Browse Results What Format Should I Choose?

Showing 176 through 200 of 11,017 results

The Line through the Heart

by J. Budziszewski

The suicidal proclivity of our time, writes the acclaimed philosopher J. Budziszewski, is to deny the obvious. Our hearts are riddled with desires that oppose their deepest longings, because we demand to have happiness on terms that make happiness impossible. Why? And what can we do about it?Budziszewski addresses these vital questions in his brilliantly persuasive new book, The Line Through the Heart. The answers can be discovered in an exploration of natural law--a venture that, with Budziszewski as our expert guide, takes us through politics, religion, ethics, law, philosophy, and more.Natural law, the author states plainly but provocatively, is a fact about human beings; as surely as we have hands and feet, we have the foundational principles of good and evil woven into the fabric of our minds. From this elemental fact emerges a natural law theory that unfolds as part of a careful study of the human person. Thus, Budziszewski shows, natural law forms a common ground for humanity.But this common ground is slippery. While natural law is truly an observable part of human nature, human beings are hell-bent--quite literally--on ignoring it. The mere mention of the obligations imposed on man by his nature will send him into a rage. In this sense, The Line Through the Heart explores natural law as not simply a fact and a theory but also a sign of contradiction.While investigating the natural law and its implications, Budziszewski boldly confronts--and offers a newly integrated view of--a wide range of contemporary issues, including abortion, evolution, euthanasia, capital punishment, the courts, and the ersatz state religion being built in the name of religious toleration.Written in Budziszewski's usual crystalline style, The Line Through the Heart makes clear that natural law is a matter of concern not merely to scholars; it touches how each of us lives, and how all of us live together. His profoundly important examination of this subject helps us make sense of why habits that run against our nature have become second nature, and why our world seems to be going mad.

Little Chicago

by Adam Rapp

Little Chicago opens in the office of Children's Services, where eleven-year-old Blacky Brown is being interviewed by a social worker who is trying to determine what has happened to him. At first, Blacky's emotions are blocked, but then he reveals that he has been sexually abused by his mother's boyfriend, and is released into his mother's custody. Thus begins an alternately harrowing and hopeful story of a brave boy's attempts to come to grips with a grim reality Mary Jane, a classmate who is similarly ostracized, tries to help Blackie, but he soon takes refuge instead in the gun that he buys easily from his sister's boyfriend. Little Chicago is an unblinking look at the world of a child who has been neglected and abused. It portrays head-on the indifference and hostility of classmates, teachers, and even Blacky's mother, once these people learn his "secret." Like Sura in The Buffalo Tree and Whensday in The Copper Elephant, Blacky is one of Adam Rapp's mesmerizing voices, more so because it is a voice so rarely heard.

The Roots of American Order

by Russell Kirk

What holds America together? In this classic work, Russell Kirk describes the beliefs and institutions that have nurtured the American soul and commonwealth. Beginning with the Hebrew prophets, Kirk examines in dramatic fashion the sources of American order. His analytical narrative might be called "a tale of five cities": Jerusalem, Athens, Rome, London, and Philadelphia. For an understanding of the significance of America at the dawn of a new century, Russell Kirk's masterpiece on the history of American civilization is unsurpassable. This edition includes a new foreword by the distinguished historian Forrest McDonald.

The Politics of Prudence

by Russell Kirk

In this classic title, Kirk outlines ten principles of conservative thought, summarizes ten vital conservative books, and offers brief accounts of ten eminent, internationally important conservatives. This book, written by the founder of modern conservatism in America, reflects several decades of learning, travel, and practical politics.

