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Slocum and The Misty Creek Massacre

by Jake Logan

After a drunken night in Dodge City, Slocum realizes he was robbed in a game of poker. And when he find the men responsible, he sets out to beat them at their own game. .

Longarm and the 400 Blows

by Tabor Evans

Longarm comes to Fort Marion to extradite prisoner Anton Gardner, who robbed a military payroll and killed seven men. But when he's set upon by too many enemies to handle, Gardner escapes with Longarm's badge and impersonates him. One thing's for sure. . . Longarm is not down for the count. .

The Shadow Patrol

by Alex Berenson

A killer is on the loose . . . In 2009, the CIA officers in Afghanistan's Kabul Station received information from a reliable source regarding the whereabouts of Osama bin Laden. But when they followed the informant to bin Laden's apparent location, they discovered it was a deadly trap. The man blew himself up, taking the chief of station and several senior officers with him. Two years later, the station still hasn't recovered and the situation has deteriorated. Every initiative meets with failure. No one knows who to trust. In desperation, John Wells' old CIA bosses ask him to go over and investigate. Reluctantly, Wells agrees but what he finds when he gets there is more than a station in disarray. There is a full-blown military drug-smuggling operation underway, and worse, a traitor is leaking information to the Taliban. Americans are dying, and an American is responsible - and this is just the beginning. Only Wells stands in the traitor's way . . . for now.

Bloodrose

by Andrea Cremer

The third and final installment of the international bestselling Nightshade trilogy! Calla has always welcomed war. But now that the final battle is upon her, there's more at stake than fighting. There's saving Ren, even if it incurs Shay's wrath. There's keeping Ansel safe, even if he's been branded a traitor. There's proving herself as the pack's alpha, facing unnamable horrors, and ridding the world of the Keepers' magic once and for all. And then there's deciding what to do when the war ends. If Calla makes it out alive, that is. In this remarkable final installment of the Nightshade trilogy, international bestselling author Andrea Cremer crafts a dynamic novel with twists and turns that will keep you breathless until its final pages.

The Royal Wulff Murders

by Keith Mccafferty

Fans of C. J. Box, Craig Johnson, and Carl Hiassen will love this witty debut mystery set on the banks of Montana's Madison River Angling is a multibillion dollar business, and no one knows that better than Keith McCafferty, the award-winning survival and outdoor skills editor of Field & Stream magazine and resident of Montana, home to the world's most fanatical fly fishing community. In McCafferty's compelling debut, a young man is found dead with a Royal Wulff trout fly stuck through his lip. Sheriff Martha Ettinger's investigation leads her to cross paths with fly fisher, painter, and has-been private detective Sean Stranahan. As the water temperature rises, the clues point them both toward Montana's big business: fly fishing. Where there's money, there's bound to be crime. .

The Garden Intrigue

by Lauren Willig

In the ninth installment of Lauren Willig's bestselling Pink Carnation series, an atrocious poet teams up with an American widow to prevent Napoleon's invasion of England. Secret agent Augustus Whittlesby has spent a decade undercover in France, posing as an insufferably bad poet. The French surveillance officers can't bear to read his work closely enough to recognize the information drowned in a sea of verbiage. New York-born Emma Morris Delagardie is a thorn in Augustus's side. An old school friend of Napoleon's stepdaughter, she came to France with her uncle, the American envoy; eloped with a Frenchman; and has been rattling around the salons of Paris ever since. Widowed for four years, she entertains herself by drinking too much champagne, holding a weekly salon, and loudly critiquing Augustus's poetry. As Napoleon pursues his plans for the invasion of England, Whittlesby hears of a top-secret device to be demonstrated at a house party at Malmaison. The catch? The only way in is with Emma, who has been asked to write a masque for the weekend's entertainment. Emma is at a crossroads: Should she return to the States or remain in France? She'll do anything to postpone the decision-even if it means teaming up with that silly poet Whittlesby to write a masque for Bonaparte's house party. But each soon learns that surface appearances are misleading. In this complicated masque within a masque, nothing goes quite as scripted- especially Augustus's feelings for Emma. .

