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Too Close for Comfort?

by Linda Perlman Gordon Susan Morris Shaffer

A fascinating look at how mothers and their adult daughters have formed a greater friendship than generations past?and whether or not their should be boundaries. No relationship is more complicated than the one between mothers and daughters? especially today, when a cultural shift can cause a longer period of time of overlapping interests before the traditional adult markers of marriage and family. As a result, these young women are developing deeper bonds with their own mothers, a relationship that sometimes mimics friendship. But are these close bonds healthy? Is it time to cut the umbilical cord? In this eye-opening book, Linda Perlman Gordon and Susan Morris Shaffer explore the modern mother-daughter relationship in all its glorious complexity. Combining a brilliant sociological analysis with fascinating stories of real- life women, Too Close for Comfort? provides a rich, provocative look at the ways mothers and daughters get it right, how they get it wrong?and how they can happily maintain being friends as well as mothers and daughters.

The Tale of Applebeck Orchard

by Susan Wittig Albert

After his haystack was torched, Mr. Harmsworth barricaded a common path through his orchard. But witnesses-both human and animal-claim a ghost perpetrated the deed. And the ghost has a message that Miss Potter hopes to figure out.

Dark Road Rising

by P. N. Elrod

View our feature on P.N. Elrod's Dark Road Rising. The first new Vampire Files novel in four years! Vampire P.I. Jack Fleming is playing babysitter to Gabriel "Whitey" Kroun, a dangerously unstable mobster--and newly-created vampire--with deadly secrets to hide. As Jack tries to unravel the mystery surrounding Kroun's undead state, he gets caught between his charge's violent outbursts and some syndicate torpedoes looking to rub them both out, leaving him vulnerable to an even deadlier threat-- the return of an old enemy desperate to unlock the secrets of Jack's vampire immortality.

Lighting Their Fires

by Rafe Esquith

Lighting Their Fires

Ophelia Joined the Group Maidens Who Don't Float

by Sarah Schmelling

Read Sarah Schmelling's posts on the Penguin Blog. When humorist Sarah Schmelling transformed Hamlet into a Facebook news feed on McSweeney's, it launched the next big humor trend--Facebook lit. In this world, the king "pokes" the queen, Hamlet becomes a fan of daggers, and Ophelia renounces her interest in moody princes. Now, what began as an internet phenomenon is a book. Ophelia Joined The Group Maidens Who Don't Float: Classic Lit Signs on to Facebook is a clever spoof of the most-trafficked social networking website and a playful game of literary who's who. The book brings more than fifty authors and stories from classic literature back to life and online, and it is sure to have book lovers and Facebook addicts alike twittering with joy. From The Odyssey to The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Pride and Prejudice to Lolita, Schmelling brings the conventions of social networking--profile pages, status updates, news feeds, games and quizzes--to some of literature's most well-known works, authors and characters. What would Edgar Allan Poe, Jane Austen or James Joyce post on their "walls"? What would Gulliver, Miss Havisham or Captain Ahab say in a status update? After William Shakespeare welcomes all of these players into his network, mayhem quickly ensues: Elizabeth Bennet throws a sheep at Mr. Darcy Hamlet posts an event: A Play That's Totally Fictional and In No Way About My Family Jane Eyre listens to "Hard Knock Life" on repeat The Lord of the Flies boys form a reunion group Ernest Hemingway questions the validity of the "Are you a real man?" quiz Mark Twain infiltrates Oscar Wilde's profile page and challenges him to a "quip off" Oedipus works on his family tree Following everyone from Frankenstein's Monster to King Lear's Fool, Charles Dickens to Virginia Woolf, Ophelia Joined The Group Maidens Who Don't Float is a loving spoof of our literary favorites, and a hilarious collection for a twenty-first century generation of readers. Long live the Classics: 2. 0! .