A Humane Economy

by Wilhelm Röpke

"A Humane Economy is like a seminar on integral freedom conducted by a professor of uncommon brilliance." --Wall Street Journal"If any person in our contemporary world is entitled to a hearing it is Wilhelm Röpke." --New York TimesA Humane Economy offers one of the most accessible and compelling explanations of how economies operate ever written. The masterwork of the great twentieth-century economist Wilhelm Röpke, this book presents a sweeping, brilliant exposition of market mechanics and moral philosophy.Röpke cuts through the jargon and statistics that make most economic writing so obscure and confusing. Over and over, the great Swiss economist stresses one simple point: you cannot separate economic principles from human behavior.Röpke's observations are as relevant today as when they were first set forth a half century ago. He clearly demonstrates how those societies that have embraced free-market principles have achieved phenomenal economic success--and how those that cling to theories of economic centralization endure stagnation and persistent poverty.A Humane Economy shows how economic processes and government policies influence our behavior and choices--to the betterment or detriment of life in those vital and highly fragile human structures we call communities. "It is the precept of ethical and humane behavior, no less than of political wisdom," Röpke reminds us, "to adapt economic policy to man, not man to economic policy."

The Humane Vision of Wendell Berry

by Mark Mitchell Nathan Schlueter

A striking contribution to the conversation that is conservatismWendell Berry--poet, novelist, essayist, critic, farmer--has won the admiration of Americans from all walks of life and from across the political spectrum. His writings treat an extraordinary range of subjects, including politics, economics, ecology, farming, work, marriage, religion, and education. But as this enlightening new book shows, such diverse writings are united by a humane vision that finds its inspiration in the great moral and literary tradition of the West.In The Humane Vision of Wendell Berry, Mark T. Mitchell and Nathan Schlueter bring together a distinguished roster of writers to critically engage Berry's ideas. The volume features original contributions from Rod Dreher, Anthony Esolen, Allan Carlson, Richard Gamble, Jason Peters, Anne Husted Burleigh, Patrick J. Deneen, Caleb Stegall, Luke Schlueter, Matt Bonzo, Michael Stevens, D. G. Hart, Mark Shiffman, and William Edmund Fahey, as well as a classic piece by Wallace Stegner.Together, these authors situation Berry's ideas within the larger context of conservative thought. His vision stands for reality in all its facets and against all reductive "isms"--for intellect against intellectualism, individuality against individualism, community against communitarianism, liberty against libertarianism. Wendell Berry calls his readers to live lives of gratitude, responsibility, friendship, and love--notions that, as this important new book makes clear, should be at the heart of a thoughtful and coherent conservatism.

The Conservative Intellectual Movement in America Since 1945

by George H. Nash

First published in 1976, and revised in 1996, George H. Nash's celebrated history of the postwar conservative intellectual movement has become the unquestioned standard in the field. This new edition, published in commemoration of the volume's thirtieth anniversary, includes a new preface by Nash and will continue to instruct anyone interested in how today's conservative movement was born.

Seize Freedom!

by Thaddeus G. Mccotter

Right now, parents suffer sleepless nights worrying that they will lose their jobs, their homes, and their hopes for their children. Citizens struggle to make sense of an increasingly perverse society disdainful of--and destructive to--the traditional culture of faith, truth, virtue, and beauty. Government--under both parties--has swollen to grotesque proportions, racked up staggering debt, and become a threat to Americans' freedom.Former congressman Thaddeus McCotter makes a spirited cry for sanity in a chaotic age. Seize Freedom! boldly confronts a quartet of generational challenges that too many leaders ignore or belittle, and charts the path of truth and renewal for America.So many of our problems, the author shows, have been exacerbated by ideology, which John Adams aptly called the "science of idiocy." With incisive thought and wicked humor McCotter attacks the idiocy that pervades Washington.Seize Freedom! is a guide for those concerned citizens and committed conservatives who wish to put an end to the ideologues' simplistic solutions and false comforts. Well, that, and for anyone who wants a remedy for the usual ghostwritten claptrap that passes for "policy" or "campaign" books. This book won't make you happier, but it will make you smarter.

