Browse Results What Download Format Should I Choose?

Showing 40,026 through 40,050 of 73,627 results

Affirming the Resurrection of the Incarnate Christ

by Matthew D. Jensen

The first letter of John is commonly understood to contain no reference to Jesus's resurrection. Matthew D. Jensen argues that, far from this being absent from the theology of 1 John, the opening verses contain a key reference to the resurrection which undergirds the rest of the text and is bolstered by other explicit references to the resurrection. The book goes on to suggest that the author and the readers of this epistle understand themselves to be the authentic Israel from which faithless Jews had apostatized when they denied that Jesus was 'the Christ' and left the community. Jensen's interpretation calls for a new understanding of the historical context in which 1 John was written, particularly the question of Jesus' identity from the perspective of his fellow Jews. An innovative and provocative study, of interest to scholars and advanced students of New Testament studies, Johannine theology and Jewish history.

Faith Misplaced

by Ussama Makdisi

In this riveting account of U. S. -Arab relations, award-winning author Ussama Makdisi explores why Arabs once had a favorable view of America and why they no longer do. Firmly rejecting the spurious notion of a civilizational clash between Islam and the West, Makdisi instead demonstrates how an initial zealous American missionary crusade was transformed across the nineteenth-century into a leading American educational presence in the Arab world, and how the advent of the idea of Wilsonian self-determination, amidst wide-scale Arab emigration to the United States, further bolstered a positive, foundational Arab idea of America. However, a series of subsequent political turning points-beginning with the British and French colonial partition of the Arab world in 1920 and culminating in the U. S. -backed creation of Israel in 1948 at the expense of the Palestinians-systematically alienated Arabs from America. Drawing on both American and Arab sources, Makdisi brings to the fore for the first time a wide range of hitherto marginalized Arab perspectives on their multifaceted cultural and political encounters with America. Unearthing this neglected history puts current politics and Arab attitudes toward the United States in a crucial historical perspective. By tracing how American missionaries laid the basis for an initial Arab discovery of America, and then how later U. S. policy decisions fueled anti-Americanism, Makdisi tells a powerful historical tale brimming with contemporary relevance.

Financing the 2008 Election

by Anthony Corrado David B. Magleby

The 2008 elections were by any standard historic. The nation elected its first African American president, and the Republicans nominated their first female candidate for vice president. More money was raised and spent on federal contests than in any election in U.S. history. Barack Obama raised a record-setting $745 million for his campaign and federal candidates, party committees, and interest groups also raised and spent record-setting amounts. Moreover, the way money was raised by some candidates and party committees has the potential to transform American politics for years to come.The latest installment in a series that dates back half a century, Financing the 2008 Election is the definitive analysis of how campaign finance and spending shaped the historic presidential and congressional races of 2008. It explains why these records were set and what it means for the future of U.S. politics. David Magleby and Anthony Corrado have assembled a team of experts who join them in exploring the financing of the 2008 presidential and congressional elections. They provide insights into the political parties and interest groups that made campaign finance history and summarize important legal and regulatory changes that affected these elections. Contributors: Allan Cigler (University of Kansas), Stephanie Perry Curtis (Brigham Young University), John C. Green (Bliss Institute at the University of Akron), Paul S. Herrnson (University of Maryland), Diana Kingsbury (Bliss Institute at the University of Akron), Thomas E. Mann (Brookings Institution).

Deadly Embrace

by Bruce O. Riedel

Pakistan and America have been gripped together in a deadly embrace for decades. For half a century American presidents from both parties pursued narrow short-term interests in Pakistan. This myopia actually backfired in the long term, helping to destabilize the political landscape and radicalizing the population, setting the stage for the global jihad we face today.Bruce Riedel, one of America's foremost authorities on U.S. security and South Asia, sketches the history of U.S.-Pakistani relations from partitioning of the subcontinent in 1947 up through the present day. It is muddled story, meandering through periods of friendship and enmity. Riedel deftly interprets the tortuous path of relations between two very different nations that remain, in many ways, stuck with each other.The Preface to the paperback provides an inside account of the discovery of Osama bin Laden's Abbottabad hideout that led to the al Qaeda leader's demise. Accusations of Pakistani complicity in harboring bin Laden once again dramatized the ambivalence and distrust existing between two nations that purport to be allies. Riedel discusses what it all means for the war on terror and the future of U.S.- Pakistani relations.Praise for the hardcover edition of Deadly Embrace "Mr. Riedel, who has advised no fewer than four American presidents, knows power from the inside--something he is keen to share with the reader.... His book provides a useful account of the dysfunctional relationship between Pakistan and America." -- The Economist "Bruce Riedel has produced an excellent volume that is both analytically sharp and cogently written. It will engage both specialists and the interested public. Essential reading."--Peter Bergen, author of Holy War, Inc. and The Osama bin Laden I Know "Riedel lucidly provides an overview of the last thirty years of Pakistan's internal politics, its relationship with the United States, as well as the various insurgent and terrorist groups with which it has had close association. The book is informed by his own experiences over most of this period as an intelligence analyst for the U.S. government. As usual with Bruce, it is brilliant, and quite sobering--yet hardly without hope." --Foreign Policy

