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Bound to Last

by Sean Manning

Lovers of the printed book, arise! Thirty of today's top writers are here to tell you you're not alone. InBound to Last,an amazing array of authors comes to the passionate defense of the printed book with spirited,never-before-published essays celebrating the hardcover or paperback they hold most dear--not necessarily because of its contents, but because of its significance as a one-of-a-kind, irreplaceableobject. Whether focusing on the circumstances behind how a particular book was acquired, or how it has become forever "bound up" with a specific person, time, or place, each piece collected here confirms--poignantly, delightfully, irrefutably--that every book tells a story far beyond the one found within its pages. In addition to a foreword by Ray Bradbury,Bound to Lastfeatures original contributions by: Chris Abani, Rabih Alameddine, Anthony Doerr, Louis Ferrante, Nick Flynn, Karen Joy Fowler, Julia Glass, Karen Green, David Hajdu, Terrence Holt, Jim Knipfel, Shahriar Mandanipour, Sarah Manguso, Sean Manning, Joyce Maynard, Philipp Meyer, Jonathan Miles, Sigrid Nunez, Ed Park, Victoria Patterson, Francine Prose, Michael Ruhlman, Elissa Schappell, Christine Schutt, Jim Shepard, Susan Straight, J. Courtney Sullivan, Anthony Swofford, Danielle Trussoni, and Xu Xiaobin

FAB An Intimate Life of Paul McCartney

by Howard Sounes

Author of an exceptionally good biography of Bob Dylan, Sounes doesn't fare quite as well with this substantial volume on the life of Paul McCartney. While the author has obviously done his research, there's relatively little new of significance here, other than some details on McCartney's relationships. Unfortunately for the author, those who could have shed more light on McCartney as a musician and songwriter are either not talking (Ringo Starr) or unavailable for comment (John Lennon, George Harrison). While there is little (other than page count) to make Sounes' book stand apart from other recent McCartney bios, the author's lively style makes his book an interesting read. Published in the U. K. and Australia by HarperCollins 2010. Annotation ©2011 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

Blowing Smoke

by Michael Wolraich

HAS AMERICA LOST ITS MARBLES? Television sensation Glenn Beck warns of White House plots to institute fascism, communism, and other terrifying "isms. " Radio titan Rush Limbaugh charges that a racist Obama regime encourages black schoolchildren to beat up white kids. Evangelical luminary James Dobson frets that Christians will be arrested for thought crimes and people will be allowed to marry donkeys. Protesters in knickers and colonial-style hats march on Washington with signs that order Hitler-like caricatures of President Obama to return to Kenya. As madness reigns, pundits, politicians, and cab drivers debate the source of the hysteria. Some blame ignorance; some blame racism; some blame the economy. After poring over mountains of political screeds and heedlessly subjecting himself to countless hours of Fox News, author Michael Wolraich discovered the secret formula that turns ordinary men and women into fire-breathing, smoke-blowing, right wing maniacs. It's "persecution politics" . . again. InBlowing Smoke, Wolraich documents, dissects, and deconstructs the myths that underlie the right's growing reliance on the politics of persecution, from Joe McCarthy to the Tea Party movement. In the process, he delivers an original and compelling hypothesis with penetrating insight and blistering wit. At turns hilarious, disturbing, and edifying,Blowing Smokeis a must-read account of modern American politics.

A Very Irregular Head

by Rob Chapman

Syd Barrett was the lead guitarist, vocalist, and principle songwriter in the original line up of Pink Floyd. During his brief time with the band (1966-68) he was the driving force behind the unit. After he left the band he made just two further solo albums which were both released in 1970, before withdrawing from public view to lead a quiet, and occasionally troubled life in Cambridge, the town of his birth. Rob Chapman's book will be the first authoritative and exhaustively researched biography of Syd Barrett that fully celebrates his life and legacy as a musician, lyricist and artist, and which highlights the influence that he continues to have over contemporary bands and music fans alike.

Best Music Writing 2010

by Ann Powers

Best Music Writinghas become one of the most eagerly awaited annuals out there. Celebrating the year in music writing by gathering a rich array of essays, missives, and musings on every style of music from rock to hip-hop to R&B to jazz to pop to blues and more, it is essential reading for anyone who loves great music and accomplished writing. Scribes of every imaginable sort-novelists, poets, journalists, musicians-are gathered to create a multi-voiced snapshot of the year in music writing that, like the music it illuminates, is every bit as thrilling as it is riveting.

