Browse Results What Format Should I Choose?

Showing 49,076 through 49,100 of 111,641 results

The Young Healer

by Frank N. Mcmillan III

In THE YOUNG HEALER tradition meets contemporary when what starts out as just another day becomes anything but that for young Feather Anderson. Her beloved grandfather, a traditional Lakota healer, pulls her out of class one snowy morning and takes her on an old-fashioned vision quest in the heart of New York City in hopes of finding the perfect Lakota medicine. It becomes the most magical day ever for eleven-year-old Feather Anderson, the day she saves her little brother's life. Feather follows in her grandfather's footsteps of healing as a medicine man and she then earns her newly-given secret Lakota name.

Bizarre Politics: The Audacity, Stupidity, Incompetence, And General Idiocy Of Our Leaders ... Unfortunately!

by Joe Rhatigan

Pizza kings, mama bears, fake PAC ads, and obscene tweets: Today's politics seem to have grown crazier--and more contentious--than ever. But is it really any weirder now than it ever was? In a world filled with corruption, lies, and illicit affairs, where the news regularly serves up politicians' gaffes, crimes, and screwups, it's hard to imagine things were ever stranger. Well, guess what? America has a long history of bizarre politics. . . and it's all here We invite you into the political loony bin, where you'll encounter dozens of really unlikely candidates, follow campaign trail madness, meet far too many contenders with foot-in-mouth disease, and learn about a host of false promises and lies meant to lure (presumably gullible) voters.

SNOWMOBILE: Bombardier's Dream Machine

by Jules Older

In 1922, when Joseph-Armand Bombardier was fifteen years old he built his first snow vehicle. He had always loved to tinker with motors and make things go, and he dreamed of building a vehicle that could go over snow. His first attempt, using a Model T Ford engine and a wooden propeller, worked well. To Joseph-Armand's mind, anyhow. Not so much his father, who made him take the contraption apart. Over the years, Joseph-Armand dreamed of becoming a great mechanic and inventing machines. But when his young son died of a fever because it was impossible to get to the hospital over the snow-covered roads, Joseph-Armand applied his single-minded determination to building a vehicle that could go over snow. It took years, but he accomplished his goal. His invention changed the way people in snow country lived. Inaccessible roads could now be travelled, taking patients to hospitals, doctors and priests to the needy, children to school, and even mail to residents.

Higgins Hole

by Kevin Boreen

"Jumping conch shells! Have I got a tale for you!" So begins the account of the battle for Higgins Hole by its most noble historian and poet laureate, Petronius the seahorse. Tucked away from the powerful currents of the ocean, Higgins Hole is home to a peaceful community of quirky sea creatures--until a vicious pack of great white sharks, led by the ferocious Tacitus, invades. Lutus, the Hole's sage lobster leader, and Apollo, the sea turtle diplomat, appeal to the Oceanic Council for help, while General Integritus, the courageous military commander, does his best to protect the Hole. Yet in the end, it will be up to the Hole's inhabitants to rid their waters of the intruders, with the aid of the legendary Flying Dolphin Squadron and a helping hand from the mysterious depths of the abyss.

The Human Genome: The Book of Essential Knowledge

by John Quackenbush

The DNA sequence that comprises the human genome--the genetic blueprint found in each of our cells--is undoubtedly the greatest code ever to be broken. Completed at the dawn of a new millennium, the feat electrified both the scientific community and the general public with its tantalizing promise of new and better treatments for countless diseases, including Alzheimer's, cancer, diabetes, and Parkinson's. Yet what is arguably the most important discovery of our time has also opened a Pandora's box of questions about who we are as humans and how the unique information stored in our genomes can and might be used, making it all the more important for everyone to understand the new science of genomics. In the CURIOSITY GUIDE TO THE HUMAN GENOME, Dr. John Quackenbush, a renowned scientist and professor, conducts a fascinating tour of the history and science behind the Human Genome Project and the technologies that are revolutionizing the practice of medicine today. With a clear and engaging narrative style, he demystifies the fundamental principles of genetics and molecular biology, including the astounding ways in which genes function, alone or together with other genes and the environment, to either sustain life or trigger disease. In addition, Dr. Quackenbush goes beyond medicine to examine how DNA-sequencing technology is changing how we think of ourselves as a species by providing new insights about our earliest ancestors and reconfirming our inextricable link to all life on earth. Finally, he explores the legal and ethical questions surrounding such controversial topics as stem cell research, prenatal testing, forensics, and cloning, making this volume of the Curiosity Guides series an indispensable resource for navigating our brave new genomic world.