Ice Land

by Betsy Tobin

A beautiful epic of love, longing, redemption, and enchantment in the tradition of Marion Zimmer Bradley?s The Mists of Avalon Iceland, AD 1000 Freya knows that her people are doomed. Warned by the Fates of an impending disaster, she must embark on a journey to find a magnificent gold necklace, one said to possess the power to alter the course of history. But even as Freya travels deep into the mountains of Iceland, the country is on the brink of war. The new world order of Christianity is threatening the old ways of Iceland?s people, and tangled amidst it all are two star-crossed lovers who destiny draws them together?even as their families are determined to tear them apart Infused with the rich history and mythology of Iceland, Betsy Tobin?s sweeping novel is an epic adventure of forbidden love, lust, jealousy, faith and magical wonder set under the shadow of a smoldering volcano. .

The Curse of the Good Girl

by Rachel Simmons

Bestselling author of Odd Girl Out, Rachel Simmons exposes the myth of the Good Girl, freeing girls from its impossible standards and encouraging them to embrace their real selves In The Curse of the Good Girl, bestselling author Rachel Simmons argues that in lionizing the Good Girl we are teaching girls to embrace a version of selfhood that sharply curtails their power and potential. Unerringly nice, polite, modest, and selfless, the Good Girl is a paradigm so narrowly defined that it's unachievable. When girls inevitably fail to live up- experiencing conflicts with peers, making mistakes in the classroom or on the playing field-they are paralyzed by self-criticism, stunting the growth of vital skills and habits. Simmons traces the poisonous impact of Good Girl pressure on development and provides a strategy to reverse the tide. At once expository and prescriptive, The Curse of the Good Girl is a call to arms from a new front in female empowerment. Looking to the stories shared by the women and girls who attend her workshops, Simmons shows that Good Girl pressure from parents, teachers, coaches, media, and peers erects a psychological glass ceiling that begins to enforce its confines in girlhood and extends across the female lifespan. The curse of the Good Girl erodes girls' ability to know, express, and manage a complete range of feelings. It expects girls to be selfless, limiting the expression of their needs. It requires modesty, depriving the permission to articulate their strengths and goals. It diminishes assertive body language, quieting voices and weakening handshakes. It touches all areas of girls' lives and follows many into adulthood, limiting their personal and professional potential. Since the popularization of the Ophelia phenomenon, we have lamented the loss of self-esteem in adolescent girls, recognizing that while the doors of opportunity are open to twenty-first-century American girls, many lack the confidence to walk through them. In The Curse of the Good Girl, Simmons provides a catalog of tangible lessons in bolstering the self and silencing the curse of the Good Girl. At the core of Simmons's radical argument is her belief that the most critical freedom we can win for our daughters is the liberty not only to listen to their inner voice but also to act on it. Watch a Video .

The Island at the End of the World

by Sam Taylor

Through the eyes of eight-year-old Finn we find ourselves on a small island, surrounded by nothing but sea. Finn lives here with his Pa, his elder sister Alice and his younger sister Daisy, and has no memory of any world but this one. All he knows of the past comes from the songs and stories of his father, which tell of the great flood that drowned all the other inhabitants of the earth, a deluge their family survived thanks to the ark in which they now live. Alice, however, has entered adolescence, and treasures vague memories of her dead mother and of life before the flood. As her relationship with her father changes, she begins to see holes in his account of the past, and desperately seeks contact with the outside world. And when a boy, a stranger, is washed up on the shore, apparently in answer to the message she sent in a bottle, it appears they may not be alone after all. Set in the near future, told from three different viewpoints and written in extraordinary prose, The Island at the End of the World is an original, moving exploration of family love, truth and lies, and how strange and frightening it can feel for a child to discover the adult world.

