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It's My Party Too

by Christine Todd Whitman

Leading Republican moderate Christine Todd Whitman emerges in this forceful book as a voice for her party's disenfranchised-those she calls "radical moderates"-and an ardent, thoughtful opponent of the GOP's kowtowing to far-right "social fundamentalists. " In addition to offering a behind-the-scenes look at her own experience as New Jersey governor, and as a Bush administration insider, she calls upon Republicans-indeed, all Americans-to oppose the far right's "bullying" and to reestablish the centrist dialogue that has all but vanished in recent years. Eloquent and controversial, this book is sparking debate across the political spectrum.

Soaring on your Strengths

by Robin Ryan

Robin Ryan's groundbreaking new book is designed to help readers take advantage of a paradigm shift in the workplace. Instead of hiring or promoting generally qualified people and improving their weaknesses, companies are now looking for workers who have the strengths that match particular jobs. Ryan shows readers how to identify those strengths and use that knowledge to advance their careers and better promote themselves to prospective employers. She shows how to establish an appealing career identity using self-branding tools like résumés, Mind Maps, and on-the-job success stories, and outlines fresh approaches to networking with colleagues and negotiating with bosses. Savvy and entertaining, Soaring on Your Strengths will be the job and promotion seekers guide for the twenty-first century. In Soaring on Your Strengths, Ryan shows you how to: identify your most marketable qualities and strengths self-promote and brand yourself for the best jobs and promotions. establish an appealing career identity implement fresh approaches to networking with colleagues improve your relationship with the boss Filled with her client success stories, solid strategies, and smart, easy-to-follow advice, this book is the next best thing to having your own career coach on-call to advance your career and prosper. .

The Great Influenza

by John M. Barry

At the height of WWI, history's most lethal influenza virus erupted in an army camp in Kansas, moved east with American troops, then exploded, killing as many as 100 million people worldwide. It killed more people in twenty-four months than AIDS killed in twenty-four years, more in a year than the Black Death killed in a century. But this was not the Middle Ages, and 1918 marked the first collision of science and epidemic disease. Magisterial in its breadth of perspective and depth of research and now revised to reflect the growing danger of the avian flu, The Great Influenza is ultimately a tale of triumph amid tragedy, which provides us with a precise and sobering model as we confront the epidemics looming on our own horizon. John M. Barry has written a new afterword for this edition that brings us up to speed on the terrible threat of the avian flu and suggest ways in which we might head off another flu pandemic.

Common Sense

by Thomas Paine

". . . well orated by reader George Vafiadis. The language and sentiment are not as outmoded as some listeners might expect and it definitely feels patriotic to hear again the fundamentals of America's beginnings. " - - Kliatt MagazineGeorge Washington wrote, "I find that Common Sense is working a powerful change there (Virginia) in the minds of many men. " The passion of the patriot Thomas Paine comes straight on and one can better understand the forces that shaped this country. Thomas Painewas born in Thetford, England, in 1737. His father was a staymaker. Thomas worked as a tax collector and was let go for petitioning for higher pay. Benjamin Franklin encouraged him to emigrate to the United States in 1774, where he published a series of pamphlets called the American Crisis. In 1787 he went back to Europe and published political books that were publically burned. He went to France and helped draft the French constitution. He was imprisoned for a year before coming back to the United States. He died in 1809.

The Fall of Baghdad

by Jon Lee Anderson

For every great historical event, seemingly, at least one reporter writes an eyewitness account of such power and literary weight that it becomes joined with its subject in our minds-George Orwell's Homage to Cataloniaand the Spanish Civil War; John Hersey's Hiroshimaand the dropping of the first atomic bomb; Philip Gourevitch's We Wish to Inform You That Tomorrow We Will Be Killed with Our Families: Stories of Rwandaand the Rwandan genocide. Whatever else is written about the Iraqi people and the fall of Saddam, Jon Lee Anderson's The Fall of Baghdadis worthy of mention in this company. No subject has become more hotly politicized than the toppling of Saddam Hussein's regime, and so a thick fog of propaganda, both from boosters of the war and its opponents, has obscured the reality of what the Iraqi people have endured and are enduring, under Saddam Hussein and now. For that reason alone, The Fall of Baghdadis a great and necessary book. Jon Lee Anderson has drawn on all of his reserves of stamina and personal bravery to create an astonishing portrait of humanity in extremis, a work of great wisdom, human empathy, and moral clarity. He follows a remarkable and diverse group of Iraqis over the course of this extraordinary time: from the all-pervasive fear that comes from living under Saddam's brutal, Orwellian rule to the surreal atmosphere of Baghdad before the invasion; to the invasion's commencement and the regime's death spiral down into its terrible endgame; to America's disastrously ill-conceived seizure of power and its fruits. In channeling a tragedy of epic dimensions through the stories of real people caught up in the whirlwind of history, Jon Lee Anderson has written a book of timeless significance.