Curiosity Guides: Global Climate Change

by Ernest Zebrowski

"Climate change? Global warming?"... We've probably all heard these words over and over again, from media reporters, from elected officials, and even from friends and co-workers. Scientists argue about what they mean for our future.What is the truth? How can we decipher exactly what really are the effects of environmental damage? Where can we go to get dependable, clearly-written information so we can join in the conversation and take the right action?THE CURIOSITY GUIDE TO GLOBAL WARMING fills that need, with a scientifically accurate introduction to perhaps the most important issue of our time. It unravels the mysteries of nature and settles any issue of "reasonable doubt" about the reality of global climate change.Dr. Ernest Zebrowski, a prominent scientist and educator examines everything from melting glaciers and disappearing snow covers to increased levels of carbon dioxide in our atmosphere; patterns of climate change through the centuries, and the potentially disastrous effects (including rising seas, more violent storms, and alterations in agricultural productivity) of environmental damage.If you need to understand what's in the news, in print and on line about this subject, this is the one book to read.

Bizarre History: Strange Happenings, Stupid Misconceptions, Distorted Facts and Uncommon Events

by Joe Rhatigan

This is history served up high-octane, with all of the fun and none of the boredom. It's not about memorizing lists of dates or names, or remembering which general won what battle. Instead, BIZARRE HISTORY merrily digs up the scandals, the strangeness, and the scintillating details that illuminate personalities, events, and real life. Think of it not as a textbook, but as history's juicy unauthorized biography--a historical document in which relevance never gets in the way of a good read. There are humorous quotes from famous figures such as Mark Twain and Napoleon ("History is a myth that men agree to believe"), as well as witty commentary about leaders of the past. After all, while you're probably familiar with William the Conquerer, have you heard of Charles the Simple, ruler of France and son of Louis the Stammerer? What about the emperor who entered Rome in a chariot drawn by 50 naked slaves--and invented the first whoopee cushion, too? But you can find lots of wildness closer to home: George Washington wrote love letters to a married woman; "Old Hickory" Andrew Jackson had been in at least seven duels before becoming president; and Benjamin Franklin fathered an illegitimate child. Paranoia also plagued a few of our presidents: the only thing Franklin Roosevelt had to fear was the number 13: he wouldn't invite 13 guests to a dinner party or travel on the 13th. And both Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan had encounters with UFOs The fun facts span the globe, covering the crazy acts of Caligula in the Roman Empire; the "Dog Shogun" in 17th century Japan; the "Pork and Beans" war between the US and Canada; and even details about fashion, medicine, sports, and the real Dracula. It's a wild journey that no one could resist

Book of Superstitious Stuff

by Joanne O'Sullivan

From the curse of the lottery winners to the good feng shui of a local restaurant, this quirky, wacky, weird, and wonderful collection of superstitions uncovers the truth about some of our most familiar beliefs, as well as others that are much stranger. It turns out that everywhere in the world, people still put their trust in luck, magic, and mystery. By the end of this look at the bizarre world of illogic it's clear: superstition is alive and well...and really spellbinding!

Book of Science Stuff

by Joe Rhatigan

Rather than paying tribute to the great discoveries and discoverers, the BOOK OF SCIENCE STUFF takes a fun look at the silly, hilarious, horrible underbelly of science. In a series of enjoyable short accounts, it focuses on the failures, reveals the petty squabbles, and introduces the "nerds" who labored in labs around the world. Check out the blunders--like scary Cold War experiments, idiotic research grants, and space study stupidity; meet the "Sigmund Frauds" and the real Frankensteins; and peek into the secret lives of scientists (if you dare). See how science makes the world go round--and directly affects everyone's daily lives. Scrutinize Hollywood's presentation of science on film and TV. And ponder the ways science sometimes pulls the wool over our eyes.

Book of Baseball Stuff

by Ron Martirano

This book hits a grand slam right out of the park! No diehard devotee of the diamond will be able to resist this completely out-of-the ordinary look at the sport. It's rich in anecdotes about team superstitions (from the black cat that haunted the Cubs to the "Curse of the Bambino"), the antics of the superstars, and other stuff that comes out of left field. Think today's umpires have a temper? Wait till you read about the 19th century New Jersey ump who pulled out a gun and shoved it in the face of a player who came at him with a bat. Or about the time three Brooklyn Dodger runners found themselves at third base...together.