Rendezvous with Destiny

by Craig Shirley

"A first-rate work of insider his­tory . . . A monumental accomplishment." --National Review The election that changed everything: Craig Shirley's masterful account of the 1980 presidential campaign reveals how a race judged "too close to call" as late as Election Day became a Reagan landslide--and altered the course of history. To write Rendezvous with Destiny, Shirley gained unprecedented access to 1980 campaign files and interviewed more than 150 insiders--from Reagan's closest advisers and family members to Jimmy Carter himself. His gripping account follows Reagan's unlikely path from his bitter defeat on the floor of the 1976 Republican convention, through his underreported "wilderness years," through grueling primary fights in which he knocked out several Republican heavyweights, through an often-nasty general election campaign complicated by the presence of a third-party candidate (not to mention the looming shadow of Ted Kennedy), to Reagan's astounding victory on Election Night in 1980. Shirley's years of intensive research have enabled him to relate countless untold stories--including, at long last, the solution to one of the most enduring mysteries in politics: just how Reagan's campaign got hold of Carter's debate briefing books.

Redeeming Economics

by John D. Mueller

"Groundbreaking." --Washington ExaminerEconomics is primed for--and in desperate need of--a revolution, respected economic forecaster John D. Mueller shows in this eye-opening book. To make the leap forward will require looking backward, for as Redeeming Economics reveals, the most important element of economic theory has been ignored for more than two centuries.Since the great Adam Smith tore down this pillar of economic thought, economic theory has been unable to account for a fundamental aspect of human experience: the relationships that define us, the loves (and hates) that motivate and distinguish us as persons. In trying to reduce human behavior to exchanges, modern economists have forgotten how these essential motivations are expressed: as gifts (or their opposite, crimes). Mueller makes economics whole again, masterfully reapplying the economic thought of Aristotle, Augustine, and Aquinas.

Modern and American Dignity

by Peter Lawler

An Indispensable Guide to Our Most Pressing Moral and Political DebatesThe horrors of the twentieth century exposed the insufficiency of speaking of human rights. In intending to extinguish whole classes of human beings, the Nazis and Communists did something much worse than violating rights; they aimed to reduce us all to less than who we really are. As political philosopher Peter Augustine Lawler shows in this illuminating book, rights are insecure without some deeper notion of human dignity.The threats to human dignity remain potent today--all the more so for being less obvious. Our anxious and aging society has embraced advances in science, technology, and especially biotechnology--from abortion and embryonic stem-cell research to psychopharmacology, cosmetic surgery and neurology, genetic manipulation, and the detachment of sex from reproduction. But such technical advances can come at the expense of our natural and creaturely dignity, of what we display when we know who we are and what we're supposed to do. Our lives will only become more miserably confused if we cannot speak confidently about human dignity.In Modern and American Dignity, Lawler, who served on President George W. Bush's Council on Bioethics, reveals the intellectual and cultural trends that threaten our confidence in human dignity. Exploring a wide range of topics with wit and elegance, Lawler has provided an indispensable guide to today's complex political, bioethical, and cultural debates.

It Takes a Family

by Rick Santorum

Rick Santorum made his name in the 2012 presidential race with his principled conservatism. To understand Santorum's worldview and vision for America, there is no better source than his New York Times bestselling book, It Takes a Family.It Takes a Family is one of the most profound and comprehensive books of political thought ever written by a politician. Santorum offers a penetrating look at the social, political, and economic shifts that have hurt American families--and a principled, genuinely conservative plan for reversing this slide.Here Santorum explains his core beliefs, laying out a humane vision that he believes must inform public policy if it is to be effective and just. Politicians of both parties, he shows, fail to address the way Americans truly live their lives: in families, neighborhoods, churches, and communities. It Takes a Family is animated by an appreciation for the civic bonds that unite a community--an appreciation that lies at the heart of genuine conservatism.

It Didn’t Have to Be This Way

by Harry C. Veryser

"Excellent . . . I highly recommend this book." --RON PAULWhy is the boom-and-bust cycle so persistent? Why did economists fail to predict the economic meltdown that began in 2007--or to pull us out of the crisis more quickly? And how can we prevent future calamities?Mainstream economics has no adequate answers for these pressing questions. To understand how we got here, and how we can ensure prosperity, we must turn to an alternative to the dominant approach: the Austrian School of economics.Unfortunately, few people have even a vague understanding of the Austrian School, despite the prominence of leading figures such as Nobel Prize winner F. A. Hayek, author of The Road to Serfdom. Harry C. Veryser corrects that problem in this powerful and eye-opening book. In presenting the Austrian School's perspective, he reveals why the boom-and-bust cycle is unnatural and unnecessary.Veryser tells the fascinating (but frightening) story of how our modern economic condition developed. The most recent recession, far from being an isolated incident, was part of a larger cycle that has been the scourge of the West for a century--a cycle rooted in government manipulation of markets and currency. The lesson is clear: the devastation of the recent economic crisis--and of stagflation in the 1970s, and of the Great Depression in the 1930s--could have been avoided. It didn't have to be this way.Too long unappreciated, the Austrian School of economics reveals the crucial conditions for a successful economy and points the way to a free, prosperous, and humane society.

