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Showing 40,676 through 40,700 of 72,419 results

The Myth of the Lost Cause and Civil War History

by Gary W. Gallagher Alan T. Nolan

Was the Confederacy doomed from the start in its struggle against the superior might of the Union? Did its forces fight heroically against all odds for the cause of states' rights? In reality, these suggestions are an elaborate and intentional effort on the part of Southerners to rationalize the secession and the war itself. Unfortunately, skillful propagandists have been so successful in promoting this romanticized view that the Lost Cause has assumed a life of its own. Misrepresenting the war's true origins and its actual course, the myth of the Lost Cause distorts our national memory. In The Myth of the Lost Cause and Civil War History, nine historians describe and analyze the Lost Cause, identifying ways in which it falsifies history--creating a volume that makes a significant contribution to Civil War historiography.

Extraordinary Circumstances

by Brian K. Burton

The first campaign in the Civil War in which Robert E. Lee led the Army of Northern Virginia, the Seven Days Battles were fought southeast of the Confederate capital of Richmond in the summer of 1862. Lee and his fellow officers, including "Stonewall" Jackson, James Longstreet, A. P. Hill, and D. H. Hill, pushed George B. McClellan's Army of the Potomac from the gates of Richmond to the James River, where the Union forces reached safety. Along the way, Lee lost several opportunities to harm McClellan. The Seven Days have been the subject of numerous historical treatments, but none more detailed and engaging than Brian K. Burton's retelling of the campaign that lifted Southern spirits, began Lee's ascent to fame, and almost prompted European recognition of the Confederacy.

Jazzwomen

by Wayne Enstice Janis Stockhouse

"Their conversations range far beyond the biographical--to their feelings, motivations, musical approaches, and attitudes. These women were obviously comfortable with their questioners. [Enstice and Stockhouse] came prepared, having delved deeply into the music and history of each, bringing them closer to the essence of each musician." --from the Preface by Cobi Narita and Paul Ash"Jazzwomen includes many artists who are not covered in earlier books and also reveals new information about artists who are. In addition, the interview format used in Jazzwomen provides the reader with each artist's own words, permeated with a warmth and immediacy not typically found in author narratives. Jazzwomen is a much-needed book." --David N. Baker, Distinguished Professor of Music and Chairman, Jazz Department, Indiana University School of Music; and Artistic and Musical Director, Smithsonian Jazz Masterworks OrchestraBetween 1995 and 2000, Wayne Enstice and Janis Stockhouse interviewed dozens of women jazz instrumentalists and vocalists. Jazzwomen collects 21 of the most fascinating interviews. The participants discuss everything--their personal lives, musical training and inspirations, recordings, relationships with other musicians, the music industry, sexism on the bandstand--and often make candid and revealing statements. At the end of each interview is a recommended discography compiled by the authors.Every jazz listener, musician, teacher, and student will be captivated by interviews with Marian McPartland, Regina Carter, Abbey Lincoln, Cassandra Wilson, Diana Krall, and their peers. Includes a sampler CD with complete works by several of the artists, including Jane Ira Bloom and Ingrid Jensen.

Jewish Philosophy as a Guide to Life

by Hilary Putnam

Distinguished philosopher Hilary Putnam, who is also a practicing Jew, questions the thought of three major Jewish philosophers of the 20th century--Franz Rosenzweig, Martin Buber, and Emmanuel Levinas--to help him reconcile the philosophical and religious sides of his life. An additional presence in the book is Ludwig Wittgenstein, who, although not a practicing Jew, thought about religion in ways that Putnam juxtaposes to the views of Rosenzweig, Buber, and Levinas. Putnam explains the leading ideas of each of these great thinkers, bringing out what, in his opinion, constitutes the decisive intellectual and spiritual contributions of each of them. Although the religion discussed is Judaism, the depth and originality of these philosophers, as incisively interpreted by Putnam, make their thought nothing less than a guide to life.