Rickshaw Girl

by Mitali Perkins

In her Bangladesh village, ten-year-old Naimi excels at painting designs called alpanas, but to help her impoverished family financially she would have to be a boy--or disguise herself as one.

Kyle's Island

by Sally Derby

Kyle is willing to do anything just to earn money to help with cabin payments so his family doesn't have to give it up. This summer may be the last at the lake, and Kyle struggles to understand the changes in the people in his life.

The Importance of Wings

by Robin Friedman

With their mother caring for relatives in Israel and their father driving a cab all hours, Roxanne and her sister spend a lot of time watching TV reruns. When Liat, a fellow Israeli, moves into the "cursed house" next door, things begin to change, and Roxanne realizes that maybe real life is better than TV life.

The Golden Dreydl

by Ellen Kushner

Sara finds Chanukah celebrations boring. When her Tante Miriam arrives and gives her a Golden Dreydl, everything changes. The dreydl, an enchanted princess in disguise, takes Sara on a journey to a magical world. When the princess is taken by the Demon King, who possesses the power of the Tree of Life, it is Sara who must use her wit to save the princess and return her to her parents - King Solomon and the Queen of Sheba. A delightful holiday tale that weaves together threads of Jewish folklore and tradition with fantasy and humor.

Family Reminders

by Julie Danneberg

In the late 1800's ten-year old Mary McHugh's world is shattered when her father is injured in a mining accident. Mary's love for her father and her desperation to get life back to "normal" push her to take a chance that restores her father's spirit and also provides income for the family so they don't have to move.

Bamboo People: A Novel

by Mitali Perkins

Narrated by two teenaged boys on opposing sides of the conflict between the Burmese government and the Karenni, one of Burma's many Ethnic minorities, this coming-of-age novel takes place against the political and military backdrop of modern-day Burma. Chiko isn't a fighter by nature. He's a book-loving Burmese boy whose father, a doctor, is in prison for resisting the government. Tu Reh, on the other hand, wants to fight for freedom after watching Burmese soldiers destroy his Karenni family's home and bamboo fields. Timidity becomes courage and anger becomes compassion when the boys' stories intersect.

Time Management

by Brian Tracy

More than any other practice in your career, your ability to manage time will determine your success or failure. It's a simple equation. The better you use your time, the more you will accomplish, and the greater your rewards will be. This pocket-sized guide reveals 21 proven time management techniques you can use immediately to gain two or more productive hours every day. Featuring the strategies that business expert Brian Tracy has identified as the most effective and that he himself employs, this handy volume reveals how you can: * Handle endless interruptions, meetings, emails, and phone calls * Identify your key result areas * Allocate enough time for top priority responsibilities * Batch similar tasks to preserve focus and make the most of each minute * Overcome procrastination * Determine what to delegate and what to eliminate * Utilize Program Evaluation and Review Techniques to work back ward from the future...and ensure your most important goals are met * And more Filled with Brian Tracy's trademark wisdom, this book will help you get more done, in less time...and with much less stress.

A White Wind Blew

by James Markert

"A compelling and thought-provoking novel that will move and inspire readers of all kinds." -John Burnham Schwartz, author of Reservation Road When the body fails, you've got two choices. Send a doctor in, or send a prayer up. And if neither works? You'll find Dr. Wolfgang Pike at his piano. Music has always been Wolfgang's refuge. It's betraying him now, as he struggles to compose a requiem for his late wife, but surely the right ending will come to him. Certainly it'll come more quickly than a cure for his patients up at Waverly Hills, the tuberculosis hospital, where nearly a body an hour leaves in a coffin. Wolfgang can't seem to save anyone these days, least of all himself. Sometimes we just need to know we're not the only ones in the fight. A former concert pianist checks in, triggering something deep inside Wolfgang, and spreading from patient to patient. Soon Wolfgang finds himself in the center of an orchestra that won't give up, with music that won't stop. A White Wind Blew delivers a sweeping crescendo of hope in a time of despair, raising compelling questions about faith and confession, music and medicine,and the undying force of love.