78 Reasons Why Your Book May Never Be Published and 14 Reasons Why It Just Might

by Pat Walsh

For the hundreds of thousands who buy writers' guides every year, at last there's one that tells the ugly truth: writers who can't get published are usually making a lot of mistakes. This honest, often funny, book shows them how to identify their own missteps, stop listening to bad advice, and get to work. Drawing on his experience as founding editor of MacAdam/Cage, Pat Walsh gives writers what they need--specific, straightforward feedback to help them overcome bad habits and bad luck. He avoids the optimistic, sometimes misleading directions often found in publishing how-to books and presents the industry as it is, warts and all. Here is the first guide that tells writers just what the odds against them are and gives them practical tips for evening them.

Stay Home, Stay Happy

by Rachel Campos-Duffy

A warm, inspiring, and practical handbook for at-home moms, by a television celebrity and mother of five. National television personality and mother of five Rachel Campos-Duffy presents a new way of looking at stay at-home motherhood that will transform the way readers view their days, their family, and their home. With practical advice and candid, engaging stories from her own life and other moms who are making it all work, mothers will learn about: ? Embracing the choice to stay home with joy and confidence ? Taking care of yourself, guilt-free ? How rekindling your relationship with your husband benefits the whole family ? Reveling in the chance to explore new passions and creative outlets ? And the 10 things that no mom can live without! .

'78: The Boston Red Sox, A Historic Game, and a Divided City

by Bill Reynolds

Now in paperback: the inside story behind a crucial chapter in Red Sox lore-and a turbulent time in a troubled city. George Steinbrenner called it the greatest game in the history of American sports. On a bright October day in 1978, the Boston Red Sox met the New York Yankees for an epic playoff game that would send one team to the World Series-and render the other cursed for almost a quarter of a century. Award-winning sports columnist Bill Reynolds masterfully tells the dramatic story of the rival teams and players at this pivotal moment, and explores the social issues that divided Boston that summer and their influence on one game beyond the realm of sports.

365 Science of Mind (pb reissue)

by Ernest Holmes

This newly repackaged edition of one of Tarcher's bestselling Holmes backlist titles contains wisdom designed to help each reader experience the Science of Mind philosophy day by day.

26 Fairmount Avenue

by Tomie Depaola

Tomie's family starts building their new house at 26 Fairmount Avenue in 1938, just as a hurricane hits town, starting off a busy, crazy year. Tomie has many adventures all his own, including eating chocolate with his Nana Upstairs, only to find out -- the hard way -- that they have eaten chocolate laxative. He tries to skip kindergarten when he finds out he won't learn to read until first grade. "I'll be back next year", he says. When Tomie goes to see Snow White, he creates another sensation. Tomie dePaola's childhood memories are hilarious, and his charming illustrations are sure to please.

2095 #5 (Time Warp Trio)

by Jon Scieszka

Everyone's favorite time-travelers are changing their styles! The Time Warp Trio series now features a brand-new, eye-catching design, sure to appeal to longtime fans, and those new to Jon Scieszka's wacky brand of humor.

100 Successful College Application Essays (Second Edition)

by Harvard Independent

The largest collection of successful college application essays available in one volume. These are the essays that helped their authors gain admission to Harvard, Yale, Brown, Columbia, Wellesley, Colby, and other outstanding schools--followed by invaluable comments by experts in admissions, placement, and college counseling at some of the best learning institutions around the country. This helpful guide includes: 100 complete essays with professional commentary Examples of essays on common topics (family background, athletics, work experience), as well as the more offbeat Essays on the immigrant experience by foreign-born students A section of drawing and cartoon essays Insider advice from a Princeton dean of admissions A "What Not to Do" chapter from a top college counselor And more Compiled by members from The Harvard Independent, the weekly newsmagazine of Harvard University, this is an invaluable resource for students who want to write the best possible essay--and improve their chances of admission to the best possible school.

