Browse Results What Format Should I Choose?

Showing 41,476 through 41,500 of 112,434 results

Ghouls, Ghouls, Ghouls

by Victoria Laurie

When M. J. and the crew of her cable TV show, 'Ghoul Getters', venture to the haunted ruins of Dunlow Castle in Ireland, they hope that the road will rise up to meet them, that the wind will always be at their backs, that the sun will warm up their faces. . . and that the resident phantom won't push them off a cliff. That is what has befallen others drawn to the castle by the legend of hidden treasure. Dunlow has more spooks than turrets, but theyall pale in comparison to the phantom. . .

Ride the High Range

by West Charles G.

Young Jim Moran never had a real family-but his sense of honor and razor-sharp instincts earned him a loyal partner who gave him a second chance, a home with a Montana Indian tribe, and a new name: Rider Twelve Horses. And when his friend is brutalized by a trio of killers, nothing can stop Rider's merciless search for justice. .

Ralph Compton The Burning Range

by Ralph Compton

A plague of killings has descended on Green Meadow, Oklahoma. A villain called the Fat Man wants the town-and the black gold beneath it-and he's willing to wipe out every man, woman, and child to get it. Only two underdogs stand in his way: seedy gambler Chauncey Drake, and scrappy Pinkerton agent Reuben Withers. Together they'll need to force- feed the Fat Man a steady diet of hot lead, or Green Meadow will flow red. .

Outrageously Yours

by Allison Chase

A precious gem gifted to Queen Victoria by her secret beau has been stolen, and Her Majesty believes it has been delivered into the hands of the Marquess of Harrow. Ivy Sutherland's task is to assume the role of science student, "Ned Ivers", win the Marquess's trust, and recover the stone. But when Simon de Burgh, Marquess of Harrow-and a lonely widower-discovers "Ned" is actually a woman, he is unable to resist his growing desire for her. .

One Grave Less

by Beverly Connor

Long ago, forensic anthropologist Diane Fallon served in South America at the World Accord International. Years later, haunted by the massacres a continent away, she has been trying hard to put the past behind her. Until now. . . Working late at her museum, Diane hears a terrified cry that leads her to an injured man ? and recognises him as a fellow WAI staffer from her days in South America. Clutching a child's femur in his hands, he whispers, 'It was one of us. . . ' and dies. Now Diane is faced with some deadly questions ? why was her former colleague trying to visit her? Why did he carry a human bone? Who did he mean by 'us', and just who attacked him? More importantly, is Diane the next on the list?

If Walls Could Talk

by Juliet Blackwell

Melanie Turner has made quite a name for herself remodeling historic houses in the San Francisco Bay Area. But now her reputation may be on the line. At her newest project, a run-down Pacific Heights mansion, Mel is visited by the ghost of a colleague who recently met a bad end with power tools. Mel hopes that by nailing the killer, she can rid herself of the ghostly presence of the murdered man-and not end up a construction casualty herself. . . .

In the Company of Vampires

by Katie Macalister

When Francesca arrives at GothFaire to save her mother from the trickster god, Loki, things go from bad to worse. Her immortal ex, Benedikt, is there, full of secrets-and with a new girlfriend. Now Fran must battle a power-hungry group who wishes to dominate both the immortal and mortal worlds-and the woman who claimed Ben's heart. It's a good thing Fran's no ordinary mortal. . .

Who Was Jackie Robinson?

by John Harrison O'Brien Nancy Gail Herman

As a kid, Jackie Robinson loved sports. And why not? He was a natural at football, basketball, and, of course, baseball. But beyond athletic skill, it was his strength of character that secured his place in sports history. In 1947 Jackie joined the Brooklyn Dodgers, breaking the long-time color barrier in major league baseball. It was tough being first- not only did "fans" send hate mail but some of his own teammates refused to accept him. Here is an inspiring sports biography, with black-and-white illustrations throughout. .

His Father's Son

by Tom Callahan

Ever since he was a two-year-old golf prodigy, Eldrick 'Tiger' Woods has often been viewed less as a human being and more as a ball-striking machine - and his carefully guarded image and emotionless persona seemed to guarantee that it would remain that way. Even after his recent bombshell adultery scandal, the public still knows very little about the man behind the golf clubs and multimillion-dollar endorsement deals. But one thing is certain: Earl Woods, Tiger's beloved and now deceased father, knew him better and influenced his life more than anyone. To know the father is to know the son. With unparalleled insight into the man who made Tiger Woods the person that he is, His Father's Son is both a detailed biography and a touching story of an intense father-and-son relationship.