The Essential Dewey, Volume 2

by Thomas M. Alexander Larry A. Hickman

In addition to being one of the greatest technical philosophers of the twentieth century, John Dewey (1859-1952) was an educational innovator, a Progressive Era reformer, and one of America's last great public intellectuals. Dewey's insights into the problems of public education, immigration, the prospects for democratic government, and the relation of religious faith to science are as fresh today as when they were first published. His penetrating treatments of the nature and function of philosophy, the ethical and aesthetic dimensions of life, and the role of inquiry in human experience are of increasing relevance at the turn of the 21st century.Based on the award-winning 37-volume critical edition of Dewey's work, The Essential Dewey presents for the first time a collection of Dewey's writings that is both manageable and comprehensive. The volume includes essays and book chapters that exhibit Dewey's intellectual development over time; the selection represents his mature thinking on every major issue to which he turned his attention. Eleven part divisions cover: Dewey in Context; Reconstructing Philosophy; Evolutionary Naturalism; Pragmatic Metaphysics; Habit, Conduct, and Language; Meaning, Truth, and Inquiry; Valuation and Ethics; The Aims of Education; The Individual, the Community, and Democracy; Pragmatism and Culture: Science and Technology, Art and Religion; and Interpretations and Critiques. Taken as a whole, this collection provides unique access to Dewey's understanding of the problems and prospects of human existence and of the philosophical enterprise.

This Is INDIANA

by The The Herald-Times

On a chilly Saturday in December 2011, Tom Crean led his Hoosier basketball players to an upset win over Kentucky, the #1-ranked basketball team in the nation. From that moment on, the revival of IU basketball was becoming a reality. Back in 2008, facing many challenges, Coach Tom Crean walked into Indiana's Assembly Hall, promising a return to glory for Indiana basketball. Four years later, led by Big Ten Freshman of the Year Cody Zeller and the brilliant lineup of Jordan Hulls, Christian Watford, Will Sheehey, Verdell Jones III, and Victor Oladipo, the Hoosiers went 24-7. Making it to the NCAA's Sweet Sixteen, the team once again faced the Wildcats in what would prove to be a thrilling season finale. A keepsake for Hoosiers and basketball lovers everywhere, This Is INDIANA will let you relive this incredible season--game by game, photo by photo.

Africa after Apartheid: South Africa, Race, and Nation in Tanzania

by Richard A. Schroeder

Tracing the expansion of South African business into other areas of Africa in the years after apartheid, Richard A. Schroeder explores why South Africans have not always made themselves welcome guests abroad. By looking at investments in Tanzania, a frontline state in the fight for liberation, Schroeder focuses on the encounter between white South Africans and Tanzanians and the cultural, social, and economic controversies that have emerged as South African firms assume control of local assets. Africa after Apartheid affords a penetrating look at the unexpected results of the expansion of African business opportunities following the demise of apartheid

Us International Lawyers in the Interwar Years

by Hatsue Shinohara

In the interwar years, a group of reform-minded American scholars of international law, such as Quincy Wright and Manley Hudson, challenged traditional international law and strove to establish a 'new' international law in which outlawry of war was institutionalized. They highly valued the Covenant of the League of Nations and the Kellogg-Briand Pact and presented legal arguments in support of them. These scholars were activists in their efforts to promote their views to policy makers and the public. In the US international law community, however, a different group of scholars, notably Edwin Borchard, vehemently opposed the progressive scholars. US International Lawyers in the Interwar Years chronicles those involved in the debate and provides a detailed account of their scholarly works and activities that hitherto have not had the recognition that they deserve.

The President'S Legislative Policy Agenda, 1789-2002

by Jeffrey E. Cohen

Jeffrey E. Cohen asks why U. S. presidents send to Congress the legislative proposals that they do and what Congress does with those proposals. His study covers nearly the entire history of the presidency, from 1789 to 2002. The long historical scope allows Cohen to engage competing perspectives on how the presidency has developed over time. He asks what accounts for the short- and long-term trends in presidential requests to Congress, what substantive policies and issues recommendations are concerned with, and what factors affect the presidential decision to submit a recommendation on a particular issue. The President's Legislative Policy Agenda, 1789-2002 argues that presidents often anticipate the Congressional reaction to their legislative proposals and modify their agendas accordingly.