Lion of Liberty

by Harlow Giles Unger

Prolific author Unger (journalist, educator, and historian) offers a popular biography of the public and private life of Patrick Henry, the skilled orator, lawyer, and unrelenting advocate for liberty and freedom from government tyranny, both British and, later, American. The story that unfolds, flows because it isn't a dry analysis of Henry's beliefs and politics, but more accurately a compelling story that illustrates Henry's beliefs by centering on his actions and the events of his life. Annotation ©2011 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

The Great Fire of Rome

by Stephen Dando-Collins

The story of Nero fiddling while Rome burned is as familiar to most people as George Washington and the cherry tree. Historian and writer Dando-Collins argues that Nero's reputation is as apocryphal as George's. In this micro-history, Dando-Collins begins with the famous fire and looks at the career of Nero and the city of Rome for the next four years, from 64-68. The tale of the decline and fall of Nero is based on contemporary authors. Dando-Collins is aware of the bias of men like Tacitus, Suetonius, Seneca, Josephus and the authors of the New Testament. He also suspects that the story of Nero blaming the fire on the Christians is a later interpolation. His account is for general readers rather than scholars and Dando-Collins makes some assumptions of his own that he doesn't substantiate. Nevertheless, this is an excellent corrective to myth and a good introduction to first-century Roman history. Annotation ©2011 Book News, Inc. , Portland, OR (booknews. com)

Loving and Leaving the Good Life

by Helen Nearing

Helen and Scott Nearing, authors of "Living the Good Life" and many other bestselling books, lived together for 53 years until Scott's death at age 100. "Loving and Leaving the Good Life" is Helen's testimonial to their life together and to what they stood for: self-sufficiency, generosity, social justice, and peace. In 1932, after deciding it would be better to be poor in the country than in the city, Helen and Scott moved from New York City to Vermont. The Nearings moved to Maine in 1953, where they continued their hard physical work as homesteaders and their intense intellectual work promoting social justice. "Loving and Leaving the Good Life" is a vivid self-portrait of an independent, committed and gifted woman. It is also an eloquent statement of what it means to grow old and to face death quietly, peacefully, and in control. At 88, Helen seems content to be nearing the end of her good life. As she puts it, "To have partaken of and to have given love is the greatest of life's rewards. There seems never an end to the loving that goes on forever and ever. Loving and leaving are part of living. " Helen's death in 1995 at the age of 92 marks the end of an era. Yet as Helen writes in her remarkable memoir, "When one door closes, another opens. " As we search for a new understanding of the relationships between death and life, this book provides profound insights into the question of how we age and die.

Apathy for the Devil

by Nick Kent

Chronicling Nick Kent's up-close , personal, often harrowing adventures with the Rolling Stones, Lester Bangs, David Bowie, Led Zeppelin, the Sex Pistols, and Chrissie Hynde, among scores of others,Apathy for the Devilis a picaresque memoir that bears witness to the beautiful and the damned of this turbulent decade. As a college dropout barely out of his teens, Kent's first five interviews were with the MC5, Captain Beefheart, the Grateful Dead, the Stooges, and Lou Reed. But after the excitement and freedom of those early years, his story would come to mirror that of the decade itself, as he slipped into excess and ever-worsening heroin use. Apathy for the Devilis a compelling story of inspiration, success, burn out, and rebirth from a classic wordsmith.

Jewish Life in Twenty-First-Century Turkey

by Marcy Brink-Danan

Turkey is famed for a history of tolerance toward minorities, and there is a growing nostalgia for the "Ottoman mosaic." In this richly detailed study, Marcy Brink-Danan examines what it means for Jews to live as a tolerated minority in contemporary Istanbul. Often portrayed as the "good minority," Jews in Turkey celebrate their long history in the region, yet they are subject to discrimination and their institutions are regularly threatened and periodically attacked. Brink-Danan explores the contradictions and gaps in the popular ideology of Turkey as a land of tolerance, describing how Turkish Jews manage the tensions between cosmopolitanism and patriotism, difference as Jews and sameness as Turkish citizens, tolerance and violence.

Expressive Intersections in Brahms

by Peter H. Smith Heather Platt

Contributors to this exciting new volume examine the intersection of structure and meaning in Brahms's music, utilizing a wide range of approaches, from the theories of Schenker to the most recent analytical techniques. They combine various viewpoints with the semiotic-based approaches of Robert Hatten, and address many of the most important genres in which Brahms composed. The essays reveal the expressive power of a work through the comparison of specific passages in one piece to similar works and through other artistic realms such as literature and painting. The result of this intertextual re-framing is a new awareness of the meaningfulness of even Brahms's most "absolute" works.