History and the Human Condition

by John Lukacs

In a career spanning more than sixty-five years, John Lukacs has established himself as one of our most accomplished historians. Now, in the stimulating book History and the Human Condition, Lukacs offers his profound reflections on the very nature of history, the role of the historian, the limits of knowledge, and more.Guiding us on a quest for knowledge, Lukacs ranges far and wide over the past two centuries. The pursuit takes us from Alexis de Tocqueville to the atomic bomb, from American "exceptionalism" to Nazi expansionism, from the closing of the American frontier to the passing of the modern age.Lukacs's insights about the past have important implications for the present and future. In chronicling the twentieth-century decline of liberalism and rise of conservatism, for example, he forces us to rethink the terms of the liberal-versus-conservative debate. In particular, he shows that what passes for "conservative" in the twenty-first century often bears little connection to true conservatism.Lukacs concludes by shifting his gaze from the broad currents of history to the world immediately around him. His reflections on his home, his town, his career, and his experiences as an immigrant to the United States illuminate deeper truths about America, the unique challenges of modernity, the sense of displacement and atomization that increasingly characterizes twenty-first-century life, and much more. Moving and insightful, this closing section focuses on the human in history, masterfully displaying how right Lukacs is in his contention that history, at its best, is personal and participatory.History and the Human Condition is a fascinating work by one of the finest historians of our time. More than that, it is perhaps John Lukacs's final word on the great themes that have defined him as a historian and a writer.

Herbert Butterfield

by Kenneth Mcintyre

"The most original historian of his generation"That is how the celebrated British academic Noel Annan described Herbert Butterfield (1900-1979), a profound and prolific writer who made important contributions as both a public and academic historian.In this authoritative and accessible intellectual biography, Kenneth B. McIntyre explores the extraordinary range of Butterfield's work. He shows why the small book The Whig Interpretation of History (1931) achieved such large influence; Butterfield, he demonstrates, has profoundly shaped American and European historiography by highlighting the distortions that occur when historians interpret the past merely as steps along the way toward the glorious present.But McIntyre delves much deeper, examining everything from Butterfield's lectures on history, historiography, and Christianity, to his warnings about the dangers of hubris in international affairs, to his essays on the origins of modern science, which basically created the modern discipline of the history of science.This latest volume in ISI Books' acclaimed Library of Modern Thinkers helps us understand a prescient and insightful thinker who challenged dominant currents in history, historiography, international relations, and politics.

Founding Federalist

by Michael Toth

In Founding Federalist, Michael C. Toth provides an in-depth look at the life and work of Oliver Ellsworth, a largely forgotten but eminently important Founding Father.The American Founding was the work of visionaries and revolutionaries. But amid the celebrated luminaries, the historic transformations, the heroic acts, and unforgettable discourses were practical politicians, the consensus builders who made the system work. Oliver Ellsworth--Framer, senator, chief justice, diplomat--was such a leader.Founding Federalist brings to life a figure whose contributions shape American political life even today. Vividly capturing the pivotal debates at Philadelphia in the summer of 1787, Toth shows how Ellsworth was a vital force in shaping the Constitution as a Federalist document, one that did not extinguish the role of the states even as it recognized the need for national institutions. The author illuminates what Ellsworth and other Founders understood to be the meaning of the new constitutional order--a topic highly relevant to twenty-first-century debates about the role of government. Toth, an attorney, also brilliantly analyzes Ellsworth's most important legislative achievement: the creation of the U.S. federal court system.With this insightful new biography, Michael Toth has reclaimed a figure who made crucial contributions to a lasting creation: a federal republic.