The View From the Bridge

by Nicholas Meyer

The critically acclaimed director and writer shares his account of the making of the three classic Star Trek filmsThe View from the Bridge is Nicholas Meyer's enormously entertaining account of his involvement with the Star Trek films: STII: The Wrath of Khan, STIV: The Voyage Home, and STVI: The Undiscovered Country, as well as his illustrious career in the movie business. The man best known for bringing together Sherlock Holmes and Sigmund Freud in The Seven Per-Cent Solution had ironically never been interested in Star Trek until he was brought on board to save the film series. Meyer shares how he created the script for The Wrath of Khan, the most revered Star Trek film of all, in twelve days-only to have William Shatner proclaim he hated it. He reveals the death threats he received when word got out that Spock would be killed, and finally answers the long-pondered question of whether Khan's chiseled chest is truly that of Ricardo Montalban. Meyer's reminiscences on everyone from Gene Roddenberry to Laurence Olivier will appeal not only to the countless legions of Trekkies, but to anyone fascinated by the inner workings of Hollywood.

Born Round

by Frank Bruni

The New York Times restaurant critic's heartbreaking and hilarious account of how he learned to love food just enough after decades of struggling with his outsize appetite. Frank Bruni was born round. Round as in stout, chubby, and hungry, always and endlessly hungry. He grew up in a big, loud Italian family in White Plains, New York, where meals were epic, outsize affairs. At those meals, he demonstrated one of his foremost qualifications for his future career: an epic, outsize love of food. But Bruni's relationship with eating was tricky, and his difficulties with managing it began early. When Bruni was named the restaurant critic for The New York Times in 2004, he knew enough to be nervous. The restaurant critic at the Times performs one of the most closely watched tasks in the epicurean universe; a bumpy ride was certain, especially for someone who had never written about food, someone who for years had been busy writing about politics, presidential campaigns, and the pope. What qualified him to be one of the most loved and hated tastemakers in the New York food world? Did his decades-long obsession with food suffice? Food was his friend and enemy both, something he craved but feared, and his new-job jitters focused primarily on whether he'd finally made some sense of that relationship. In this coveted job, he'd face down his enemy at meal after indulgent meal. As his grandmother often put it, "Born round, you don't die square. " Would he fall back into his old habits or could he establish a truce with the food on his plate? Born Round traces the highly unusual path Bruni traveled to become a restaurant critic; it is the captivating account of an unpredictable journalistic ride from an intern's desk at Newsweek to a dream job at The New York Times, as well as the brutally honest story of Bruni's lifelong, often painful, struggle with food. Born Round will speak to any hungry hedonist who has ever had to rein in an appetite to avoid letting out a waistband and will delight anyone interested in matters of family, matters of the heart, and the big role food plays in them.

Never Make the First Offer

by Donald Dell

Donald Dell is a legend in the sports agent business. He's been at it for almost forty years, with a record of successful deals that puts him in a league of his own. His unique guide to negotiating includes examples from Dell's dealings with some of the biggest names in sports, stars like Michael Jordon, Jimmy Connors, Andy Roddick, and Patrick Ewing. The audiobook brings the inner workings of the negotiating room to life, from the intense all-night wrangling sessions to the devious battles of wits. There's plenty of backstabbing, but also moments of glory earned by a brilliant negotiator at the top of his game. Dell covers the various aspects of negotiations, in sports and in a more general context, such as understanding what's important, playing to your audience, gaining leverage and getting agreement. This includes such "life skills" as gaining trust, building relationships, and getting in touch with your "inner competitor. " They also provide in-depth prescriptive instruction in sports agentry, explaining such specifics as the standard player agreement, licensing agreements, and stadium naming rights contracts. Dell also shares his eight (sort of) absolute laws of negotiating, including: * Never make the first offer: The more information you can get from the other side before you name a number, the better your position. * Always be prepared to walk away: that gives you leverage. Conversely, if the other party senses you're negotiating from fear, you are immediately at a big disadvantage. * In every negotiation there is a moment of truth: The key is to position your offer so that when it gets to that point, it's hard for them to say no.

Intervention

by Robin Cook

Bestselling author Robin Cook returns with another ripped-from-the- headlines thriller, as New York City medical detective Jack Stapleton investigates the promises-and deadly risks-of alternative medicine and is led deep into the heart of a religious conspiracy...