David Baker

by Monika Herzig

A Living Jazz Legend, musician and composer David Baker has made a distinctive mark on the world of music in his nearly 60-year career--as player (chiefly on trombone and cello), composer, and educator. In this richly illustrated volume, Monika Herzig explores Baker's artistic legacy, from his days as a jazz musician in Indianapolis to his long-term gig as Distinguished Professor and Chairman of the Jazz Studies department at Indiana University. Baker's credits are striking: in the 1960s he was a member of George Russell's "out there" sextet and orchestra; by the 1980s he was in the jazz educator's hall of fame. His compositions have been recorded by performers as diverse as Dexter Gordon and Janos Starker, the Beaux Arts Trio, the Composer's String Quartet and the Czech Philharmonic. Featuring enlightening interviews with Baker and a CD of unreleased recordings and Baker compositions, this book brings a jazz legend into clear view.

An Unreal Estate

by Lucinda Carspecken

In An Unreal Estate, Lucinda Carspecken takes an in-depth look at Lothlorien, a Southern Indiana nature sanctuary, sustainable camping ground, festival site, collective residence, and experiment in ecological building, stewardship, and organization. Carspecken notes the way fiction and reality intertwine on this piece of land and argues that examples such as Lothlorien have the power to be a force for social change. Lothlorien's organization and social norms are in sharp contrast with its surrounding communities. As a unique enclave within a larger society, it offers to the latter both an implicit critique and a cluster of alternative values and lifestyles. In addition, it has created a niche where some participants change, grow, and find empowerment in an environment that is accepting of difference--particularly in areas of religion and sexual orientation.

Music and the Politics of Negation

by James R. Currie

Over the past quarter century, music studies in the academy have their postmodern credentials by insisting that our scholarly engagements start and end by placing music firmly within its various historical and social contexts. In Music and the Politics of Negation, James R. Currie sets out to disturb the validity of this now quite orthodox claim. Alternating dialectically between analytic and historical investigations into the late 18th century and the present, he poses a set of uncomfortable questions regarding the limits and complicities of the values that the academy keeps in circulation by means of its musical encounters. His overriding thesis is that the forces that have formed us are not our fate.

Habitats and Ecological Communities of Indiana

by Jr. John O. Whitaker Jr. Charles J. Amlaner Jr. George R. Parker Peter E. Scott Marion T. Jackson

In Habitats and Ecological Communities of Indiana, leading experts assess the health and diversity of Indiana's eight wildlife habitats, providing detailed analysis, data-generated maps, color photographs, and complete lists of flora and fauna. This groundbreaking reference details the state's forests, grasslands, wetlands, aquatic systems, barren lands, and subterranean systems, and describes the nature and impact of two man-made habitats--agricultural and developed lands. The book considers extirpated and endangered species alongside invasives and exotics, and evaluates floral and faunal distribution at century intervals to chart ecological change.

Today I Am a Woman

by Shulamit Reinharz Barbara Vinick

Recollections of the first bat mitzvah at the only synagogue in Indonesia, a poignant bat mitzvah memory of World War II Italy, and an American bat mitzvah shared with girls in a Ukrainian orphanage--these are a few of the resonant testimonies about the transition from Jewish girl to Jewish woman collected in Today I Am a Woman. Introduced by brief biographical notes and descriptions of Jewish communities around the world, these stories reveal how Judaism defines this important rite of passage in a girl's life in widely disparate settings. The contributions are from bat mitzvah girls of the past and present, their parents, communities, and religious leaders. Including evocative family photos--some recent, some from decades past--this rich compilation is an ideal gift for bat mitzvah celebrants, their families, and friends.

Early Twentieth-Century Continental Philosophy

by Leonard Lawlor

Early Twentieth-Century Continental Philosophy elaborates the basic project of contemporary continental philosophy, which culminates in a movement toward the outside. Leonard Lawlor interprets key texts by major figures in the continental tradition, including Bergson, Foucault, Freud, Heidegger, Husserl, and Merleau-Ponty, to develop the broad sweep of the aims of continental philosophy. Lawlor discusses major theoretical trends in the work of these philosophers--immanence, difference, multiplicity, and the overcoming of metaphysics. His conception of continental philosophy as a unified project enables Lawlor to think beyond its European origins and envision a global sphere of philosophical inquiry that will revitalize the field.