Econoclasts

by Brian Domitrovic

The history we can't afford to forgetAt last, the definitive history of supply-side economics--an incredibly timely work that reveals the foundations of America's prosperity when those very foundations are under attack.In the riveting, groundbreaking book Econoclasts, historian Brian Domitrovic tells the remarkable story of the economists, journalists, Washington staffers, and (ultimately) politicians who showed America how to get out of the 1970s stagflation and ushered in an unprecedented quarter-century run of growth and opportunity.Based on the author's years of archival research, Econoclasts is a masterful narrative history in the tradition of Amity Shlaes's The Forgotten Man and John Steele Gordon's An Empire of Wealth.

Daisy and the Girl Scouts

by Fern Brown Marie Dejohn

In this fascinating biography of Juliette Gordon Low, who loved to be called Daisy, readers will learn about her Civil War childhood, her almost complete hearing loss, and her unhappy married life. Most importantly, they will learn about the sense of purpose that drove Juliette Low to found the Girl Scouts of the United States of America--an organization that helped break down cultural restrictions placed on young girls living in the early 1900s.

Forgotten Founder, Drunken Prophet

by Bill Kauffman

The Anti-Federalist Luther Martin of Maryland is known to us--if he is known at all--as the wild man of the Constitutional Convention: a verbose, frequently drunken radical who annoyed the hell out of James Madison, George Washington, Gouverneur Morris, and the other giants responsible for the creation of the Constitution in Philadelphia that summer of 1787. In Bill Kauffman's rollicking account of his turbulent life and times, Martin is still something of a fitfully charming reprobate, but he is also a prophetic voice, warning his heedless contemporaries and his amnesiac posterity that the Constitution, whatever its devisers' intentions, would come to be used as a blueprint for centralized government and a militaristic foreign policy.In Martin's view, the Constitution was the tool of a counterrevolution aimed at reducing the states to ciphers and at fortifying a national government whose powers to tax and coerce would be frightening. Martin delivered the most forceful and sustained attack on the Constitution ever levied--a critique that modern readers might find jarringly relevant. And Martin's post-convention career, though clouded by drink and scandal, found him as defense counsel in two of the great trials of the age: the Senate trial of the impeached Supreme Court justice Samuel Chase and the treason trial of his friend Aaron Burr.Kauffman's Luther Martin is a brilliant and passionate polemicist, a stubborn and admirable defender of a decentralized republic who fights for the principles of 1776 all the way to the last ditch and last drop. In remembering this forgotten founder, we remember also the principles that once animated many of the earliest--and many later--American patriots.

American Cicero

by Bradley J. Birzer

Aristocrat. Catholic. Patriot. Founder.Before his death in 1832, Charles Carroll of Carrollton--the last living signer of the Declaration of Independence--was widely regarded as one of the most important Founders. Today, Carroll's signal contributions to the American Founding are overlooked, but the fascinating new biography American Cicero rescues Carroll from unjust neglect.Drawing on his considerable study of Carroll's published and unpublished writings, historian Bradley J. Birzer masterfully captures a man of supreme intellect, imagination, integrity, and accomplishment. Born a bastard, Carroll nonetheless became the best educated (and wealthiest) Founder. The Marylander's insight, Birzer shows, allowed him to recognize the necessity of independence from Great Britain well before most other Founders. Indeed, Carroll's analysis of the situation in the colonies in the run-up to the Revolution was original and brilliant--yet almost all historians have ignored it. Reflecting his classical and liberal education, the man who would be called "The Last of the Romans" advocated a proper understanding of the American Revolution as deeply rooted in the Western tradition. Carroll even left his mark on the U.S. Constitution despite not assuming his elected position to the Constitutional Convention: by inspiring the creation of the U.S. Senate.American Cicero ably demonstrates how Carroll's Catholicism was integral to his thought. Oppressed because of his faith--Maryland was the most anti-Catholic of the original thirteen colonies--Carroll became the only Roman Catholic to sign the Declaration of Independence and helped legitimize Catholicism in the young American republic.What's more, Birzer brilliantly reassesses the most controversial aspects of Charles Carroll: his aristocratic position and his critiques of democracy. As Birzer shows, Carroll's fears of extreme democracy had ancient and noble roots, and his arguments about the dangers of democracy influenced Alexis de Tocqueville's magisterial work Democracy in America.American Cicero reveals why Founders such as John Adams assumed that Charles Carroll would one day be considered among the greats--and also why history has largely forgotten him.