How Did That Happen?

by Roger Connors

A simple, proven approach to improve accountability and your company's bottom line. The economy crashes, the government misfires, businesses fail, leaders don't lead, managers don't manage, and the people we count on for the results that affect our own performance don't follow through, leaving us asking, "How did that happen?" All the surprises caused by a lack of personal accountability plague almost every organization today, from the political arena to every large and small business. How Did That Happen? offers a proven way to eliminate these nasty surprises, gain an unbeatable competitive edge, and enhance performance by holding others accountable the positive, principled way. As the experts on workplace accountability and authors of The Oz Principle, the classic book on personal accountability, Roger Connors and Tom Smith now tackle the next crucial step everyone can take, whether as a manager, supervisor, CEO, or individual performer: creating greater accountability in all the people on whom you depend. Connors and Smith have spent decades implementing their approach to creating greater accountability in some of the world's most admired companies. Through hundreds of successful client applications, they have proven that organizational accountability can be the single most important factor in ensuring a company's success. Now, they present the Accountability Sequence, a systematic and sensible approach that includes two essential components: The Outer Ring, which reveals how to establish expectations and positive accountability connections with everyone in the Expectations Chain. The Inner Ring, which shows how to manage unmet expectations when people fail to deliver and thereby reverse the misfortune of missed results. Using case studies, practical models, and self-assessments, the authors make it possible for anyone to install accountability as a central part of their daily work, their team's efforts, or an overall corporate culture-and, in turn, increase profits and generate better results. .

The Amateurs

by Marcus Sakey

New from the "reigning prince of crime fiction"*: For four friends, there's only one thing more dangerous than the men chasing them. Each other. In just three novels, Marcus Sakey has staked a claim as "an astoundingly good writer,"* one whose believable characters-always ordinary people-face excruciating situations with life- or-death consequences. The Amateursasks a chilling question: Do you get what you deserve, or what you take? Alex is failing as a father. Ian keeps dangerous secrets. Jenn is pining for adventure; Mitch is pining for Jenn. Four friends just getting by. Every Thursday night they've found solace in a couple of beers and a couple of laughs. But months turn to years, and suddenly a decade is gone. None of them are where-or who-they hoped to be. And they've decided to do something about it. To stop waiting, and start taking. But what was supposed to be a victimless crime has become a bloody nightmare. People have been killed. A child is in danger. Ruthless men pursue them with relentless fury. And tensions they thought were long-buried threaten to destroy them. As their whole world begins to unravel, each will have to choose between their own life and the lives of others-including their best friends.

A Taste of Heaven

by Madeline Scherb

A fascinating (and mouthwatering!) look at the wonderful food and drink produced by monks and nuns in America, Belgium, France, and Germany. Part travel guide, part cookbook, A Taste of Heaven is a delightful survey of the fine food and drink made by Catholic religious orders in America, Belgium, France, and Germany. From positively scrumptious beer and cheese to some of the richest chocolate on earth, the treats presented in this book are heavenly indeed, and author Madeline Scherb beautifully captures the heart and spirit of the holy work that goes into producing them. With vivid descriptions of the monasteries, their fascinating histories, and helpful advice for travelers on getting there and getting the most out of their visit, this book will serve as an invaluable guide. A Taste of Heaven also contains more than thirty recipes from notable chefs that incorporate the products found at these monasteries, as well as a helpful guide to buying and ordering these delectable ingredients if you are unable to travel to the monasteries themselves. Recipes include such delights as: * Flamiche (a Belgian version of quiche that uses Postel cheese from the Postel Abbey in Belgium) from chef and food columnist Sandy D'Amato * Brownies à la Mode with Trappistine Caramel Sauce (uses caramel from Our Lady of the Mississippi Abbey, Iowa) * Blackberry Cabernet Sorbet (made with Pinot Noir from St. Hildegard Abbey near Rudesheim, Germany) from Ciao Bella Gelateria in Grand Central Terminal, New York City Featuring lovely original black-and-white illustrations that perfectly capture the tranquil atmosphere of the monasteries, A Taste of Heaven is a treasure for anyone who loves spirited food, drink, and travel. .