The Emergency State

by David C. Unger

Editor's Choice, NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW "Ambitious and valuable" --WASHINGTON POST America is trapped in a state of war that has consumed our national life since before Pearl Harbor. Over seven decades and several bloody wars, Democratic and Republican politicians alike have assembled an increasing complicated-and increasingly ineffective-network of security services. Trillions of tax dollars have been diverted from essential domestic needs while the Pentagon created a worldwide web of military bases, inventing new American security interests where none previously existed. Yet this pursuit has not only damaged our democratic institutions and undermined our economic strength-it has fundamentally failed to make us safer. In The Emergency State, senior New York Times journalist David C. Unger reveals the hidden costs of America's obsessive pursuit of absolute national security, showing how this narrow-minded emphasis on security came to distort our political life. Unger reminds us that in the first 150 years of the American republic the U. S. valued limited military intervention abroad, along with the checks and balances put in place by the founding fathers. Yet American history took a sharp turn during and just after World War II, when we began building a vast and cumbersome complex of national security institutions and beliefs. Originally designed to wage hot war against Germany and cold war against the Soviet Union, our security bureaucracy has become remarkably ineffective at confronting the elusive, non-state sponsored threats we now face. The Emergency State traces a series of missed opportunities-from the end of World War II to the election of Barack Obama-when we could have paused to rethink our defense strategy and didn't. We have ultimately failed to dismantle our outdated national security state because both parties are equally responsible for its expansion. While countless books have exposed the damage wrought by George W. Bush's "war on terror," Unger shows it was only the natural culmination of decades of bipartisan emergency state logic-and argues that Obama, along with many previous Democratic presidents, has failed to shift course in any meaningful way. The Emergency State: America's Pursuit of Absolute Security At All Costs reveals the depth of folly into which we've fallen, as Americans eagerly trade away the country's greatest strengths for a fleeting illusion of safety. Provocative, insightful, and refreshingly nonpartisan, The Emergency State is the definitive untold story of how America became this vulnerable-and how it can build true security again. .

Michael at the Invasion of France, 1943

by Laurie Calkhoven

When the Nazis invade Paris, Michael, a thirteen-year- old French-American, wants to be a part of the Resistance. Starting small, vandalizing Nazi propaganda and refusing to hail Hitler, Michael works his way into the full-blown Resistance, escorting American aviators to safe zones and delivering important spy documents. But when an injured pilot needs help to escape France, will Michael be brave enough to complete the mission? With historical notes, time lines, and maps to augment the page-turning action, it's easy to see why School Library Journal says Boys of Wartime "will appeal to history buffs and reluctant readers alike. " .

Juliette Gordon Low: The Remarkable Founder of the Girl Scouts

by Stacy A. Cordery

Born at the start of the Civil War, Juliette "Daisy" Gordon Low struggled to reconcile being a good Southern belle with being true to her adventurous spirit. Accidentally deafened, she married a dashing British patrician and moved to England, where she quickly became dissatisfied with the aimlessness of privileged life. Her search for greater purpose ended when she met Robert Baden-Powell, founder of the Boy Scouts, and was inspired to recreate his program for girls. The Girl Scouts of the USA--which can now count more than fifty-nine million American girls and women among its past members--aims to instill useful skills and moral values in its young members, with an emphasis on fun. In this lively and accessible biography of its intrepid founder, Stacy A. Cordery paints a dynamic portrait of an intriguing woman and a true pioneer whose work touched the lives of millions of girls and women around the world. .