Politics: Observations & Arguments, 1966-2004

by Hendrik Hertzberg

Cause for jubilation: At last, one of America's wisest and most necessary voices has distilled what he knows about politics, broadly speaking, into one magnificent volume. Imagine if the Rolling Stones were just now releasing its first greatest hits album, and you'll have some idea of how long overdue, and highly anticipated, Politicsis. Here are Hendrik Hertzberg's most significant and hilarious and devastating and infuriating dispatches from the American scene-a scene he has chronicled for four decades with an uncanny blend of moral seriousness, high spirits, and perfect rhetorical pitch. Politicsis at once the story of American life from LBJ to GWB and a testament to the power of the written word in the right hands. In those hands, everything seems like politics, and politics has never seemed more interesting. Hertzberg breaks down American politics into component parts-campaigns, debates, rhetoric, the media, wars (cultural, countercultural, and real), high crimes and misdemeanors, the right, and more-and draws the choicest, most telling pieces from his body of work to illuminate each, beginning each section with a new piece of writing framing the subject at hand. Politics 101 from the master, Politicsis also an immensely rich and entertaining mosaic of American life from the mid-1960s to the mid-2000s-a ride through recent American history with one of the most insightful and engaging guides imaginable.

The Americanization of Benjamin Franklin

by Gordon S. Wood

Central to America's idea of itself is the character of Benjamin Franklin. We all know him, or think we do: In recent works and in our inherited conventional wisdom, he remains fixed in place as a genial polymath and self-improver who was so very American that he is known by us all as the first American. The problem with this beloved notion of Franklin's quintessential Americanness, Gordon Wood shows us in this marvelous, revelatory book, is that it's simply not true. And it blinds us to the no less admirable or important but far more interesting man Franklin really was and leaves us powerless to make sense of the most crucial events of his life. Indeed, thinking of Franklin as the last American would be less of a hindrance to understanding many crucial aspects of his life-his preoccupation with becoming a gentleman; his longtime loyalty to the Crown and burning ambition to be a player in the British Empire's power structure; the personal character of his conversion to revolutionary; his reasons for writing the Autobiography; his controversies with John and Samuel Adams and with Congress; his love of Europe and conflicted sense of national identity; the fact that his death was greeted by mass mourning in France and widely ignored in America. But Franklin did become the Revolution's necessary man, Wood shows, second behind George Washington. Why was his importance so denigrated in his own lifetime and his image so distorted ever since? Ironically, Franklin's diplomacy in France, which was essential to American victory, was the cause of the suspicion that clouded his good name at home-and also the stage on which the "first American" persona made its debut. The consolidation of this mirage of Franklin would await the early nineteenth century, though, when the mask he created in his posthumously published Autobiography proved to be the model the citizens of a striving young democracy needed. The Americanization of Benjamin Franklin is a landmark work, a magnificent fresh vision of Franklin's life and reputation, filled with profound insights into the Revolution and into the emergence of America's idea of itself.

A Call to Service

by John Kerry

"John Kerry has had a remarkable life and is one of the most respected public servants in America today, having come to the forefront of national consciousness as a veteran speaking out against the Vietnam War just after he returned from the front lines. He is one of the most powerful leaders of the Democratic Party and-with a fierce landmark presidential campaign looming before the 2004 election-could one day become the most powerful man in the world. As an outsider among insiders in the U. S. Senate, John Kerry has never been afraid to battle the political establishment and fight the fights that need fighting. Now, in A Call to Service, Kerry formally introduces himself to the nation. In a book rich with autobiographical details that explain the experiences behind the ideas, Kerry offers his vision for America. "

Ten Minutes From Normal

by Karen Hughes

"The rule of thumb in any White House is that nobody is indispensable except the president," said The New York Times, "but Karen Hughes has come as close to that description as any recent presidential aide. " Karen Hughes has worked beside President George W. Bush since, as she says, "the motorcade was only one car and he was sometimes the one driving it. " As counselor to the president, she brought the working mom's perspective to the White House, often asking of President Bush's policies, "What does this mean for the average person?"Yet the move from Texas to Washington was hard on her family, and in a controversial, headline-making decision that reverberated across America, she chose to place family first and quit the nation's capital to return to Austin. There, Hughes continues to advise the president, where the kitchen wall calendar marks the State of the Union message side by side with her son's orthodontist appointments. In this disarmingly down-to-earth, warm, often funny, and frank book, Hughes looks at her unique career in George W. Bush's inner circle and the universal concerns of balancing work and family. Ten Minutes from Normal-the title comes from the campaign trail--is a remarkable blend of the story of a "normal" woman who rose to great heights and an insightful look at American politics and America's forty-third president. This is a book for the legions of women and men everywhere who are seeking new inspiration for how to remember their priorities and achieve balance in their lives. Most important, in a post-9/11 world, Hughes redefines the very notion of what is "normal" as something special and precious, never to be taken for granted in America again.