Selected Stories

by William Trevor

Selected as one of The New York Times Book Review's 10 Best Books of the Year. Four-time winner of the O. Henry Prize, three-time winner of the Whitbread Award, and five-time nominee for the Booker Prize, William Trevor is one of the most acclaimed authors of our era. Over a career spanning more than half a century, Trevor has crafted exquisitely rendered tales that brilliantly illuminate the human condition. A powerful collection by "the greatest living writer of short stories in the English language" (The New Yorker), Selected Stories brings together forty-eight stories from After Rain, The Hill Bachelors, A Bit on the Side, and Cheating at Canasta. .

Tangled Webs

by Stewart James B.

A Tangled Web is an eclectic gather of poetry on all phases of human life, the good, the bad, and all in between.

In Too Deep

by Krentz Jayne Ann

Jayne Ann Krentz follows up her highly successful Dreamlight Trilogy written in collaboration with her two alter egos, Amanda Quick and Jayne Castle with a brand-new story arc that begins in a secluded coastal town in northern California. Scargill Cove is the perfect place for Fallon Jones, confirmed recluse and investigator of the paranormal. Its a hot spot, a convergence point for unusually strong currents of energy, which might explain why the town attracts misfits and drifters like moths to a flame. Now someone else has been drawn to the Cove Isabella Valdez, on the run from some very dangerous men. When she starts working as Fallons assistant, Isabella impresses him by organizing his pathologically chaotic office and doesnt bat an eye at the psychic element of his job. Shes a kindred spirit, a sanctuary from a world that considers his talents a form of madness. But after a routine case unearths an antique clock infused with dark energy, Fallon and Isabella are dragged into the secret history of Scargill Cove and forced to fight for their lives, as they unravel a cutthroat conspiracy with roots in the Jones family businessand Isabellas family tree.

Transition: Becoming Who I Was Always Meant to Be

by Billie Fitzpatrick Chaz Bono

The world first met Chaz Bono as Sonny and Cher's cherubic blonde daughter. But Chaz feels no connection with that little girl. Instead, he remembers growing up in the public eye feeling that his whole existence was a lie. Even after coming out as a lesbian, Chaz still felt unfulfilled. Finally, after struggling with gender confusion, failed relationships, the loss of a parent, drug addiction and a slow journey towards sobriety, Chaz began taking hormones to begin his transition from female to male. An inspirational and riveting tale.

The Silver Boat

by Luanne Rice

Bestseller Luanne Rice returns with a novel as timeless as the sea on which it's set. From the beloved New York Times bestselling Luanne Rice comes a heartwarming yet heart-wrenching portrait of three far-flung sisters who come home to Martha's Vineyard one last time. Their mother's beach house is the only place any of them ever found true happiness and they need to begin the difficult process of letting go. Memories of their grandmother, mother, and their Irish father, who sailed away the year Dar turned twelve, rise up and expose the fine cracks in their family myth-especially when a cache of old letters reveals enough truth to send them back to their ancestral homeland. Transplanted into the unfamiliar, each sister sees life, her heart, and her relationship to home in a new way. But how do they let go of a place that contains the complicated love of their imperfect family? Without the house, where will they be together? The novel is a season on Martha's Vineyard; a mission to Ireland; a cast of friends, including one wildly off-the-grid Zen genius; passionate love in the surf; and three very different sisters with lives filled with beauty, sorrow, and deep love they'd never been quite sure they could trust. The Silver Boat is Luanne Rice at her very best, complete with her singular talent for capturing a family in all its flawed complexity. .

