. Since its premiere, The Laramie Project has become a modern classic and one of the most-performed theater pieces in America. <P> Now, in this expanded edition, The Laramie Project: Ten Years Later adds an essential sequel to the original work. Revisiting the town a decade after the tragedy, the troupe finds a community grappling with its legacy and its place in history. The two plays together comprise an epic and deeply moving theatrical cycle that explores the life of an American town over the course a decade.

Last Call

by Baxter Clare

Fourth in Detective L.A. Franco series; lesbian detective.

Last Car to Annwn Station

by Michael Merriam

"The fare is ten cents, miss." Mae Malveaux, an attorney with Minneapolis Child Protective Services, is burnt-out, tired and frustrated. Passing on an invite from Jill, her flirtatious coworker, Mae just wants a quiet night in. Leaving the office late, she's surprised to find the Heritage Line streetcars up and running and hops aboard, eager for a quick trip home. But this is no ordinary streetcar. Death is one of its riders, and Mae is thrust into Annwn, a realm of magic and danger. "Your transfer, miss. You'll need that." Mae's life is turned upside down as human and fae worlds collide. Her budding relationship with Jill takes a perilous turn when they are hunted by mythical beasts, and Mae is drawn into a deadly power struggle. With Jill at her side, Mae must straddle both worlds and fight a war she barely comprehends, for not only does the fate of Annwn rest in her hands, but the lives of both a human and fae child...81,000 words

The Last Deployment: How a Gay, Hammer-Swinging Twentysomething Survived a Year in Iraq

by Bronson Lemer

In 2003, after serving five and a half years as a carpenter in a North Dakota National Guard engineer unit, Bronson Lemer was ready to leave the military behind. But six months short of completing his commitment to the army, Lemer was deployed on a yearlong tour of duty to Iraq. Leaving college life behind in the Midwest, he yearns for a lost love and quietly dreams of a future as an openly gay man outside the military. He discovers that his father's lifelong example of silent strength has taught him much about being a man, and these lessons help him survive in a war zone and to conceal his sexuality, as he is required to do by the U.S. military. The Last Deployment is a moving, provocative chronicle of one soldier's struggle to reconcile military brotherhood with self-acceptance. Lemer captures the absurd nuances of a soldier's daily life: growing a mustache to disguise his fear, wearing pantyhose to battle sand fleas, and exchanging barbs with Iraqis while driving through Baghdad. But most strikingly, he describes the poignant reality faced by gay servicemen and servicewomen, who must mask their identities while serving a country that disowns them. Often funny, sometimes anguished, The Last Deployment paints a deeply personal portrait of war in the twenty-first century.

The Last Nude

by Ellis Avery

Inspired by real events in Art Deco painter Tamara de Lempicka's history, "The Last Nude" is a tour de force of historical imagination. Avery gives the reader a tantalizing window into a lost Paris, an age already vanishing as the inexorable forces of history close in on two tangled lives.

Last Summer

by Michael Thomas Ford

Michael Thomas Ford delivers a triumphant first novel about a group of gay men looking for love, losing the past, and finding themselves in the bars and on the beaches of Provincetown. Josh Felling has always been a romantic--up until the moment his lover Doug announced that he'd had an affair with a guy from their gym. Now, with his life playing out like a very bad movie of the week, Josh impulsively heads to the Cape for a few days--long enough to figure out where his relationship--what's left of it--might be going. But the summer has other plans for Josh, and his trip to P-town will bring bigger changes than he ever imagined. With its windswept dunes, lazy summer days, and starry nights filled with possibilities, Provincetown holds special appeal for those who call it home. . .and for those who come seeking its open welcome. People like Reilly Brennan, son of an old P-town family, whose days are caught up in wedding plans, even as his nights are increasingly taken over by heated fantasies about other men. . .Wide-eyed, blond-haired, All-American Toby Evans, an escapee from the Midwest ready to spend the summer in the equivalent of gay boot camp for anyone who will tutor him. . .Elegant Emmeline, age unknown, a southern belle straight out of Faulkner, with a mean drag act and almost enough money for her permanent gender transformation. . .Ty Rusk, one of Hollywood's hottest new stars hiding an ages-old secrets about to explode. Weaving in and out of these and other lives like the concierge of a Grand Hotel, Josh is in for the summer of his life, a time of turning points and bridges burned, of second chances and new beginnings, of renewal and hope that will bring him closer to becoming the man he needs to be. "This is a cut above more mainstream gay fiction offerings, thanks to Ford's crisp prose and snappy, contemporary dialogue. . ..the sandy, barefoot-friendly setting morphs all the melodrama into a satisfying beach book--and a pleasant fiction debut for Ford."--Publishers Weekly