Crazy Horse

by Larry Mcmurtry

Legends cloud the life of Crazy Horse, an enigma even to his own people in his own day. His story remains an encapsulation of the Native American tragedy and the death of the untamed West. Larry McMurtry's account strips away the tall tales to reveal the essence of this brilliant warrior-hero as he captures the poignant passing of an era and offers a vibrant new understanding of the mythic Crazy Horse and what he stood for.

Alexander Hamilton

by Ron Chernow

In the first full-length biography of Alexander Hamilton in decades, National Book Award winner Ron Chernow tells the riveting story of a man who overcame all odds to shape, inspire, and scandalize the newborn America. According to historian Joseph Ellis, Alexander Hamilton is "a robust full-length portrait, in my view the best ever written, of the most brilliant, charismatic and dangerous founder of them all. " Few figures in American history have been more hotly debated or more grossly misunderstood than Alexander Hamilton. Chernow's biography gives Hamilton his due and sets the record straight, deftly illustrating that the political and economic greatness of today's America is the result of Hamilton's countless sacrifices to champion ideas that were often wildly disputed during his time. "To repudiate his legacy," Chernow writes, "is, in many ways, to repudiate the modern world. " Chernow here recounts Hamilton's turbulent life: an illegitimate, largely self-taught orphan from the Caribbean, he came out of nowhere to take America by storm, rising to become George Washington's aide-de-camp in the Continental Army, coauthoring The Federalist Papers, founding the Bank of New York, leading the Federalist Party, and becoming the first Treasury Secretary of the United States. Historians have long told the story of America's birth as the triumph of Jefferson's democratic ideals over the aristocratic intentions of Hamilton. Chernow presents an entirely different man, whose legendary ambitions were motivated not merely by self-interest but by passionate patriotism and a stubborn will to build the foundations of American prosperity and power. His is a Hamilton far more human than we've encountered before--from his shame about his birth to his fiery aspirations, from his intimate relationships with childhood friends to his titanic feuds with Jefferson, Madison, Adams, Monroe, and Burr, and from his highly public affair with Maria Reynolds to his loving marriage to his loyal wife Eliza. And never before has there been a more vivid account of Hamilton's famous and mysterious death in a duel with Aaron Burr in July of 1804. Chernow's biography is not just a portrait of Hamilton, but the story of America's birth seen through its most central figure. At a critical time to look back to our roots, Alexander Hamilton will remind readers of the purpose of our institutions and our heritage as Americans. .

Free Culture

by Lawrence Lessig

Lawrence Lessig, "the most important thinker on intellectual property in the Internet era" (The New Yorker), masterfully argues that never before in human history has the power to control creative progress been so concentrated in the hands of the powerful few, the so-called Big Media. Never before have the cultural powers- that-be been able to exert such control over what we can and can't do with the culture around us. Our society defends free markets and free speech; why then does it permit such top-down control? To lose our long tradition of free culture, Lawrence Lessig shows us, is to lose our freedom to create, our freedom to build, and, ultimately, our freedom to imagine. .

The Book on Bush

by Eric Alterman Mark Green

Not since Richard Nixon's heyday has there been a more controversial president capable of polarizing public opinion than George W. Bush. From his arrival in office through what many still regard as one of the most flagrant miscarriages of electoral justice in modern history to the long road to Iraq, liberals have vilified Bush as ardently as neoconservatives have embraced him. Both Alterman and Green are known for their doggedness in researching the media and political figures, and what they discover in the case of Bush is a consistent pattern of double standards, misrepresentation, and contradictions. The Book on Bush methodically critiques Administration policy from the standpoint of its truthfulness as well as its merit, with the characteristic wit of both writers.