Husserl'S Crisis of the European Sciences and Transcendental Phenomenology

by Dermot Moran

The Crisis of the European Sciences is Husserl's last and most influential book, written in Nazi Germany where he was discriminated against as a Jew. It incisively identifies the urgent moral and existential crises of the age and defends the relevance of philosophy at a time of both scientific progress and political barbarism. It is also a response to Heidegger, offering Husserl's own approach to the problems of human finitude, history and culture. The Crisis introduces Husserl's influential notion of the 'life-world' - the pre-given, familiar environment that includes both 'nature' and 'culture' - and offers the best introduction to his phenomenology as both method and philosophy. Dermot Moran's rich and accessible introduction to the Crisis explains its intellectual and political context, its philosophical motivations and the themes that characterize it. His book will be invaluable for students and scholars of Husserl's work and of phenomenology in general.

The Politics of Nationalism in Modern Iran

by Ali M. Ansari

This sophisticated and challenging book by the distinguished historian Ali M. Ansari explores the idea of nationalism in the creation of modern Iran. It does so by considering the broader developments in national ideologies that took place following the emergence of the European Enlightenment and showing how these ideas were adopted by a non-European state. Ansari charts a course through twentieth-century Iran, analyzing the growth of nationalistic ideas and their impact on the state and demonstrating the connections between historiographical and political developments. In so doing, he shows how Iran's different regimes manipulated ideologies of nationalism and collective historical memory to suit their own ends. Firmly relocating Reza Shah within the context of the Constitutional Revolution, Ansari argues that Reza Pahlavi's identification with a monarchy by Divine Right bore a greater resemblance to, and facilitated, the religious nationalism that catapulted Ayatollah Khomeini to power on the back of a populist and highly personalized mythology. Drawing on hitherto untapped sources, the book concludes that it was the revolutionary developments and changes that occurred during the first half of the twentieth century that paved the way for later radicalization. As the first book-length study of Iranian nationalism in nearly five decades, it will find an eager readership among scholars of the Middle East and those students more generally interested in questions of nationalism and ideology.

Cultural Development of Mathematical Ideas

by Geoffrey B. Saxe Indigo Esmonde

Drawing upon field studies conducted in 1978, 1980, and 2001 with the Oksapmin, a remote Papua New Guinea group, Geoffrey B. Saxe traces the emergence of new forms of numerical representations and ideas in the social history of the community. In traditional life, the Oksapmin used a counting system that makes use of twenty-seven parts of the body; there is no evidence that the group used arithmetic in prehistory. As practices of economic exchange and schooling have shifted, children and adults unwittingly reproduced and altered the system in order to solve new kinds of numerical and arithmetical problems, a process that has led to new forms of collective representations in the community. While Dr. Saxe's focus is on the Oksapmin, the insights and general framework he provides are useful for understanding shifting representational forms and emerging cognitive functions in any human community.

Childhood Leukemias

by Ching-Hon Pui

New insights into the molecular biology of childhood leukemias have stimulated numerous advances in diagnostic methods, strategies for risk assessment and the development of novel therapy for genetic subtypes of the diseases. Fully revised and updated, this new edition of Childhood Leukemias provides the most comprehensive, clinically-oriented and authoritative reference dedicated to these diseases. Beginning with an overview of history, cell biology, and pathology, subsequent chapters review approaches in the evaluation and management of specific leukemias, new therapeutic development and the unique pharmacodynamics and pharmacogenetics of individual patients. New chapters include epigenetics of leukemias, leukemias in patients with Down syndrome and leukemia in adolescents and young adults. The final section covers the complications associated with the disease or its treatment and supportive care during and after treatment. Authored by leading experts, this is a 'must-have' for any physician or investigator who deals with leukemias in childhood.