Silence of the Wolf

by Terry Spear

A hunky werewolf and a beautiful stranger collide in this hot new paranormal shape-shifting romance Gray werewolf Tom Silver is determined to find the wolves who have been attacking local livestock. While tracking the pack through the Rockies, a blizzard forces him into a remote cabin where he hears a plane crash nearby. When he discovers the sole survivor is a beautiful female werewolf/ coyote shifter mix, bound as a prisoner, he knows it's his duty to hide her. Now, they are both at risk as a search ensues for the missing prisoner. Will Tom be able to protect this beautiful stranger while tracking down the wolves responsible for terrorizing the local livestock?

The Limits of Partnership

by Angela Stent

The Limits of Partnership offers a riveting narrative on U.S.-Russian relations since the Soviet collapse and on the challenges ahead. It reflects the unique perspective of an insider who is also recognized as a leading expert on this troubled relationship. American presidents have repeatedly attempted to forge a strong and productive partnership only to be held hostage to the deep mistrust born of the Cold War. For the United States, Russia remains a priority because of its nuclear weapons arsenal, its strategic location bordering Europe and Asia, and its ability to support--or thwart--American interests. Why has it been so difficult to move the relationship forward? What are the prospects for doing so in the future? Is the effort doomed to fail again and again? Angela Stent served as an adviser on Russia under Bill Clinton and George W. Bush, and maintains close ties with key policymakers in both countries. Here, she argues that the same contentious issues--terrorism, missile defense, Iran, nuclear proliferation, Afghanistan, the former Soviet space, the greater Middle East--have been in every president's inbox, Democrat and Republican alike, since the collapse of the USSR. Stent vividly describes how Clinton and Bush sought inroads with Russia and staked much on their personal ties to Boris Yeltsin and Vladimir Putin--only to leave office with relations at a low point--and how Barack Obama managed to restore ties only to see them undermined by a Putin regime resentful of American dominance and determined to restore Russia's great power status. The Limits of Partnership calls for a fundamental reassessment of the principles and practices that drive U.S.-Russian relations, and offers a path forward to meet the urgent challenges facing both countries.

Lending to the Borrower from Hell

by Mauricio Drelichman Hans-Joachim Voth

Why do lenders time and again loan money to sovereign borrowers who promptly go bankrupt? When can this type of lending work? As the United States and many European nations struggle with mountains of debt, historical precedents can offer valuable insights. Lending to the Borrower from Hell looks at one famous case--the debts and defaults of Philip II of Spain. Ruling over one of the largest and most powerful empires in history, King Philip defaulted four times. Yet he never lost access to capital markets and could borrow again within a year or two of each default. Exploring the shrewd reasoning of the lenders who continued to offer money, Mauricio Drelichman and Hans-Joachim Voth analyze the lessons from this important historical example. Using detailed new evidence collected from sixteenth-century archives, Drelichman and Voth examine the incentives and returns of lenders. They provide powerful evidence that in the right situations, lenders not only survive despite defaults--they thrive. Drelichman and Voth also demonstrate that debt markets cope well, despite massive fluctuations in expenditure and revenue, when lending functions like insurance. The authors unearth unique sixteenth-century loan contracts that offered highly effective risk sharing between the king and his lenders, with payment obligations reduced in bad times. A fascinating story of finance and empire, Lending to the Borrower from Hell offers an intelligent model for keeping economies safe in times of sovereign debt crises and defaults.

Racisms

by Francisco Bethencourt

Groundbeaking in its global and historical scope, Racisms is the first comprehensive history of racism, from the Crusades to the twentieth century. Demonstrating that there is not one continuous tradition of racism in the West, distinguished historian Francisco Bethencourt shows that racism preceded any theories of race and must be viewed within the prism and context of social hierarchies and local conditions. In this richly illustrated book, Bethencourt argues that in its various aspects, all racism has been triggered by political projects monopolizing specific economic and social resources. Bethencourt focuses on the Western world, but opens comparative views on ethnic discrimination and segregation in Asia and Africa. He looks at different forms of racism, particularly against New Christians and Moriscos in Iberia, black slaves and freedmen in colonial and postcolonial environments, Native Americans, Armenians in the Ottoman Empire, and Jews in modern Europe. Exploring instances of enslavement, forced migration, and ethnic cleansing, Bethencourt reflects on genocide and the persecution of ethnicities in twentieth-century Europe and Anatolia. These cases are compared to the genocide of the Herero and Tutsi in Africa, and ethnic discrimination in Japan, China, and India. Bethencourt analyzes how practices of discrimination and segregation from the sixteenth to the nineteenth centuries were defended, and he systematically integrates visual culture into his investigation. Moving away from ideas of linear or innate racism, this is a major interdisciplinary work that recasts our understanding of interethnic relations.