Idea Man: A Memoir by the Cofounder of Microsoft

by Paul Allen

"The entire conversation took five minutes. When it was over, Bill and I looked at each other. It was one thing to talk about writing a language for a microprocessor and another to get the job done.... If we'd been older or known better, Bill and I might have been put off by the task in front of us. But we were young and green enough to believe that we just might pull it off. " Paul Allen, best known as the cofounder of Microsoft, has left his mark on numerous fields, from aviation and science to rock 'n' roll, professional sports, and philanthropy. His passions and curiosity have transformed the way we live. In 2007 and again in 2008, Time named him one of the hundred most influential people in the world. It all started on a snowy day in December 1974, when he was twenty-one years old. After buying the new issue of Popular Electronics in Harvard Square, Allen ran to show it to his best friend from Seattle, Bill Gates, then a Harvard undergrad. The magazine's cover story featured the Altair 8800, the first true personal computer; Allen knew that he and Gates had the skills to code a programming language for it. When Gates agreed to collaborate on BASIC for the Altair, one of the most influential partnerships in the digital era was up and running. While much has been written about Microsoft's early years, Allen has never before told the story from his point of view. Nor has he previously talked about the details of his complex relationship with Gates or his behind-closed-doors perspective on how a struggling start-up became the most powerful technology company in the world. Idea Man is the candid and long-awaited memoir of an intensely private person, a tale of triumphant highs and terrifying lows. After becoming seriously ill with Hodgkin's lymphoma in 1982, Allen began scaling back his involvement with Microsoft. He recovered and started using his fortune--and his ideas--for a life of adventure and discovery, from the first privately funded spacecraft (SpaceShipOne) to a landmark breakthrough in neuroscience (the Allen Brain Atlas). His eclectic ventures all begin with the same simple question: What should exist? As Allen has written: To me, that's the most exciting question imaginable.... From technology to science to music to art, I'm inspired by those who've blurred the boundaries, who've looked at the possibilities, and said, "What if...?" In my own work, I've tried to anticipate what's coming over the horizon, to hasten its arrival, and to apply it to people's lives in a meaningful way...The varied possibilities of the universe have dazzled me since I was a child, and they continue to drive my work, my investments, and my philanthropy. Idea Man is an astonishing true story of ideas made real. .

Toxicology

by Jessica Hagedorn

"Highly entertaining. . . [Hagedorn] is an exceptional storyteller. " -The Boston Globe Jessica Hagedorn's ferociously entertaining new novel centers on two women who are neighbors in Manhattan's West Village: Mimi Smith, a filmmaker whose only screen credit is a notorious low-budget slasher movie, and Eleanor Delacroix, a legendary, scandalous literary figure now nearing eighty. Their personal and artistic lives begin to converge in unexpected ways as Eleanor grieves over the death of her longtime lover, the renowned painter Yvonne Wilder, and as Mimi confronts the challenges presented by the mysterious disappearance of her boyfriend, by her newly sober if still somewhat loopy brother, and by her wayward teenage daughter. Toxicology is a fearless, playful, and savagely funny novel about the collision of art, fame, money, love, desire, and mortality. .

The Returning

by Christine Hinwood

An engrossing epic tale with a cast of characters that will hijack your heart. Cam Attling, having lost an arm, is the only one from his town of Kayforl to return after twelve years of war. All his fellow soldiers were slain, and suspicion surrounds him. When his betrothal to Graceful Fenister is called off and his role in the community questioned, Cam leaves to find the lord who maimed him but spared his life, seeking answers and a new place in the world. But this is not just Cam's story, it's about all those whose fates entwine with his. Set in a medieval world that is entirely the author's creation, this is an ingenious, exquisite story about what happens after the battle. When sisters, sons, friends, parents, and lovers are left to deal with the subtle aftermaths and unimagined repercussions of war. .

The Narrow Road

by Felix Dennis

Felix Dennis is one of Britain's wealthiest self-made entrepreneurs. And it's safe to assume that he didn't reach this pinnacle by simply reading about how to get rich. He went out and did it. Appreciating that those amongst us intent on being rich will not have the time or inclination to read page upon page of advice and guidance on the subject, Felix Dennis has now compiled a short book u a tool, rather than an armchair diversion u that distils his own business wisdom down to 88 pithy tenets of wealth, all written in his own inimitable style. 88: Journeys on the Narrow Road is an inspirational guide for those amongst us determined to attempt the getting of money, for those who will not confuse reading with doing, for those who seek the narrow road.

The Compass of Pleasure

by David J. Linden

From the New York Times bestselling author comes a "hugely entertaining" (NPR. org) look at vice and virtue through cutting-edge science As he did in his award-winning book The Accidental Mind, David J. Linden--highly regarded neuroscientist, professor, and writer--weaves empirical science with entertaining anecdotes to explain how the gamut of behaviors that give us a buzz actually operates. The Compass of Pleasure makes clear why drugs like nicotine and heroin are addictive while LSD is not, how fast food restaurants ensure that diners will eat more, why some people cannot resist the appeal of a new sexual encounter, and much more. Provocative and illuminating, this is a radically new and thorough look at the desires that define us. .