Teaching, Learning, and Visual Literacy

by Billie Eilam

Visual literacy is an increasingly critical skill in a globalizing, digital world. This book addresses the core issues concerning visual literacy in education, underscoring its importance for the instruction of students and educators. Professor Billie Eilam argues that the incorporation of visual skill development in teacher training programs will help break the cycle of visual illiteracy. Understanding the pedagogical benefits and risks of visual representation can help educators develop effective strategies to produce visually literate students. Eilam presents a broad overview of theoretical knowledge regarding visual representation, as well as a discussion of best practices for the use of visual elements in schools. In addition to theory, Eilam includes practical exercises for introducing visual literacy into teacher education, offering strategies for analyzing visualization in curricula and for increasing awareness of visual culture.

Paleontology

by Derek Turner

In the wake of the paleobiological revolution of the 1970s and 1980s, paleontologists continue to investigate far-reaching questions about how evolution works. Many of those questions have a philosophical dimension. How is macroevolution related to evolutionary changes within populations? Is evolutionary history contingent? How much can we know about the causes of evolutionary trends? How do paleontologists read the patterns in the fossil record to learn about the underlying evolutionary processes? Derek Turner explores these and other questions, introducing the reader to exciting recent work in the philosophy of paleontology and to theoretical issues including punctuated equilibria and species selection. He also critically examines some of the major accomplishments and arguments of paleontologists of the last 40 years.

The Earth's Best Story

by Ron Arnie Koss

The Earth's Best Story tells how Ron and Arnie Koss succeeded in creating the first nationally distributed organic foods company to sit next to its mainstream competition on supermarket shelves-a step that revolutionized and empowered the organic-foods movement as a whole-and benefited hundreds of farmers as well as the millions of babies whose very first foods have been organically grown, thanks to Earth's Best. The Koss brothers, Ron and Arnie, had been sprout growers, broommakers, tool restorers, butlers, and natural-foods clerks, yet raised millions of dollars to start the first organic baby food company in the United States. How unlikely was that? The Earth's Best Story is a bittersweet tale about the founding of Earth's Best Baby Foods. Told through the dual narrative of each brother, this is not a business tome, although it is rich in entrepreneurial lessons and know-how. Rather, it's more like a "how to," "how not to," and "how they did it" memoir. it's personal, it's intense, it's inspirational, and it's full of reflections and tales of wonder and woe. People of every imaginable background and station in life want to make a difference with their lives. But how do you effectively do that? How does an idea successfully journey across the wastelands separating fantasy and reality? the Koss brothers take the reader on this journey. Theirs is a tale of idealism, naivetÉ, and possibility that reflects the quest to find a place in this world by somehow changing it For The better.

The People v. Bush

by Charlotte Dennett

When journalist-turned-lawyer Charlotte Dennett became outraged that Bush White House officials were acting above the law, she did something that surprised even herself. She ran for a state attorney general seat on a platform to prosecute George W. Bush for murder. She lost the race, but found a movement-one that continues its quest to hold leaders accountable to U. S. law and preserve a Constitutional presidency. In The People v. Bush, Dennett recounts her seminal effort to prosecute the former president, introduces readers to a world where the actions of a few can indeed empower the many, and reports on the current state of the movement to hold Bush accountable for high crimes and misdemeanors. Dennett's wild ride through politics began when she read The Prosecution of George W. Bush for Murder by lawyer Vincent Bugliosi (best known for his prosecution of Charles Manson). In it, Bugliosi stated that one path to prosecuting George W. Bush could be taken by a state attorney general-should one take up the cause. Soon after, Dennett launched her attorney-general race in Vermont-a state known as much for its progressive edge as its pioneering spirit-signed up Bugliosi as her special prosecutor in the event that she won, and together the two made headlines across Vermont and the nation for changing the face of American grassroots democracy. Dennett's book also explores the political triumphs of other Vermonters such as Kurt Daims, who imagined, with two human rights lawyers, Bush's arrest should he enter the town of Brattleboro; Dan DeWalt, who launched a call for impeachment in thirty-six towns; and Vermont Senator Patrick Leahy, who received wide support-but also criticism-for his 9/11 Truth Commission. With these stories and her own, Dennett shows that it's not just possible but necessary to hold higher-ups responsible for heinous acts-not out of revenge, but to preserve justice.