The Cost of Liberty

by William Murchison

"Makes a powerful and convincing case for restoring John Dickinson to his rightful place in the first rank of the Founders." --The Washington Times The Cost of Liberty offers a sorely needed reassessment of a great patriot and misunderstood Founder. It has been more than a half century since a biography of John Dickinson appeared. Author William Murchison rectifies this mistake, bringing to life one of the most influential figures of the entire Founding period, a principled man whose gifts as writer, speaker, and philosopher only Jefferson came near to matching. In the process, Murchison destroys the caricature of Dickinson that has emerged from such popular treatments as HBO's John Adams miniseries and the Broadway musical 1776. Dickinson is remembered mostly for his reluctance to sign the Declaration of Independence. But that reluctance, Murchison shows, had nothing to do with a lack of patriotism. In fact, Dickinson immediately took up arms to serve the colonial cause--something only one signer of the Declaration did. He stood on principle to oppose declaring independence at that moment, even when he knew that doing so would deal the "finishing blow" to his once-great reputation. Dubbed the "Penman of the Revolution," Dickinson was not just a scribe but also a shaper of mighty events. From the 1760s through the late 1780s he was present at, and played a significant role in, every major assemblage where the Founders charted America's path--a claim few others could make. Author of the landmark essays Letters from a Farmer in Pennsylvania, delegate to the Continental Congress, key figure behind the Articles of Confederation and the Constitution, chief executive of both Pennsylvania and Delaware: Dickinson was, as one esteemed historian aptly put it, "the most underrated of all the Founders." This lively biography gives a great Founder his long-overdue measure of honor.

Living on Fire

by Daniel Kelly

"A triumph . . . A moving, beautifully written biography." --National ReviewFrom the beginning, L. Brent Bozell seemed destined for great things. An extraordinary orator, the young man with fiery red hair won a national debate competition in high school and later was elected president of Yale's storied Political Union, where his debating partner was his close friend William F. Buckley Jr. In less than a decade after graduating from Yale, Bozell helped Buckley launch National Review, became a popular columnist and speaker, and, most famously, wrote Barry Goldwater's landmark book The Conscience of a Conservative. But after setting his sights on high political office, Bozell took a different route in the 1960s. He abruptly moved his family to Spain; he founded a traditional Catholic magazine, Triumph, that quickly turned radical; he repudiated on religious grounds the U.S. Constitution; he made it his mission to transform America into a Catholic nation; he led the nation's first major antiabortion protest (featuring a militant group known as the Sons of Thunder); he severed ties with his erstwhile friends from the conservative movement, including Buckley (who was also his brother-in-law). By the mid-1970s, Bozell had fallen prey to bipolar disorder and alcoholism, leading life as if "manacled to a roller coaster." Biographer Daniel Kelly tells Bozell's remarkable story vividly and with sensitivity in Living on Fire. To write this book, Kelly interviewed dozens of friends and family members and gained unprecedented access to Bozell's private correspondence. The result is a richly textured portrait of a gifted, complex man--his triumphs as well as his struggles.