Obliquity

by John Kay

A leading economist charts the indirect road to happiness and wealth. Using dozens of practical examples from the worlds of business, politics, science, sports, literature, even parenting, esteemed economist John Kay proves a notion that feels at once paradoxical and deeply commonsensical: The best way to achieve any complex or broadly defined goal-from happiness to wealth to profit to preventing forest fires-is the indirect way. As Kay points out, we rarely know enough about the intricacies of important problems to tackle them head-on. And our unpredictable interactions with other people and the world at large mean that the path to our goals-and sometimes the goals themselves-will inevitably change. We can learn about our objectives and how to achieve them only through a gradual process of risk taking and discovery-what Kay calls obliquity. Kay traces this pathway to satisfaction as it manifests itself in nearly every aspect of life. The wealthiest people-from Andrew Carnegie to Bill Gates-achieved their riches through a passion for their work, not because they set materialistic goals. Research has shown that companies whose goal (as declared in mission statements) is excellent products or service are more profitable than companies whose stated goal is increasing profits. In the personal realm, a large body of evidence shows that parenthood is on a daily basis far more frustrating than happy- making. Yet parents are statistically happier than nonparents. Though their short-term pleasure is often thwarted by the demands of childrearing, the subtle-oblique-rewards of parenthood ultimately make them happier. Once he establishes the ubiquity of obliquity, Kay offers a wealth of practical guidance for avoiding the traps laid by the direct approach to complex problems. Directness blinds us to new information that contradicts our presumptions, fools us into confusing logic with truth, cuts us off from our intuition (which is the subconscious expression of our experience), shunts us away from alternative solutions that may be better than the one we're set on, and more. Kay also shows us how to acknowledge our limitations, redefine our goals to fit our skills, open our minds to new data and solutions, and otherwise live life with obliquity. This bracing manifesto will convince listeners-or confirm their conviction-that the best route to satisfaction and success does not run through the bottom line.

More Than Good Intentions

by Dean Karlan Jacob Appel

A leading economist and researcher report from the front lines of a revolution in solving the world's most persistent problem. When it comes to global poverty, people are passionate and polarized. At one extreme: We just need to invest more resources. At the other: We've thrown billions down a sinkhole over the last fifty years and accomplished almost nothing. Dean Karlan and Jacob Appel present an entirely new approach that blazes an optimistic and realistic trail between these two extremes. In this pioneering book Karlan and Appel combine behavioral economics with worldwide field research. They take readers with them into villages across Africa, India, South America, and the Philippines, where economic theory collides with real life. They show how small changes in banking, insurance, health care, and other development initiatives that take into account human irrationality can drastically improve the well-being of poor people everywhere. We in the developed world have found ways to make our own lives profoundly better. We use new tools to spend smarter, save more, eat better, and lead lives more like the ones we imagine. These tools can do the same for the impoverished. Karlan and Appel's research, and those of some close colleagues, show exactly how. In America alone, individual donors contribute over two hundred billion to charity annually, three times as much as corporations, foundations, and bequests combined. This book provides a new way to understand what really works to reduce poverty; in so doing, it reveals how to better invest those billions and begin transforming the well-being of the world. .

Malled

by Caitlin Kelly

One woman's midcareer misadventures in the absurd world of American retail. After losing her job as a journalist and the security of a good salary, Caitlin Kelly was hard up for cash. When she saw that The North Face-an upscale outdoor clothing company-was hiring at her local mall, she went for an interview almost on a whim. Suddenly she found herself, middle-aged and mid-career, thrown headfirst into the bizarre alternate reality of the American mall: a world of low-wage workers selling overpriced goods to well-to-do customers. At first, Kelly found her part-time job fun and reaffirming, a way to maintain her sanity and sense of self-worth. But she describes how the unexpected physical pressures, the unreasonable dictates of a remote corporate bureaucracy, and the dead-end career path eventually took their toll. As she struggled through more than two years at the mall, despite surgeries, customer abuse, and corporate inanity, Kelly gained a deeper understanding of the plight of the retail worker. In the tradition of Nickel and Dimed, Malled challenges our assumptions about the world of retail, documenting one woman's struggle to find meaningful work in a broken system. .