American Dynasty

by Kevin Phillips

The Bushes are the family nobody really knows, says Kevin Phillips. This popular lack of acquaintance--nurtured by gauzy imagery of Maine summer cottages, gray-haired national grandmothers, July Fourth sparklers, and cowboy boots--has let national politics create a dynasticized presidency that would have horrified America's founding fathers. They, after all, had led a revolution against a succession of royal Georges. In this devastating book, onetime Republican strategist Phillips reveals how four generations of Bushes have ascended the ladder of national power since World War One, becoming entrenched within the American establishment--Yale, Wall Street, the Senate, the CIA, the vice presidency, and the presidency--through a recurrent flair for old-boy networking, national security involvement, and political deception. By uncovering relationships and connecting facts with new clarity, Phillips comes to a stunning conclusion: The Bush family has systematically used its financial and social empire--its "aristocracy"--to gain the White House, thereby subverting the very core of American democracy. In their ambition, the Bushes ultimately reinvented themselves with brilliant timing, twisting and turning from silver spoon Yankees to born-again evangelical Texans. As America--and the world--holds its breath for the 2004 presidential election, American Dynasty explains how it happened and what it all means. .

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

by James Joyce

Playful and experimental, James Joyce's autobiographical A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man is a vivid portrayal of emotional and intellectual development. This Penguin Modern Classics edition is edited with an introduction and notes by Seamus Deane. The portrayal of Stephen Dedalus's Dublin childhood and youth, his quest for identity through art and his gradual emancipation from the claims of family, religion and Ireland itself, is also an oblique self-portrait of the young James Joyce and a universal testament to the artist's 'eternal imagination'. Both an insight into Joyce's life and childhood, and a unique work of modernist fiction, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man is a novel of sexual awakening, religious rebellion and the essential search for voice and meaning that every nascent artist must face in order to fully come into themselves. James Joyce (1882-1941), the eldest of ten children, was born in Dublin, but exiled himself to Paris at twenty as a rebellion against his upbringing. He only returned to Ireland briefly from the continent but Dublin was at heart of his greatest works, Ulysses and Finnegans Wake. He lived in poverty until the last ten years of his life and was plagued by near blindness and the grief of his daughter's mental illness. If you enjoyed A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, you might like Joyce's Dubliners, also available in Penguin Modern Classics. 'There is nothing more vivid or beautiful in all Joyce's writing. It has the searing clarity of truth . . . but is rich with myth and symbol'Sunday Times 'James Joyce was and remains almost unique among novelists in that he published nothing but masterpieces'The Times Literary Supplement

The Awakening and Selected Stories

by Kate Chopin

The Awakening shocked turn-of-the-century readers and reviewers with its treatment of sex and suicide. In a departure from literary convention, Kate Chopin failed to condemn her heroine's desire for an affair with the son of a Louisiana resort owner, whom she meets on vacation. The power of sensuality, the delusion of ecstatic love, and the solitude that accompanies the trappings of middle- and upper-class convention are themes of this now-classic novel. The book was influenced by French writers ranging from Flaubert to Maupassant, and can be seen as a precursor of the impressionistic, mood-driven novels of Virginia Woolf and Djuna Barnes. Variously called "vulgar," "unhealthily introspective," and "morbid," the book was neglected for several decades, not least because it was written by a "regional" woman writer. This edition also includes selected stories from Kate Chopin's Bayou Folk and A Night in Acadie, and an introduction and notes by Nina Baym.

The Waste Land and Other Poems

by T. S. Eliot

While recovering from a mental collapse in a Swiss sanitarium in 1921, T. S. Eliot finished what became the definitive poem of the modern condition, one that still casts a large and ominous shadow over twentieth-century poetry. Built upon the imagery of the Grail legend, the Fisher King, and ancient fertility cults, The Waste Land is both a poetic diagnosis of an ailing civilization and a desperate quest for spiritual renewal. Through pastiche and collage Eliot unfolds a nightmarish landscape of sexual disorder and spiritual desolation, inhabited by the voice (literary, historical, mythic, contemporary) of an unconscious that is at turns deeply personal and culturally collective. This edition includes The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock, Portrait of a Lady, Gerontion, and more.

The Big Field

by Mike Lupica

Playing shortstop is a way of life for Hutch-not only is his hero, Derek Jeter, a shortstop, but so was his father, a former local legend turned pro. Which is why having to play second base feels like demotion to second team. Yet that's where Hutch ends up after Darryl "D-Will" Williams, the best shortstop prospect since A-Rod, joins the team. But Hutch is nothing if not a team player, and he's cool with playing in D-Will's shadow-until, that is, the two shortstops in Hutch's life betray him in a way he never could have imagined. With the league championship on the line, just how far is Hutch willing to bend to be a good teammate?

Highway Cats

by Janet Taylor Lisle

When three kittens are thrown off the back of a truck, none of the highway cats knows what to make of them. They seem to have an appeal?an energy, even?that Khalia Koo, Jolly Roger, and the rest of the mangy, feral cats don?t understand. But there are bigger issues to figure out when the bulldozers start coming, threatening to demolish their homes as well as several historical landmarks. Can three little kittens be the answer to saving the town? .