Essays and Reviews

by Michael Wood Bernard Williams

Bernard Williams was one of the most important philosophers of the last fifty years, but he was also a distinguished critic and essayist with an elegant style and a rare ability to communicate complex ideas to a wide public. This is the first collection of Williams's popular essays and reviews, many of which appeared in the New York Review of Books, the London Review of Books, and the Times Literary Supplement. In these pieces, Williams writes about a broad range of subjects, from philosophy and political philosophy to religion, science, the humanities, economics, socialism, feminism, and pornography. Included here are reviews of major books such as John Rawls's Theory of Justice, Robert Nozick's Anarchy, State, and Utopia, Alastair MacIntyre's After Virtue, Richard Rorty's Consequences of Pragmatism, and Martha Nussbaum's Therapy of Desire. But many of these essays extend beyond philosophy and together provide an intellectual tour through the past half century, from C. S. Lewis and Umberto Eco to Noam Chomsky. No matter the subject, Williams probes and challenges arguments, teases out their implications, and connects them to the wider intellectual scene. At the same time, readers see a first-class mind grappling with landmark books in "real time," before critical consensus had formed and ossified. In his foreword, Michael Wood discusses Williams's style and sensibility and his concern that philosophy contribute to the larger intellectual conversation.

Beautiful Geometry

by Eli Maor Eugen Jost

If you've ever thought that mathematics and art don't mix, this stunning visual history of geometry will change your mind. As much a work of art as a book about mathematics, Beautiful Geometry presents more than sixty exquisite color plates illustrating a wide range of geometric patterns and theorems, accompanied by brief accounts of the fascinating history and people behind each. With artwork by Swiss artist Eugen Jost and text by acclaimed math historian Eli Maor, this unique celebration of geometry covers numerous subjects, from straightedge-and-compass constructions to intriguing configurations involving infinity. The result is a delightful and informative illustrated tour through the 2,500-year-old history of one of the most important and beautiful branches of mathematics.

Rick Steves' Snapshot Basque Country: Spain and France

by Rick Steves

Rick Steves covers the essentials of the Basque Country, including the Bay of Biscay, Guernica, and Bayonne. Visit the Spanish Basque Country's Old Town, where San Sebastián originated 1,000 years ago, or take in French Basque Country's royally historical landmark, Eglise St. Jean-Baptiste. You'll get Rick's firsthand advice on the best sights, eating, sleeping, and nightlife, and the maps and self-guided tours will ensure you make the most of your experience. More than just reviews and directions, a Rick Steves Snapshot guide is a tour guide in your pocket. Rick Steves' Snapshot guides consist of excerpted chapters from Rick Steves' European country guidebooks. Snapshot guides are a great choice for travelers visiting a specific city or region, rather than multiple European destinations. These slim guides offer all of Rick's up-to-date advice on what sights are worth your time and money. They include good-value hotel and restaurant recommendations, with no introductory information (such as overall trip planning, when to go, and travel practicalities).

Showing 49,076 through 49,100 of 111,641 results

Help

Select your format based upon: 1) how you want to read your book, and 2) compatibility with your reading tool. To learn more about using Bookshare with your device, visit the "Using Bookshare" page in the Help Center.

Here is an overview of the specialized formats that Bookshare offers its members with links that go to the Help Center for more information.

  • Bookshare Web Reader - a customized reading tool for Bookshare members offering all the features of DAISY with a single click of the "Read Now" link.
  • DAISY (Digital Accessible Information System) - a digital book file format. DAISY books from Bookshare are DAISY 3.0 text files that work with just about every type of access technology that reads text. Books that contain images will have the download option of ‘DAISY Text with Images’.
  • BRF (Braille Refreshable Format) - digital Braille for use with refreshable Braille devices and Braille embossers.
  • MP3 (Mpeg audio layer 3) - Provides audio only with no text. These books are created with a text-to-speech engine and spoken by Kendra, a high quality synthetic voice from Ivona. Any device that supports MP3 playback is compatible.
  • DAISY Audio - Similar to the Daisy 3.0 option above; however, this option uses MP3 files created with our text-to-speech engine that utilizes Ivona's Kendra voice. This format will work with Daisy Audio compatible players such as Victor Reader Stream and Read2Go.