The Longevity Revolution

by Robert Butler

Dr. Robert N. Butler coined the term "ageism" and made "Alzheimer's" a familiar word. Now he brings his formidable knowledge to a recent and unprecedented achievement: the extension of human life expectancy by thirty years, and the growing number of people over age sixty-five. Alarmingly, our society has not adapted to this change. In this urgent and ultimately optimistic book, Butler calls for us to reexamine our personal and societal approach to aging right now, so that the boomers and the generations that follow may have a financially secure and vigorous final chapter of life.

Damned Lies and Statistics

by Joel Best

Here, by popular demand, is the updated edition to Joel Best's classic guide to understanding how numbers can confuse us. In his new afterword, Best uses examples from recent policy debates to reflect on the challenges to improving statistical literacy. Since its publication ten years ago, Damned Lies and Statistics has emerged as the go-to handbook for spotting bad statistics and learning to think critically about these influential numbers.

Eclipse of the Sunnis

by Deborah Amos

Hundreds of thousands of Sunni Muslims displaced or exiled by the conflict in Iraq have spread across the Middle East, unbalancing that sensitive region. From Amman to Beirut and Damascus, Deborah Amos follows the impact of one of the great migrations of modern times. The history of the Middle East tells us that one of the greatest problems of the last forty years has been that of a displaced population, angered by their inability to safely return home and resume ownership of their property-as they see it. Now, the pattern has been repeated. A new population of exiles, as large as the Palestinians, has been created. This particular displacement stirs up the historic conflict between Sunni and Shia. More significant even than the creation of colonial nation states a century ago, the alienation of the Sunni middle class has the capacity to cause resounding resentments across the region for generations to come.

Education Studies: An Issues-based Approach

by John Sharp Stephen Ward Les Hankin

Education Studies continues to grow as a popular undergraduate area of study in the UK. This core text addresses themes common to all education studies courses. It benefits from a large list of contributors from key institutions. This fully revised and updated second edition includes chapters on education and employment, new media, and sex and relationships education. For each topic, an overview and discussion are accompanied by features such as 'Research' and 'Pause for Thought' boxes to promote reflection and analysis.

Blood Iron and Gold

by Christian Wolmar

This history of railways is based on an immodest (but true) premise: Railroads changed the world, knitting together nations such as Canada, the U. S. , and Russia, and making it possible for North American farmers to feed a hungry world. Wolmar tells the exciting story of how railroads grew from small beginnings to span entire continents, without leaving out the terrible price that was often paid for this growth by railway workers and indigenous peoples. Readers will see the engineering marvels that made the trans-Panama and Trans-Siberian railways, along with the epic bad planning that made it difficult to knit Australia's multi-gauge railways into a single system. Although Wolmar occasionally gets mired in train-geek details, his vast knowledge of railroading and infectious enthusiasm will carry readers along for an exciting ride. Annotation ©2010 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

The Imaginations of Unreasonable Men

by Bill Shore

A small cadre of scientists--collaborators and competitors--are determined to develop a vaccine for malaria, a feat most tropical disease experts have long considered impossible. Skepticism, doubt, and a host of logistical and financial obstacles dog their quest. Success may ultimately elude them. Why, and how, do they persist? The kind of person who decides to combat malaria must have a very rare combination of attributes: dogged enough to keep going when results are slow; independent enough to continue, often alone, when other, more popular, causes distract attention from their work; self-confident enough in the importance of the work to persist when the beneficiaries may reside thousands of miles distant. Above all, taking on a challenge of this scale requires a fearlessly bold moral imagination that defies reason. Bill Shore tells the story of man's attempt to combat malaria through the drama of the handful of scientists and organizations currently seeking to curb, and in one case, at least, cure, the world of this most ancient and persistent scourge. It is a drama to the death. The story of these uncompromising scientists serves as a springboard for Shore's passionate inquiry into the character and moral fabric of those who devote their lives to solving the world's most pressing and perplexing problems. During his career as a social entrepreneur Shore has persistently wrestled with this fundamental question: What does it take to make a truly transformational difference? To achieve not just incremental progress but a game changer or, in the case of malaria, a life saver? In this moving and inspiring book, he offers compelling answers.