Can I See Your I.D.?: True Stories of False Identities

by Paul Barton Chris Hoppe

True crime, desperation, fraud, and adventure: From the impoverished young woman who enchanted nineteenth-century British society as a faux Asian princess, to the sixteen-year-old boy who "stole" a subway train in 1993, to the lonely but clever Frank Abagnale of Catch Me if You Can fame, these ten vignettes offer riveting insight into mind-blowing masquerades. Graphic panels draw you into the exploits of these pretenders, and meticulously researched details keep you on the edge of your seat. Each scene is presented in the second person, a unique point of view that literally places you inside the faker's mind. With motivations that include survival, delusion, and plain, old-fashioned greed, the psychology of deception has never been so fascinating or so close at hand.

Biopunk

by Marcus Wohlsen

Bill Gates recently told Wired that if he were a teenager today, he would be hacking biology. "If you want to change the world in some big way," he says, "that's where you should start-biological molecules. " The most disruptive force on the planet resides in DNA. Biotech companies and academic researchers are just beginning to unlock the potential of piecing together life from scratch. Champions of synthetic biology believe that turning genetic code into Lego-like blocks to build never-before-seen organisms could solve the thorniest challenges in medicine, energy, and environmental protection. But as the hackers who cracked open the potential of the personal computer and the Internet proved, the most revolutionary discoveries often emerge from out-of-the-way places, forged by brilliant outsiders with few resources besides boundless energy and great ideas. In Biopunk, Marcus Wohlsen chronicles a growing community of DIY scientists working outside the walls of corporations and universities who are committed to democratizing DNA the way the Internet did information. The "biohacking" movement, now in its early, heady days, aims to unleash an outbreak of genetically modified innovation by making the tools and techniques of biotechnology accessible to everyone. Borrowing their idealism from the worlds of open-source software, artisinal food, Internet startups, and the Peace Corps, biopunks are devoted advocates for open-sourcing the basic code of life. They believe in the power of individuals with access to DNA to solve the world's biggest problems. You'll meet a new breed of hackers who aren't afraid to get their hands wet, from entrepreneurs who aim to bring DNA-based medical tools to the poorest of the poor to a curious tinkerer who believes a tub of yogurt and a jellyfish gene could protect the world's food supply. These biohackers include: - A duo who started a cancer drug company in their kitchen - A team who built an open-source DNA copy machine - A woman who developed a genetic test in her apartment for a deadly disease that had stricken her family Along with the potential of citizen science to bring about disruptive change, Wohlsen explores the risks of DIY bioterrorism, the possibility of genetic engineering experiments gone awry, and whether the ability to design life from scratch on a laptop might come sooner than we think. .

Attachments

by Rainbow Rowell

It's 1999 in a Nebraskan newspaper office and for staff, the internet and email is still a novelty. Management is panicking: 'giving employees Internet access was like giving them the option to work if they feel like it, look at porn if they don't'. Enter Lincoln, a shy, lonely IT guy, with the thankless task of monitoring employees' emails on the night shift. By day, two young women, Beth and Jennifer, spend their hours emailing each other, discussing in hilarious detail every aspect of their lives, from boyfriend troubles, to family dramas, to reminiscing about their college days. And by night, Lincoln spends his hours reading every exchange. At first their emails offer a welcome diversion, but as Lincoln unwittingly becomes drawn into their lives, the more he reads, the more he finds himself falling for one of them. A funny, sweet and irresistible romantic comedy, FLAGGED is a novel about friendship, the peculiar patterns of office life and the perils of love.

Showing 41,476 through 41,500 of 112,434 results

Help

Select your format based upon: 1) how you want to read your book, and 2) compatibility with your reading tool. To learn more about using Bookshare with your device, visit the "Using Bookshare" page in the Help Center.

Here is an overview of the specialized formats that Bookshare offers its members with links that go to the Help Center for more information.

  • Bookshare Web Reader - a customized reading tool for Bookshare members offering all the features of DAISY with a single click of the "Read Now" link.
  • DAISY (Digital Accessible Information System) - a digital book file format. DAISY books from Bookshare are DAISY 3.0 text files that work with just about every type of access technology that reads text. Books that contain images will have the download option of ‘DAISY Text with Images’.
  • BRF (Braille Refreshable Format) - digital Braille for use with refreshable Braille devices and Braille embossers.
  • MP3 (Mpeg audio layer 3) - Provides audio only with no text. These books are created with a text-to-speech engine and spoken by Kendra, a high quality synthetic voice from Ivona. Any device that supports MP3 playback is compatible.
  • DAISY Audio - Similar to the Daisy 3.0 option above; however, this option uses MP3 files created with our text-to-speech engine that utilizes Ivona's Kendra voice. This format will work with Daisy Audio compatible players such as Victor Reader Stream and Read2Go.