Playing on the Edge: Sadomasochism, Risk, and Intimacy

by Staci Newmahr

Representations of consensual sadomasochism range from the dark, seedy undergrounds of crime thrillers to the fetishized pornographic images of sitcoms and erotica. In this pathbreaking book, ethnographer Staci Newmahr delves into the social space of a public, pansexual SM community to understand sadomasochism from the inside out. Based on four years of in-depth and immersive participant observation, she juxtaposes her experiences in the field with the life stories of community members, providing a richly detailed portrait of SM as a social space in which experiences of "violence" intersect with experiences of the erotic. She shows that SM is a recreational and deeply gendered risk-taking endeavor, through which participants negotiate boundaries between chaos and order. Playing on the Edge challenges our assumptions about sadomasochism, sexuality, eroticism, and emotional experience, exploring what we mean by intimacy, and how, exactly, we achieve it.

Not One Drop

by Riki Ott

This DVD/book package should be read and viewed by everyone concerned with crimes against man and nature; about corporate lies and the value of community. Betrayed by oilmen's promises in the 1970s, the people of Prince William Sound, Alaska, awaken on March 14, 1989, to the nation's largest oil spill. Not One Dropis an extraordinary tale of ordinary lives ripped apart by disaster and of community healing through building relationships of trust. This story offers critical lessons for a society traumatized by political divides and facing the looming catastrophe of global climate change. Author Riki Ott, a rare combination of commercial salmon "fisherm'am" and PhD marine biologist, describes firsthand the impacts of oil companies' broken promises when the Exxon Valdez spills most of its cargo and despoils thousands of miles of shore. Ott illustrates in stirring fashion the oil industry's 20-year trail of pollution and deception that predated the tragic 1989 spill and delves deep into the disruption to the fishing community of Cordova over the following 19 years. In vivid detail, she describes the human trauma coupled inextricably with that of the sound's wildlife and its long road to recovery. Black Wave (DVD) -directed by Robert Cornellier, tells the story of the biggest environmental catastrophe in North American history. In a flash, dramatic images shoot across the planet. They show thousands of carcasses of seabirds and sea otters covered in oil. A thick black tide rises and covers the beaches of once-pristine Prince William Sound. For twenty years Riki Ott and the fishermen of the little town of Cordova, Alaska have waged the longest legal battle in U. S. history against the world's most powerful oil company - ExxonMobil. They tell us all about the environmental, social and economic consequences of the black wave that changed their lives forever. Not One DropandBlack Waveshow us how too many corporate owners and political leaders betray everyday citizens and how a community forges a new path from despair to hope.

Mortgage Free!

by Rob Roy

As a wave of foreclosures sweeps the country, many people are giving up hope for owning a home of their own. They have good reason to turn their backs on the banks, but not on their dreams. In this revised edition of Mortgage Free!, Rob Roy offers a series of escape routes from enslavement to financial institutions, underscored by true stories of intrepid homeowners who have put their principles into action. From back-to-the-land homesteads to country homes, here is a complete guide to strategies that allow you to own your land and home, free and clear, without the bank. Included is detailed advice about:*Clarifying and simplifying your notions of what's necessary;*Finding land that you love and can afford;*Taking control of the house-building process, for the sake of sanity and pleasure; and*Learning to take a long-term perspective on your family's crucial economic decisions, avoiding debt and modern-day serfdom.

Sippewissett

by Tim Traver

A biography of the famous New England salt marsh, interweaving science, history, and memoir. Tim Traver's "Sippewissett" is heir to a rich history of nature writing. Akin to classics like Aldo Leopold's "A Sand County Almanac" and Annie Dillard's "Pilgrim at Tinker Creek," the book forms an eloquent bridge between ecology and memory, science and art. Traver alternates between remembrances of the Cape Cod salt marsh where he spent his boyhood summers and the history of Sippewissett, a place that has been studied by many of America's great biologists, from Louis Agassiz to Rachel Carson. There is poetry in his retelling of the past, a childhood of mud and tides and water; there is great love in the peace and satisfaction he finds later in life fishing and clamming and watching his own children discover the secrets of the marsh. Traver manages to weave these personal details into mesmerizing historical passages and meditations on the ecology of place that read like whodunits; one discovery leads to another, from the most beautiful dance of life to more somber considerations, such as the way the marsh can tell us so much about our environmental crises. "Sippewissett" is an intimate exploration of place by a man of science and strong family bonds. Here is one of ecology's most studied places through the eyes of someone determined to make sense of its beauty and complexity filled with poetry yet grounded in science, a place disappearing in the face of development and global climate change.