It Feels So Good When I Stop

by Joe Pernice

The hilarious and irreverent debut novel about a modern Everyman struggling to learn how to love, choose, and commit on his own terms, from the highly acclaimed singer and songwriter. From the first moment he met Jocelyn, he knew he would marry her or destroy his life trying. He didn't count on being the lucky bastard that got to do both. It's October 1996 in Cape Cod. Our hero- a narrator so ordinary that he remains nameless -is a talented but floundering musician-turnedwaiter who has hightailed it out of a volatile day-old marriage in New York and further into his own ever-deepening mess. With no job, no apartment, no wife, and a six pack of beer, he's looking for a clean slate. For years he's been dodging life's extremes, stuck somewhere between responsibility and freedom, love and obsession, obligation and desire, apathy and success. Now he's seeking sanctuary at the home that his sister abandoned, along with her marriage, so that he can sort out something in his life-what, he's not quite sure. Looking for distraction from his memories of the hot-blooded Jocelyn, who is still refusing to return his calls, he agrees to look after his two-year-old nephew. Together, the unlikely pair catches the attention of Marie, a young woman in the neighborhood with a troubled past of her own. As they get to know each other, our hero ventures into unknown territory, where his affection for a damaged kindred spirit just might shock him awake and shake him to the core. By turns hilariously irreverent and unpredictably affecting, It Feels So Good When I Stopis a disarmingly fresh love story and coming-ofage novel that refracts with pristine clarity what it's like to grow up, and to fall and stay in love in the real world.

The Last Ember

by Daniel Levin

Jonathan Marcus was a promising young archaeologist studying at the American Academy in Rome when a terrible accident during an illegal excavation resulted in a friend's death and Jonathan's expulsion from the academy. Jonathan abandoned archaeology for the law, developing a reputation as a skilful advocate for some of the art world's less scrupulous antiquities dealers. When his firm sends Jonathan to Rome to discredit the testimony of a prominent UN antiquities official, he's stunned to discover that the expert is Dr Emili Travia, a friend and fellow student at the academy who was also at the excavation. This chance reunion prompts Jonathan, against his better judgment, to help Emili as she searches for the fabled Tabernacle Menorah, a priceless historical artefact seized by Roman invaders in the first century AD and brought to Rome where it disappeared. As they scour the ancient sites of Rome for hints to the menorah's whereabouts - deciphering clues to its location left by ancient spies and 18th century art restorers - it quickly becomes clear that they are not alone in their quest. What follows is a treasure hunt like no other, a race to find the menorah in order to control a historical perspective of who can define - and redefine - the past.

A Question of Freedom

by Dwayne Betts

A unique prison narrative that testifies to the power of books to transform a young man's life At the age of sixteen, R. Dwayne Betts-a good student from a lower- middle-class family-carjacked a man with a friend. He had never held a gun before, but within a matter of minutes he had committed six felonies. In Virginia, carjacking is a "certifiable" offense, meaning that Betts would be treated as an adult under state law. A bright young kid, he served his nine-year sentence as part of the adult population in some of the worst prisons in the state. A Question of Freedom chronicles Betts's years in prison, reflecting back on his crime and looking ahead to how his experiences and the books he discovered while incarcerated would define him. Utterly alone, Betts confronts profound questions about violence, freedom, crime, race, and the justice system. Confined by cinder-block walls and barbed wire, he discovers the power of language through books, poetry, and his own pen. Above all, A Question of Freedom is about a quest for identity-one that guarantees Betts's survival in a hostile environment and that incorporates an understanding of how his own past led to the moment of his crime.

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