Thirteen

by Lauren Myracle

Winnie Perry is a teenager--at last! And it's a really big deal. A ginormous deal, which, wouldn't you know it, brings ginormous problems along with it. Winnie's bff #1 is growing up too slowly, while her bff #2 is growing up too fast, leaving Winnie stuck in the middle. Winnie's boyfriend, Lars, is fabulous--except when he's not. And as for Winnie's family, well, BIG changes are in the air. Bestselling author Lauren Myracle concludes her enormously popular trilogy about a winning young heroine whose humor, daring, and compassion for others is infectious and unforgettable. .

Simon Bloom, The Gravity Keeper

by Michael Reisman

Ordinary sixth-grader Simon Bloom has just made the biggest discovery since gravity-and it literally fell into his lap. Or onto his head, anyway. You see, Simon has found the Teacher's Edition of Physics, a magical reference book containing the very formulas that control the laws that govern the universe! By reciting the formulas out loud, he's able to do the impossible-like reverse the force of gravity to float weightlessly, and reduce friction to zoom across any surface! But a book that powerful isn't safe with Simon for long. Before he knows it, he is being pursued by evil forces bent on gaining control of the formulas. And they'll do anything to retrieve them. Now, Simon and his friends must use their wits and the magic of science in a galactic battle for the book, and the future of the universe, in this funny, fast-paced science fiction adventure from first-time author Michael Reisman.

Gods of Manhattan

by Scott Mebus

Thirteen-year-old New Yorker Rory Hennessy can see things no one else can. When a magician's trick opens his eyes to Mannahatta, Rory finds an amazing spirit city coexisting alongside modern-day Manhattan. A place where Indian sachems, warrior cockroaches, and papier-mƒch, children live, ruled by the immortal Gods of Manhattan - including Babe Ruth, Alexander Hamilton, and Peter Stuyvesant. But Rory's power to see Mannahatta brings danger, and he is pursued by enemies, chasing history and trying to free those who have been enslaved. And when he is given the chance to right Mannahatta's greatest wrong, seeing Mannahatta may not be a gift after all. . . . .

Seeing Redd

by Frank Beddor

The second gripping instalment of the New York Times best-selling trilogy The Looking Glass Wars from award-winning author and Hollywood film-maker Frank Beddor. Behind a pack of cards are a pack of lies. Find out what really happened to Alice in Wonderland! Alyss of Wonderland's rule has only just begun, but the Queendom and her White Imagination are already under threat. Someone has resurrected the brutal Glass Eyes, and they are attacking Wonderland on all sides. Has renegade Redd Heart freed herself and her assassin Cat from the prism of the Heart Crystal? Can Alyss trust Boarderland's King Arch, as he extends a benevolent helping hand? A battle is raging but who is the enemy? Return to the dazzling world of The Looking Glass Wars as Wonderland is fantastically brought to life again by acclaimed Hollywood producer, Frank Beddor.

Samuel Blink and the Forbidden Forest

by Matt Haig

Funny and captivating fantasy from rising star Matt Haig! Samuel and Martha?s new life with their Aunt Eda in Norway is filled with rules, but most important is rule number nine: NEVER?UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES? GO INTO THE FOREST. Sure their Uncle Henrik disappeared in the forest ten years ago, but it can?t be the forest?s fault?can it? Samuel is skeptical until he finds an unusual book, The Creatures of Shadow Forest, which describes the fantastic and sinister creatures supposedly living there. Could Aunt Eda be right? Samuel discovers the truth about the forest?s dangerous secrets when Martha becomes lost in the forest, and it?s up to him to save her. .

Twisted

by Laurie Halse Anderson

High school senior Tyler Miller used to be the kind of guy who faded into the background#151;average student, average looks, average dysfunctional family. But since he got busted for doing graffiti on the school, and spent the summer doing outdoor work to pay for it, he stands out like you wouldn't believe. His new physique attracts the attention of queen bee Bethany Milbury, who just so happens to be his father's boss's daughter, the sister of his biggest enemy#151;and Tyler's secret crush. And that sets off a string of events and changes that have Tyler questioning his place in the school, in his family, and in the world. In Twisted, the acclaimed Laurie Halse Anderson tackles a very controversial subject: what it means to be a man today. Fans and new readers alike will be captured by Tyler's pitchperfect, funny voice, the surprising narrative arc, and the thoughtful moral dilemmas that are at the heart of all of the author's award-winning, widely read work.

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