Holy Roller

by Diane Wilson

In this rollicking memoir, Diane Wilson, a Texas Gulf Coast shrimper and the author of the highly acclaimed "An Unreasonable Woman" takes readers back to her childhood in rural Texas and into her family of Holy Rollers. By night at tent revivals, Wilson gets religion from Brother Dynamite, an ex-con who finds Jesus in a baloney sandwich and handles masses of squirming poisonous snakes under the protection of the Holy Ghost. By day, Wilson scratches secret messages to Jesus into the paint on her windowsill and lies down in the middle of the road to see how long she can sleep in between passing trucks. "Holy Roller" is a fast-paced, hilarious, sometimes shocking experience readers wonat soon forget. It is the prequel to Wilson's first book, telling the story of the Texas childhood of a fierce little girl who will grow up to become "An Unreasonable Woman," take on Big Industry, and win. One of the best Southern writers of her generation, Wilson's voice twangs with a style and accent all its own, as true and individual as her boundless originality and wild youth.

When Technology Fails

by Matthew Stein

There's never been a better time to "be prepared. " Matthew Stein's comprehensive primer on sustainable living skills-from food and water to shelter and energy to first-aid and crisis-management skills-prepares you to embark on the path toward sustainability. But unlike any other book, Stein not only shows you how to live "green" in seemingly stable times, but to live in the face of potential disasters, lasting days or years, coming in the form of social upheaval, economic meltdown, or environmental catastrophe. "When Technology Fails" covers the gamut. You'll learn how to start a fire and keep warm if you've been left temporarily homeless, as well as the basics of installing a renewable energy system for your home or business. You'll learn how to find and sterilize water in the face of utility failure, as well as practical information for dealing with water-quality issues even when the public tap water is still flowing. You'll learn alternative techniques for healing equally suited to an era of profit-driven malpractice as to situations of social calamity. Each chapter (a survey of the risks to the status quo; supplies and preparation for short- and long-term emergencies; emergency measures for survival; water; food; shelter; clothing; first aid, low-tech medicine, and healing; energy, heat, and power; metalworking; utensils and storage; low-tech chemistry; and engineering, machines, and materials) offers the same approach, describing skills for self-reliance in good times and bad. Fully revised and expanded-the first edition was written pre-9/11 and pre-Katrina, when few Americans took the risk of social disruption seriously-"When Technology Fails" ends on a positive, proactive note with a new chapter on "Making the Shift to Sustainability," which offers practical suggestions for changing our world on personal, community and global levels.

Finding the Sweet Spot: The Natural Entrepreneur's Guide to Responsible, Sustainable, Joyful Work

by Dave Pollard

""Now what am I going to do?" is a question many people ask-and leave unanswered-at critical potential turning points in their careers. Perhaps you're a new graduate, but instead of lining up for a boring entry-level job at a big corporation, you wish you could start your own sustainable and responsible business. Or maybe you've been stuck in a job you hate for a few years, but you still dream of doing the thing you love and that you're actually good at. Or maybe you're a boomer and you're ready for a second career, a personal venture that will represent a total change from what you've spent most of your work life doing. Whatever your situation, this is the book to help you get started. Finding the Sweet Spot explains how sustainable, responsible, and joyful natural enterprises differ from most jobs, and it provides the framework for building your own natural enterprise. You'll learn how to find partners who will help make your venture successful, how to do world-class market research, how to innovate, how to build resilience into your enterprise, and how to avoid the land mines that sink so many small businesses. Most importantly, you'll learn how to find the "sweet spot" where your gifts, your passions, and your purpose intersect. And make no mistake: our world needs your talent. The current economic system and the educational system that feeds into it have let us down and are destroying our planet. We need a blossoming of natural enterprises-connected, collaborating, and supporting ventures-to form a dynamic new natural economy. Is such a thing possible? Inventor, entrepreneur, and humanist Buckminster Fuller said: "You never change things by fighting the existing reality. To change something, build a new model that makes the existing model obsolete. " Finding the Sweet Spot presents a new model. Use it to find the work you were meant to do, thereby helping to create the world we're meant to live-and make a living-in. "

Gaviotas

by Alan Weisman

In the late 1960s, a young Colombian named Paolo Lugari developed what would become one of the world's most celebrated examples of sustainable living. Featuring a new Afterword by the author, this anniversary edition describes how Gaviotas has progressed over the past decade.

Showing 41,501 through 41,525 of 73,034 results

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