Holding Our World Together: Ojibwe Women and the Survival of Community

by Brenda J. Child

A groundbreaking exploration of the remarkable women in Native American communities. Too often ignored or underemphasized in favor of their male warrior counterparts, Native American women have played a more central role in guiding their nations than has ever been understood. Many Native communities were, in fact, organized around women's labor, the sanctity of mothers, and the wisdom of female elders. In this well-researched and deeply felt account of the Ojibwe of Lake Superior and the Mississippi River, Brenda J. Child details the ways in which women have shaped Native American life from the days of early trade with Europeans through the reservation era and beyond. The latest volume in the Penguin Library of American Indian History, Holding Our World Together illuminates the lives of women such as Madeleine Cadotte, who became a powerful mediator between her people and European fur traders, and Gertrude Buckanaga, whose postwar community activism in Minneapolis helped bring many Indian families out of poverty. Drawing on these stories and others, Child offers a powerful tribute to the many courageous women who sustained Native communities through the darkest challenges of the last three centuries. .

Charlotte au Chocolat

by Charlotte Silver

Like Eloise growing up in the Plaza Hotel, Charlotte Silver grew up in her mother's restaurant. Located in Harvard Square, Upstairs at the Pudding was a confection of pink linen tablecloths and twinkling chandeliers, a decadent backdrop for childhood. Over dinners of foie gras and Dover sole, always served with a Shirley Temple, Charlotte kept company with a rotating cast of eccentric staff members. After dinner, in her frilly party dress, she often caught a nap under the bar until closing time. Her one constant was her glamorous, indomitable mother, nicknamed "Patton in Pumps," a wasp-waisted woman in cocktail dress and stilettos who shouldered the burden of raising a family and running a kitchen. Charlotte's unconventional upbringing takes its toll, and as she grows up she wishes her increasingly busy mother were more of a presence in her life. But when the restaurant-forever teetering on the brink of financial collapse-looks as if it may finally be closing, Charlotte comes to realize the sacrifices her mother has made to keep the family and restaurant afloat and gains a new appreciation of the world her mother has built. Infectious, charming, and at times wistful, Charlotte au Chocolat is a celebration of the magic of a beautiful presentation and the virtues of good manners, as well as a loving tribute to the author's mother-a woman who always showed her best face to the world. .

Attack of the Tighty Whities

by Nancy Krulik Aaron Blecha

George Brown learns the hard way that an onion a day won't keep the Super Burp away - despite what his best friend Alex might've hoped. It's bad enough that one of the pesky, magic belches escapes at the mall and another lets loose on a miniature golf cou

A Diamond in the Desert

by Kathryn Fitzmaurice

For Tetsu, baseball is so much more than just a game On December 6, 1941, Tetsu is a twelve-year-old California boy who loves baseball. On December 7, 1941, everything changes. The bombing of Pearl Harbor means Tetsu's Japanese-American family will be relocated to an internment camp. Gila River camp isn't technically a prison, but with nowhere to go, nothing to do, and no time frame for leaving, it might as well be. So when someone has the idea of building a baseball diamond and starting a team, Tetsu is overjoyed. But then his sister gets dangerously sick, forcing him to choose between his family and his love of the game. This is an impeccably researched, lyrical story about baseball, honor, and a turbulent period in U. S. history. .

The Importance of Being Earnest and Other Plays

by Oscar Wilde

Enduring Literature Illuminated by Practical Scholarship Wilde's classic comedy of manners, The Importance of Being Earnest, and his other popular plays -- Lady Windermere's Fan, An Ideal Husband, and Salome -- challenged comtemporary notions of sex and sensibility, class and cultural identity. This Enriched Classic Edition includes: bull; A concise introduction that gives readers important background information bull; A chronology of the author's life and work bull; A timeline of significant events that provides the book's historical context bull; An outline of key themes and plot points to help readers form their own interpretations bull; Detailed explanatory notes bull; Critical analysis, including contemporary and modern perspectives on the work bull; Discussion questions to promote lively classroom and book group interaction bull; A list of recommended related books and films to broaden the reader's experience Enriched Classics offer readers affordable editions of great works of literature enhanced by helpful notes and insightful commentary. The scholarship provided in Enriched Classics enables readers to appreciate, understand, and enjoy the world's finest books to their full potential. Series edited by Cynthia Brantley Johnson

The Conundrum: How Scientific Innovation, Increased Efficiency, and Good Intentions Can Make Our Energy and Climate Problems Worse

by David Owen

The Conundrum is a mind-changing manifesto about the environment, efficiency, and the real path to sustainability.