Radical Homemakers

by Shannon Hayes

Mother Nature has shown her hand. Faced with climate change, dwindling resources, and species extinctions, most Americans understand the fundamental steps necessary to solve our global crises-drive less, consume less, increase self-reliance, buy locally, eat locally, rebuild our local communities. In essence, the great work we face requires rekindling the home fires. Radical Homemakersis about men and women across the U. S. who focus on home and hearth as a political and ecological act, and who have centered their lives around family and community for personal fulfillment and cultural change. It explores what domesticity looks like in an era that has benefited from feminism, where domination and oppression are cast aside and where the choice to stay home is no longer equated with mind-numbing drudgery, economic insecurity, or relentless servitude. Radical Homemakersnationwide speak about empowerment, transformation, happiness, and casting aside the pressures of a consumer culture to live in a world where money loses its power to relationships, independent thought, and creativity. If you ever considered quitting a job to plant tomatoes, read to a child, pursue creative work, can green beans and heal the planet, this is your book.

The Raw Milk Revolution

by David E. Gumpert

Beginning in 2006, the agriculture departments of several large states-with backing from the U. S. Food and Drug Administration-launched a major crackdown on small dairies producing raw milk. Replete with undercover agents, sting operations, surprise raids, questionable test-lab results, propaganda blitzes, and grand jury investigations, the crackdown was designed to disrupt the supply of unpasteurized milk to growing legions of consumers demanding healthier and more flavorful food. The Raw Milk Revolution takes readers behind the scenes of the government's tough and occasionally brutal intimidation tactics, as seen through the eyes of milk producers, government regulators, scientists, prosecutors, and consumers. It is a disturbing story involving marginally legal police tactics and investigation techniques, with young children used as political pawns in a highly charged atmosphere of fear and retribution. Are regulators' claims that raw milk poses a public health threat legitimate? In assessing the threat, The Raw Milk Revolution reveals that the government's campaign, ostensibly designed to protect consumers from pathogens like salmonella, E. coli 0157:H7, and listeria, was based in a number of cases on suspect laboratory findings and illnesses attributed to raw milk that could well have had other causes. David Gumpert dares to ask whether regulators have the public's interest in mind or the economic interests of dairy conglomerates. The Raw Milk Revolution provides an unsettling view of the future, in which nutritionally dense foods may be available largely through underground channels.

Waiting on a Train

by James Mccommons

During the tumultuous year of 2008-when gas prices reached $4 a gallon, Amtrak set ridership records, and a commuter train collided with a freight train in California-journalist James McCommons spent a year on America's trains, talking to the people who ride and work the rails throughout much of the Amtrak system. Organized around these rail journeys, Waiting on a Train is equal parts travel narrative, personal memoir, and investigative journalism. Readers meet the historians, railroad executives, transportation officials, politicians, government regulators, railroad lobbyists, and passenger-rail advocates who are rallying around a simple question: Why has the greatest railroad nation in the world turned its back on the very form of transportation that made modern life and mobility possible? Distrust of railroads in the nineteenth century, overregulation in the twentieth, and heavy government subsidies for airports and roads have left the country with a skeletal intercity passenger-rail system. Amtrak has endured for decades, and yet failed to prosper owing to a lack of political and financial support and an uneasy relationship with the big, remaining railroads. While riding the rails, McCommons explores how the country may move passenger rail forward in America-and what role government should play in creating and funding mass-transportation systems. Against the backdrop of the nation's stimulus program, he explores what it will take to build high-speed trains and transportation networks, and when the promise of rail will be realized in America.

The Organic Farmer's Business Handbook

by Richard Wiswall

Contrary to popular belief, a good living can be made on an organic farm. What's required is farming smarter, not harder. InThe Organic Farmer's Business Handbook, Richard Wiswall shares advice on how to make your vegetable production more efficient, better manage your employees and finances, and turn a profit. From his twenty-seven years of experience at Cate Farm in Vermont, Wiswall knows firsthand the joys of starting and operating an organic farm-as well as the challenges of making a living from one. Farming offers fundamental satisfaction from producing food, working outdoors, being one's own boss, and working intimately with nature. But, unfortunately, many farmers avoid learning about the business end of farming; because of this, they often work harder than they need to, or quit farming altogether because of frustrating-and often avoidable-losses. In this comprehensive business kit, Wiswall covers: Step-by-step procedures to make your crop production more efficient Advice on managing employees, farm operations, and office systems Novel marketing strategies What to do with your profits: business spending, investing, and planning for retirement A companion CD offers valuable business tools, including easy-to-use spreadsheets for projecting cash flow, a payroll calculator, comprehensive crop budgets for twenty-four different crops, and tax planners.