Cane Toads and Other Rogue Species

by Karl Weber

What does an unusually large, ugly, invasive species of toad have to do with global warming, international trade, and the survival of biodiversity? Quite a lot, actually. Mark Lewis's amazing and hilarious documentaryCane Toadstells the story of Bufo marinus, which was introduced to Australia in 1935 to control bugs but which quickly became a far greater menace than the beetles they eat. Today they number in the hundreds of millions and are taking over Australian habitats at 25 miles per year, spreading disease and killing native species as they go. Rogue Speciesexplains the little-understood dangers of invasive species. Ranging from the zebra mussel (currently threatening the health of the Great Lakes) to the infamous kudzu vine (a Japanese import that now smothers seven million acres in the American southeast), these disastrous human blunders threaten the biodiversity on which all life-including our own-depends. The book will raise readers' awareness about the threat of non-native species, increase their appreciation of natural biodiversity, and explain what they can do to help protect unique ecosystems wherever they live or travel.

Born in Africa

by Martin Meredith

Africa does not give up its secrets easily. Buried there lie answers to the origins of humankind. After a century of investigation, scientists have transformed our understanding about the beginnings of human life. Many remarkable discoveries have been made. Yet even as the evidence about human evolution has continued to grow, so the riddle has become ever more complex. And ultimate clues still remain hidden. Born in Africa tells the scintillating true story of the scientists who have striven to uncover the mysteries of human origins over the past hundred years. Through a dramatic and persuasive narrative Martin Meredith recreates the excitement and the danger of their journey as well as celebrating the momentous discoveries yielded by their quest. Scientists have identified more than twenty species of extinct humans. They have firmly established Africa as the birthplace not only of humankind but also of modern humans. And they have shown how modern humans, possessing a wide range of skills and language ability, spread out from Africa in an exodus sixty thousand years ago to populate the rest of the world. We have all inherited an African past.

The Great Depression

by Benjamin Roth

When the stock market crashed in 1929, Benjamin Roth was a young lawyer in Youngstown, Ohio. After he began to grasp the magnitude of what had happened to American economic life, he decided to set down his impressions in his diary. This collection of those entries reveals another side of the Great Depression-one lived through by ordinary, middle-class Americans, who on a daily basis grappled with a swiftly changing economy coupled with anxiety about the unknown future. Roth's depiction of life in time of widespread foreclosures, a schizophrenic stock market, political unrest and mass unemployment seem to speak directly to readers today.

The Case for Books

by Robert Darnton

The invention of writing was one of the most important technological, cultural, and sociological breakthroughs in human history. With the printed book, information and ideas could disseminate more widely and effectively than ever before-and in some cases, affect and redirect the sway of history. Today, nearly one million books are published each year. But is the era of the book as we know it-a codex of bound pages-coming to an end? And if it is, should we celebrate its demise and the creation of a democratic digital future, or mourn an irreplaceable loss? The digital age is revolutionizing the information landscape. Already, more books have been scanned and digitized than were housed in the great library in Alexandria, making available millions of texts for a curious reader at the click of a button, and electronic book sales are growing exponentially. Will this revolution in the delivery of information and entertainment make for more transparent and far-reaching dissemination or create a monopolistic stranglehold? In The Case for Books, Robert Darnton, an intellectual pioneer in the field of the history of the book and director of Harvard University's Library, offers an in-depth examination of the book from its earliest beginnings to its shifting role today in popular culture, commerce, and the academy. As an author, editorial advisor, and publishing entrepreneur, Darnton is a unique authority on the life and role of the book in society. This book is a wise work of scholarship-one that requires readers to carefully consider how the digital revolution will broadly affect the marketplace of ideas.