Shaded Vision: An Otherworld Novel

by Yasmine Galenorn

It's Valentine's Day and the D'Artigo women are preparing for their friend Iris' wedding. But when Delilah and her sisters get word that the Super Community Centre has been bombed, things get really ugly. The evil coyote shifters, known as the Koyami, are back and Newkirk, their new leader, has joined forces with a group of rogue sorcerers. Then, just when they think things can't get worse, the demon lord Shadow Wing sends in a new front man and things really go to hell. This is a sexy, dark and enthralling read.

Roots of Style

by Isabel Toledo

Roots of Style is a rare look into the mind, life, and journey of one of our generation's most coveted fashion designers, Isabel Toledo. From the nostalgic and permanent in­fluence of her upbringing in Cuba and the serendipitous love that materialized her vision and fueled her conviction, to the timeless mark she continues to make on the fashion industry, Isabel weaves together all of her impressions to express her true inspiration and authenticity. Isabel's words--interpreted by artwork from her husband, one of fashion's most prolific illustrators, Ruben Toledo--tell an eloquent and visually stunning story about how fashion gave a form of communication to a curious girl who was fascinated by design, craftsmanship, and sewing. Through Isabel's personal and engaging accounts, Roots of Style inspires readers to follow their instincts, trust their individuality, and discover their own personal style signature. .

I Beat the Odds: From Homelessness, to the Blind Side, and Beyond

by Michael Oher

The football star made famous in the hit film (and book) The Blind Side reflects on how far he has come from the circumstances of his youth. Michael Oher shares his personal account of his story, in this inspirational New York Times bestseller. Looking back on how he went from being a homeless child in Memphis to playing in the NFL, Michael talks about the goals he had to break out of the cycle of poverty, addiction, and hopelessness that trapped his family. Eventually he grasped onto football as his ticket out and worked hard to make his dream into a reality. With his adoptive family, the Touhys, and other influential people in mind, he describes the absolute necessity of seeking out positive role models and good friends who share the same values to achieve one's dreams. Sharing untold stories of heartache, determination, courage, and love, I Beat the Odds is an incredibly rousing tale of one young man's quest to achieve the American dream.

Bright Side Up: 100 Ways to be Happier Right Now

by Amy Spencer

You don't need to reinvent your whole life to be happier-you just need to turn it bright side up!We all have those days when life could use a lift. Enter Bright Side Up, a clever and comforting compendium to help you shift your perspective and appreciate what's right in front of you. With the warmth and wisdom of a dear friend, this deceptively simple guide offers emergency optimism when you need it with fresh tips that can be put to use on the spot, including:Thank the lemonsRally in the rain delaySteer life like a motorcycleAsk your one-hundred-year-old selfPlan your party storyDip in whenever you need a boost. Because when you can find the sunshine in your every day, you'll feel brighter, too.

Born Wicked

by Jessica Spotswood

A Great and Terrible Beauty meets Cassandra Clare in this spellbinding fantasy Everybody knows Cate Cahill and her sisters are eccentric. Too pretty, too reclusive, and far too educated for their own good. But the truth is even worse: they're witches. And if their secret is discovered by the priests of the Brotherhood, it would mean an asylum, a prison ship - or an early grave. Before her mother died, Cate promised to protect her sisters. But with only six months left to choose between marriage and the Sisterhood, she might not be able to keep her word . . . especially after she finds her mother's diary, uncovering a secret that could spell her family's destruction. Desperate to find alternatives to their fate, Cate starts scouring banned books and questioning rebellious new friends, all while juggling tea parties, shocking marriage proposals, and a forbidden romance with the completely unsuitable Finn Belastra. If what her mother wrote is true, the Cahill girls aren't safe. Not from the Brotherhood, the Sisterhood - not even from each other.