Dupes

by Paul Kengor

"Nothing short of horrifying . . . In terms of putting the last 100 years in perspective, Dupes may be one of the most significant literary offerings of our time." --Washington TimesIn this startling, intensively researched book, bestselling historian Paul Kengor shines light on a deeply troubling aspect of American history: the prominent role of the "dupe." From the Bolshevik Revolution through the Cold War and right up to the present, many progressives have unwittingly aided some of America's most dangerous opponents.Based on never-before-published FBI files, Soviet archives, and other primary sources, Dupes reveals:*Shocking reports on how Senator Ted Kennedy secretly approached the Soviet leadership to undermine not one but two American presidents*Stunning new evidence that Frank Marshall Davis--mentor to a young Barack Obama--had extensive Communist ties and demonized Democrats*Jimmy Carter's woeful record dealing with America's two chief foes of the past century, Communism and Islamism*Today's dupes, including the congressmen whose overseas anti-American propaganda trip was allegedly financed by foreign intelligence*How Franklin Roosevelt was duped by "Uncle Joe" Stalin--and by a top adviser who may have been a Soviet agent--despite clear warnings from fellow Democrats*How John Kerry's accusations that American soldiers committed war crimes in Vietnam may have been the product of Soviet disinformation*The many Hollywood stars who were duped, including Humphrey Bogart, Lauren Bacall, Katharine Hepburn, Gene Kelly--and even Ronald Reagan

Conscience and Its Enemies

by Robert P. George

Exposing the Dogmas of Liberalism"Many in elite circles yield to the temptation to believe that anyone who disagrees with them is a bigot or a religious fundamentalist. Reason and science, they confidently believe, are on their side. With this book, I aim to expose the emptiness of that belief." --From the introductionAssaults on religious liberty and traditional morality are growing fiercer. Here, at last, is the counterattack.Showcasing the talents that have made him one of America's most acclaimed and influential thinkers, Robert P. George explodes the myth that the secular elite represents the voice of reason. In fact, George shows, it is on the elite side of the cultural divide where the prevailing views frequently are nothing but articles of faith. Conscience and Its Enemies reveals the bankruptcy of these too often smugly held orthodoxies while presenting powerfully reasoned arguments for classical virtues.

Choosing the Right College 2012–2013

by John Zmirak

Choosing the Right College is the most in-depth, independently researched college guide on the market, and the only source for students and parents who want the unvarnished truth about America's top colleges and universities.Updated and expanded, Choosing the Right College 2012-13 features incisive essays, telling statistics, and revealing sidebars on 140 schools--Ivy League institutions, state universities, liberal arts colleges, religious schools, military academies, and lesser-known schools worth a careful look.Here you'll discover information you can't get anywhere else about the intellectual, political, and social conditions at each institution, including:*Insider tips on the best--and worst--departments, courses, and professors*The statistics that colleges don't want you to know*A unique "traffic light" feature--red, yellow, or green--that reveals the state of intellectual freedom and the extent of political correctness on campus*The truth about day-to-day student life: the social scene, living arrangements, campus safety, clubs, sports, traditions, and much more*A roadmap for getting a real education at any school, whether a huge state university or a tiny liberal arts college*Essential financial information, including the extent of need-based financial aid and the average student-debt load of graduates*The most overpriced colleges--and the good values you don't know about "Practically every aspect of university life that a potential student would want to investigate can be found within these pages."--THOMAS E. WOODS JR., Ph.D., bestselling author of Meltdown

Showing 176 through 200 of 11,017 results

Help

Select your format based upon: 1) how you want to read your book, and 2) compatibility with your reading tool. To learn more about using Bookshare with your device, visit the "Using Bookshare" page in the Help Center.

Here is an overview of the specialized formats that Bookshare offers its members with links that go to the Help Center for more information.

  • Bookshare Web Reader - a customized reading tool for Bookshare members offering all the features of DAISY with a single click of the "Read Now" link.
  • DAISY (Digital Accessible Information System) - a digital book file format. DAISY books from Bookshare are DAISY 3.0 text files that work with just about every type of access technology that reads text. Books that contain images will have the download option of ‘DAISY Text with Images’.
  • BRF (Braille Refreshable Format) - digital Braille for use with refreshable Braille devices and Braille embossers.
  • MP3 (Mpeg audio layer 3) - Provides audio only with no text. These books are created with a text-to-speech engine and spoken by Kendra, a high quality synthetic voice from Ivona. Any device that supports MP3 playback is compatible.
  • DAISY Audio - Similar to the Daisy 3.0 option above; however, this option uses MP3 files created with our text-to-speech engine that utilizes Ivona's Kendra voice. This format will work with Daisy Audio compatible players such as Victor Reader Stream and Read2Go.