The Wars of Afghanistan

by Peter Tomsen

An insider's account of Afghanistan's history since the 1970s and how the CIA's covert operations and the Pentagon's military strategy have strengthened extremism in the country.

George Soros On Globalization

by George Soros

This is a paperbound reprint of a 2002 book. Arguing that economic globalization has led to the creation of wealth but that the distribution of goods has been lopsided, financier Soros puts forth some recommendations towards the reform of the global economy. He argues that the international financial and trade institutions need to be reformed and suggests that although the World Trade Organization's rules-based system is good for the transfer of private goods, it needs to be complemented by an incentives based system for the provision of public good. Annotation ©2004 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

The New Paradigm for Financial Markets

by George Soros

Prominent financier George Soros states in the Introduction to this edition: ¿This book puts forward a conceptual framework for understanding human affairs in general and financial markets in particular. I have been working on it all my life but it is only now that the framework has gained some recognition because not only did it explain the Crash of 2008 but more or less predicted how it would happen. Most of this book was written at the end of 2007 and the beginning of 2008. Part Three: The Crash of 2008 and What It Means, is intended to bring the book and my arguments up to date. The current breakdown is a relatively recent event whose full impact has not yet been felt. ¿ Graphs.

My War

by Andy Rooney

Rooney, a popular television commentator, gives a moving and instructive account of coming of age during WWII. He tells of his works as a combat reporter during the war, with , the military newspaper for the GIs. He gives readers a ground level view of the pettiness and glories of a mighty military machine, the terrible costs of combat, the constant presence of humor, and the ordinary people who saved the world from becoming the province of a madman. Includes b&w historical photos of and by Rooney. Annotation c. Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

Blind Man's Bluff

by Sherry Sontag

Submarines and Submarine Warfare

Diamonds, Gold, and War

by Martin Meredith

The prize was great -- not just land, but the riches it held, in the form of diamonds and gold. What became a country called South Africa was, until 1910, a vast and untamed land where great fortunes could be made (and lost); where great battles were fought (and lost); and where great men had their reputations forged, or dashed, or sometimes both. Martin Meredith's follow-up to his magisterial The State of Africa is an equally epic new history of the making of South Africa. Covering the extraordinarily eventful four decades leading up to the establishment of the Union of South Africa in 1910, it covers some of the most iconic tales of imperial history. The Zulus at Rorke's Drift; the Jameson Raid; the diamond and gold rushes at Kimberley and Witwatersrand; the Boer wars; the titanic struggle between the arch-imperialist Cecil Rhodes and his Boer rival, Paul Kruger -- DIAMONDS, GOLD AND WAR brings all of these and more together in a stunningly coherent and compelling narrative. History, somehow, just isn't as colourful any more.

A Choice of Enemies

by Lawrence Freedman

The United States is locked into three prolonged conflicts without much hope of early resolution. Iran is pursuing a nuclear programme; the aftermath of the overthrow of Saddam Hussein has seen unrelenting intercommunal violence; and the Taliban have got back into Afghanistan. Lawrence Freedman teases out the roots of each engagement over the last thirty years and demonstrates with clarity and scholarship the influence of these conflicts upon each other. The story is complex and often marked by great drama. First, the countries in dispute with America are not themselves natural allies; second, their enmity was not, at first, America's choice. Third, the region's problems cannot all be traced to the Arab-Israeli dispute. Unique in its focus, this book will offer not only new revelations but also remind us of what has been forgotten or has never been put in context.

Long After Midnight at the Nino Bien: A Yanqui's Missteps in Argentina

by Brian Winter

In 1999, twenty-two-year-old Brian Winter packed his bags and headed for Buenos Aires. He learned the language, got to know the people and suffered with them as the peso bottomed out. And he became infected by an Argentine obsession -- the tango. Since its birth in the city's streets and brothels in the 1880's, tango has remained the heartbeat of Argentine life, a barometer of its rising and falling fortunes. Flourishing in the grand milongas -- dance halls -- of Buenos Aires' early-twentieth-century belle epoque, its supremacy was later challenged by the emergence of rock 'n' roll. But tango survived to enjoy a renaissance in Argentina and across the world. Long After Midnight at the Nino Bien explores Argentina through its obsession with the dance, telling of Winter's adventures in the sexy, over-caffeinated late-night world of Buenos Aires' tango halls. We meet local characters like El Tigre, a merchant marine turned tango professor and B-movie star, who has danced everywhere from Algeria to Japan; El Tano, a spectacularly foul-mouthed insurance salesman who scraped by for thirty years in Milwaukee giving tango lessons; and Hugo, a wiry mechanic who sometimes goes a whole week without sleep but manages (thanks to ten espressos a night) to cultivate a baker's dozen of stunning groupies. The tango at its heart is escapism, pure and simple u 'the vertical expression of a horizontal desire', and perhaps this explains why the milongas are so often packed to capacity at 4am on a Monday night. Part travel narrative, part memoir and part cultural history of a remarkable and troubled country and the dance that epitomizes it, Long After Midnight at the Nino Bien provides a unique insight into the Argentinian soul.