Sustainable Food: How to Buy Right and Spend Less

by Elise Mcdonough

Wondering whether it's worth it to splurge on the locally raised beef? What about those organic carrots? New in the Chelsea Green Guides series, Sustainable Food: How to Buy Right and Spend Less helps the average shopper navigate the choices, whether strolling the aisles of a modern supermarket or foraging at a local farmers market. This down-to-earth, casual guide-small enough to be slipped into your pocket-answers these and other questions for the shopper: * What are the differences among organic, local, fair-trade, free-range, naturally raised, and biodynamic foods? * How affordable is it to subscribe to a CSA farm-and what are the advantages? * Is it better to choose wild Alaskan salmon at $18. 99, or the Chilean farmed fish at $11. 99? * What cooking oils can be sustainably sourced? * How can a food co-op increase access to, and affordability of, healthier, Earth-friendly foods? * Where can you find sustainably produced sugar, and are there any local replacements for sweeteners from faraway lands? * What do the distinctions between shade-grown and trellised coffee mean? * Is shark okay to eat? How about mackerel? * Why is the war on plastic bags so important? Sustainable eating just got easier.

Nontoxic Housecleaning

by Amy Kolb Noyes

When it comes to cleaning products, society often values convenience over personal and planetary health, thanks to decades of advertising propaganda from the chemical companies that market overpriced and dangerous concoctions. But awareness is changing: Not only are homemade and nontoxic cleaners strong enough for the toughest grunge, they are often as convenient as their commercial counterparts. Nontoxic Housecleaning-the latest in the Chelsea Green Guide series-provides a way for people to improve their immediate environment every day. Pregnant women, parents of young children, pet owners, people with health concerns, and those who simply care about a healthy environment-and a sensible budget-can all benefit from the recipes and tips in this guide.

Walking with the Great Apes

by Sy Montgomery

Three astounding women scientists have in recent years penetrated the jungles of Africa and Borneo to observe, nurture, and defend humanity's closest cousins. Jane Goodall has worked with the chimpanzees of Gombe for nearly 50 years; Dian Fossey died in 1985 defending the mountain gorillas of Rwanda; and Biruteacute; Galdikas lives in intimate proximity to the orangutans of Borneo. All three began their work as proteacute;geacute;es of the great Anglo-African archeologist Louis Leakey, and each spent years in the field, allowing the apes to become their familiars-and ultimately waging battles to save them from extinction in the wild. Their combined accomplishments have been mind-blowing, as Goodall, Fossey, and Galdikas forever changed how we think of our closest evolutionary relatives, of ourselves, and of how to conduct good science. From the personal to the primate, Sy Montgomery explores the science, wisdom, and living experience of three of the greatest scientists of the twentieth century.

Osman's Dream

by Caroline Finkel

According to the Ottoman chronicles, the first sultan, Osman, had a dream in which a tree emerged fully formed from his navel "and its shade compassed the world"-symbolizing the vast empire he and his descendants were destined to forge. His vision was soon realized: At its height, the Ottoman realm extended from Hungary to the Persian Gulf, from North Africa to the Caucasus. The Ottoman Empire was one of the largest and most influential empires in world history. For centuries, Europe watched with fear as the Ottomans steadily advanced their rule across the Balkans. Yet travelers and merchants were irresistibly drawn toward Ottoman lands by their fascination with the Orient and the lure of profit. Although it survived for over six centuries, the history of the Ottoman Empire is too often colored by the memory of its bloody final throes. In this magisterial work Caroline Finkel lucidly recounts the epic story of the Ottoman Empire from its origins in the thirteenth century through its destruction on the battlefields of World War I.

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