Last Watch of the Night

by Paul Monette

Tender and passionate autobiographical essays by National Book Award winner Paul Monette<P> "Does it go too fast?" Monette asks about life at the beginning of one piece. The answer is a resounding "yes" for the individuals who populate this stunning work of nonfiction. These ten autobiographical essays memorialize those whose lives have been claimed by AIDS. Following Becoming a Man and Borrowed Time, Last Watch of the Night is Monette's third and final self-portrait. In this collection, he confronts death--those of lovers and friends, and even his own eventual demise--with both bravery and compassion.<P> This ebook features an illustrated biography of Paul Monette including rare images and never-before-seen documents from the Paul Monette papers of the UCLA Library Special Collections.

The Latecomer

by Sarah Aldridge

Lesbian romance.

The Later Diaries of Ned Rorem

by Ned Rorem

The esteemed American composer and unabashed diarist Ned Rorem provides a fascinating, brazenly intimate first-person account of his life and career during one of the most extraordinary decades of the twentieth century <P> Ned Rorem is often considered an American treasure, one of the greatest contemporary composers in the US. In 1966, he revealed another side of his remarkable talent when The Paris Diary was published, and a year later, The New York Diary, both to wide critical acclaim. In The Later Diaries,Rorem continues to explore his world and his music in intimate journal form, covering the years 1961 to 1972, one of his most artistically productive decades. The Ned Rorem revealed in The Later Diaries is somewhat more mature and worldly than the young artist of the earlier works, but no less candid or daring, as he reflects on his astonishing life, loves, friendships, and rivalries during an epoch of staggering, sometimes volatile change. Writing with intelligence, insight, and honesty, he recalls time spent with some of the most famous, and infamous, artists of the era--Philip Roth, Christopher Isherwood, Tallulah Bankhead, and Edward Albee, among others--openly exploring his sexuality and his art while offering fascinating, sometimes blistering, views on the art of his contemporaries.

Law of Desire: A Queer Film Classic

by José Quiroga

Law of Desire, one of three inaugural titles in Arsenal Pulp Press' new film book series Queer Film Classics, focuses on the 1987 homoerotic melodrama by Pedro Almodóvar, Spain's most successful contemporary film director.<P> The film Law of Desire is a grand tale of love, lust, and amnesia featuring three main characters: a gay film director (played by Eusebio Poncela); his sister, an actress who was once his brother (Carmen Maura); and a repressed, obsessive stalker (a young Antonio Banderas). In the twenty-plus years since its first release, Law of Desire has been acknowledged as redefining the way in which cinema can portray the difficult affective relationships between homosexuality, gender, and sex. Taking his cue from the golden age of Latin American, American, and European melodrama, Almodóvar created a sentimental yet hard-edged film that believes in the utopian possibilities for new relationships that redeem people from their despair. Since its release, Almodóvar has become an Oscar-winning filmmaker who regularly delves into issues of sexuality, gender, and identity.<P> This book examines the political and social context in which Almodóvar created Law of Desire, as well as its impact on LGBT cinema both in Europe and around the world.

Lawfully Wedded Husband: How My Gay Marriage Will Save the American Family

by Joel Derfner

When Joel Derfner's boyfriend proposed to him, there was nowhere in America the two could legally marry. That changed quickly, however, and before long the two were on what they expected to be a rollicking journey to married bliss. What they didn't realize was that, along the way, they would confront not just the dilemmas every couple faces on the way to the altar--what kind of ceremony would they have? what would they wear? did they have to invite Great Aunt Sophie?--but also questions about what a relationship can and can't do, the definition of marriage, and, ultimately, what makes a family. <P> Add to the mix a reality show whose director forces them to keep signing and notarizing applications for a wedding license until the cameraman gets a shot she likes; a family marriage history that includes adulterers, arms smugglers, and poisoners; and discussions of civil rights, Sophocles, racism, grammar, and homemade Ouija boards--coupled with Derfner's gift for getting in his own way--and what results is a story not just of gay marriage and the American family but of what it means to be human.

Learning to Be an Anthropologist and Remaining "Native"

by Beatrice Medicine

Native American anthropologist considers many aspects of life on various Sioux reservations

Showing 751 through 775 of 1,624 results

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