Gusher of Lies

by Robert Bryce

Everybody is talking about "energy independence. " But is it really achievable-or even desirable? In this controversial, meticulously researched book, Robert Bryce exposes the false promises and political posturing behind the rhetoric. Gusher of Liesexplains why the idea of energy independence appeals to voters while also showing that renewable sources like wind and solar cannot meet America's growing energy demand. Along the way, Bryce exposes the ethanol scam as one of the longest-running robberies ever perpetrated on American taxpayers. In a new foreword to this edition, he shows how energy independence rhetoric was used during the 2008 election, even as the heavily subsidized ethanol business fueled a growing global food crisis.

The Place to Be

by Roger Mudd

Famed journalist and broadcast anchor Roger Mudd recounts his days with CBS and how that news bureau operated during its heady days as a global information leader. From the congressional debate during the passing of the 1964 Civil Rights Act to Mudd's departure from CBS in 1980, he offers an insider's glimpse into the political events of the last half of the twentieth century with an informative, episodic narrative structure. Mudd offers equal doses of humor and meaning with each story of this memoir, which should appeal to anyone who has followed his career through the decades. Annotation ©2008 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

What Happened

by Scott Mcclellan

In the bestselling book that provoked a media sensation, former White House press secretary Scott McClellan takes readers behind the scenes of the presidency of George W. Bush. Scott McClellan was one of a few Bush loyalists from Texas who became part of his inner circle of trusted advisers, and remained so during one of the most challenging and contentious periods of recent history. Drawn to Bush by his commitment to compassionate conservatism and strong bipartisan leadership, McClellan served the president for more than seven years, and witnessed day-to-day exactly how the presidency veered off course. In this refreshingly clear-eyed book, written with no agenda other than to record his experiences and insights for the benefit of history, McClellan provides unique perspective on what happened and why it happened the way it did, including the Iraq War, Hurricane Katrina, Washington's bitter partisanship and two hotly-contested presidential campaigns. He gives readers a candid look into what George W Bush is and what he believes and into the personalities, strengths, and liabilities of his top aides. Finally, McClellan looks to the future, exploring the lessons this presidency offers the American people as they prepare to elect a new leader.

Showing 40,026 through 40,050 of 73,627 results

Help

Select your download format based upon: 1) how you want to read your book, and 2) compatibility with your reading tool. For more details, visit the Formats page under the Getting Started tab.

See and hear words read aloud
  • DAISY Text - See words on the screen and hear words being read aloud with the text-to-speech voice installed on your reading tool. Navigate by page, chapter, section, and more. Can also be used in audio-only mode. Compatible with many reading tools, including Bookshare’s free reading tools.
  • DAISY Text with Images - Similar to DAISY Text with the addition of images within the Text. Your reading tool must support images.
  • Read Now with Bookshare Web Reader - Read and see images directly from your Internet browser without downloading! Text-to-speech voicing and word highlighting are available on Google Chrome (extension installation required). Other browsers can be used with limited features. Learn more
Listen to books with audio only
  • DAISY Audio - Listen to books in audio-only mode with the high-quality Kendra voice by Ivona pre-installed. Navigate by page, chapter, section, and more. Must be used with a DAISY Audio compatible reading tool.
  • MP3 - Listen to books in audio-only mode with the high-quality Kendra voice by Ivona pre-installed. Navigate using tracks. Can be used with any MP3 player.
Read in Braille
  • BRF (Braille Ready Format) - Read with any BRF compatible refreshable braille display; navigate using the search or find feature.
  • DAISY Text - Read with any DAISY 3.0 compatible refreshable braille display, navigate by page, chapter, section, and more.
  • Embossed Braille - Use Bookshare’s DAISY Text or BRF formats to generate embossed braille.