All Necessary Force: A Pike Logan Thriller

by Brad Taylor

Retired Delta Force officer Brad Taylor--whose debut thriller, One Rough Man, was a national bestseller--continues his electrifying Pike Logan series. A terrorist hit is coming. The CIA, FBI, and Department of Defense systems have spiked, but traditional intel is going nowhere. It falls to the Taskforce--a top secret team that exists outside the bounds of U. S. law and is charged with finding and destroying asymmetric threats--to stop the unknown conspirators. A shadowy trailer leads the Taskforce through Asia and into Egypt, where an attack leaves one hardened Taskforce member dead and another barely breathing. Pike Logan and his partner, Jennifer Cahill, are forced to helm the increasingly convoluted and dangerous mission--a mission that tests Jennifer's ability to justify means to an end and Pike's tenuous ability to stay in control. Sifting their way through the opposing plots of two terrorist organizations will turn out to be th least of their problems when a weapon of unthinkable power touches American soil--the only country in which Taskforce members are forbidden to operate, and the only country that Pike Logan may be unable to save. Told with unparalleled realism informed by Taylor's decades of experience in the Special Forces and Delta Force, All Necessary Force takes readers on a terrifying and relentless journey. .

This One Time With Julia

by David Lampson

After Joe's parents died, he stopped growing up. He doesn't know where his money comes from. His diet consists primarily of cheeseburgers from McDonald's. He plays basketball on the level of a pro, but he has only ever played on the streets. Then his brother disappears, and Julia shows up. Joe falls in love with Julia as quickly as his twin brother, Alvin, did. And like Alvin did before him, he runs away with Julia to her parents' hotel. There, he's so blinded by her seductive, dysfunctional family that he can't see the truth of his brother's disappearance . . . until he accidentally stumbles upon Alvin's killer. .

The Rules of Inheritance

by Smith Claire Bidwell

A 2012 Books for a Better Life nominee A resonant memoir of the ways untimely good-byes echo through the years by a writer who has considered every nuance of grief. At age fourteen, Claire Bidwell Smith-an only child- learned that both of her parents had cancer. The fear of becoming a family of one before she came of age compels Claire to make a series of fraught choices, set against the glittering backdrop of New York and Los Angeles - and the pall of regret. When the inevitable happens, and Claire is alone in the world, she is inconsolable at the revelation that suddenly she is no one's special person. It is only when Claire eventually falls in love, marries, and becomes a mother that she emerges from the fog of grief. Defying a conventional framework, this story is told using the five stages of grief as a window into Smith's experience. As in the very best memoirs, the author's powerful and exquisite writing renders personal events into universal experience. .

Red Ruby Heart in a Cold Blue Sea

by Morgan Callan Rogers

A captivating debut, introducing a spirited young heroine coming of age in coastal Maine during the early 1960s. When her mother disappears during a weekend trip, Florine Gilham's idyllic childhood is turned upside down. Until then she'd been blissfully insulated by the rhythms of family life in small town Maine: watching from the granite cliffs above the sea for her father's lobster boat to come into port, making bread with her grandmother, and infiltrating the summer tourist camps with her friends. But with her mother gone, the heart falls out of Florine's life and she and her father are isolated as they struggle to manage their loss. Both sustained and challenged by the advice and expectations of her family and neighbors, Florine grows up with her spirit intact. And when her father's past comes to call, she must accept that life won't ever be the same while keeping her mother vivid in her memories. With Fannie Flagg's humor and Elizabeth Stroud's sense of place, this debut is an extraordinary snapshot of a bygone America through the eyes of an inspiring girl blazing her own path to womanhood. .

Going Solo

by Eric Klinenberg

Going Solo is an examination of the most significant demographic shift since the Baby Boom - the sharp increase in the number of people who live alone.

Showing 40,426 through 40,450 of 112,444 results

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