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Gentleman Troubadours and Andean Pop Stars: Huayno Music, Media Work, and Ethnic Imaginaries in Urban Peru

by Joshua Tucker

Exploring Peru's lively music industry and the studio producers, radio DJs, and program directors that drive it, Gentleman Troubadours and Andean Pop Stars is a fascinating account of the deliberate development of artistic taste. Focusing on popular huayno music and the ways it has been promoted to Peru's emerging middle class, Joshua Tucker tells a complex story of identity making and the marketing forces entangled with it, providing crucial insights into the dynamics among art, class, and ethnicity that reach far beyond the Andes. Tucker focuses on the music of Ayacucho, Peru, examining how media workers and intellectuals there transformed the city's huayno music into the country's most popular style. By marketing contemporary huayno against its traditional counterpart, these agents, Tucker argues, have paradoxically reinforced ethnic hierarchies at the same time that they have challenged them. Navigating between a burgeoning Andean bourgeoisie and a music industry eager to sell them symbols of newfound sophistication, Gentleman Troubadours and Andean Pop Stars is a deep account of the real people behind cultural change.

History's Babel: Scholarship, Professionalization, and the Historical Enterprise in the United States, 1880-1940

by Robert B. Townsend

From the late nineteenth century until World War II, competing spheres of professional identity and practice redrew the field of history, establishing fundamental differences between the roles of university historians, archivists, staff at historical societies, history teachers, and others. aIn "HistoryOCOs Babel," Robert B. Townsend takes us from the beginning of this professional shiftOCowhen the work of history included not just original research, but also teaching and the gathering of historical materialsOCoto a state of microprofessionalization that continues to define the field today. Drawing on extensive research among the records of the American Historical Association and a multitude of other sources, Townsend traces the slow fragmentation of the field from 1880 to the divisions of the 1940s manifest today in the diverse professions of academia, teaching, and public history. By revealing how the founders of the contemporary historical enterprise envisioned the future of the discipline, he offers insight into our own historical moment and the way the discipline has adapted and changed over time. TownsendOCOs work will be of interest not only to historians but to all who care about how the professions of history emerged, how they might go forward, and the public role they still can play.

Contesting Nietzsche

by Christa Davis Acampora

In this groundbreaking work, Christa Davis Acampora offers a profound rethinking of Friedrich NietzscheOCOs crucial notion of the "agon. " Analyzing an impressive array of primary and secondary sources and synthesizing decades of Nietzsche scholarship, she shows how the agon, or contest, organized core areas of NietzscheOCOs philosophy, providing a new appreciation of the subtleties of his notorious views about power. By focusing so intensely on this particular guiding interest, she offers an exciting, original vantage from which to view this iconic thinker: "Contesting Nietzsche. "aThough existenceOCoviewed through the lens of NietzscheOCOs agonOCois fraught with struggle, Acampora illuminates what Nietzsche recognized as the agonOCOs generative benefits. It imbues the human experience with significance, meaning, and value. Analyzing NietzscheOCOs elaborations of agonismOCohis remarks on types of contests, qualities of contestants, and the conditions in which either may thrive or deteriorateOCoshe demonstrates how much the agon shaped his philosophical projects and critical assessments of others. The agon led him from one set of concerns to the next, from aesthetics to metaphysics to ethics to psychology, via Homer, Socrates, Saint Paul, and Wagner. In showing how one obsession catalyzed so many diverse interests, "Contesting Nietzsche" sheds fundamentally new light on some of this philosopherOCOs most difficult and paradoxical ideas.

This Side Jordan: A Novel

by Margaret Laurence

Best known for her novels about the Canadian prairie, Margaret Laurence began her career writing about West Africa. Based on her experience living with her husband on the Gold Coast (now Ghana) in the years just before independence, This Side Jordan confronts issues of race relations, sexism, and colonial exploitation. This lyrical, vivid novel addresses all of the tensions of the time: the excitement, anticipation, and dread felt by both the Africans and the English as they confronted a new order. The book's hero, a school teacher torn between duty to his tribe and aspirations for his country's future in the modern world, names his son "Joshua" as a sign of hope that he will claim and enjoy his homeland. This Side Jordan anticipates many of the political and racial issues that were to plague Ghana over the next fifty years. Evocative and poignant, it is a subtle study of the effects of colonialism, culture clash, and the resilience of hope in new political identity. "Highly recommended as a good and timely read. "--Library Journal

The Prophet's Camel Bell: A Memoir of Somaliland

by Margaret Laurence

In 1950, as a young bride, Margaret Laurence set out with her engineer husband to what was then Somaliland: a British protectorate in North Africa few Canadians had ever heard of. Her account of this voyage into the desert is full of wit and astonishment. Laurence honestly portrays the difficulty of colonial relationships and the frustration of trying to get along with Somalis who had no reason to trust outsiders. There are moments of surprise and discovery when Laurence exclaims at the beauty of a flock of birds only to discover that they are locusts, or offers medical help to impoverished neighbors only to be confronted with how little she can help them. During her stay, Laurence moves past misunderstanding the Somalis and comes to admire memorable individuals: a storyteller, a poet, a camel-herder. The Prophet's Camel Bell is both a fascinating account of Somali culture and British colonial characters, and a lyrical description of life in the desert. "The Prophet's Camel Bell has a timeless feeling about it that sets the work quite apart from the usual books of travel and adventure in distant and exotic parts. "--Canadian Literature

Intimate Matters: A History of Sexuality in America

by John D'Emilio Estelle B. Freedman

The first full length study of the history of sexuality in America, Intimate Matters offers trenchant insights into the sexual behavior of Americans, from colonial times to today. D'Emilio and Freedman give us a deeper understanding of how sexuality has dramatically influenced politics and culture throughout our history. "The book John D'Emilio co-wrote with Estelle B. Freedman, Intimate Matters, was cited by Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy when, writing for a majority of court on July 26, he and his colleagues struck down a Texas law criminalizing sodomy. The decision was widely hailed as a victory for gay rights--and it derived in part, according to Kennedy's written comments, from the information he gleaned from D'Emilio's book, which traces the history of American perspectives on sexual relationships from the nation's founding through the present day. The justice mentioned Intimate Matters specifically in the court's decision."--Julia Keller, Chicago Tribune. "Fascinating... [D'Emilio and Freedman] marshall their material to chart a gradual but decisive shift in the way Americans have understood sex and its meaning in their lives." --Barbara Ehrenreich, New York Times Book Review. "[With] comprehensiveness and care ... D'Emilio and Freedman have surveyed the sexual patters for an entire nation across four centuries." --Martin Bauml Duberman, Nation. "Intimate Matters is comprehensive, meticulous and intelligent." --Jonathan Yardley, Washington Post Book World. "This book is remarkable ... [Intimate Matters] is bound to become the definitive survey of American sexual history for years to come." --Roy Porter, Journal of the History of the Behavioral Sciences.

The Secrets of Alchemy

by Lawrence M. Principe

In The Secrets of Alchemy, Lawrence M. Principe, one of the world's leading authorities on the subject, brings alchemy out of the shadows and restores it to its important place in human history and culture. By surveying what alchemy was and how it began, developed, and overlapped with a range of ideas and pursuits, Principe illuminates the practice. He vividly depicts the place of alchemy during its heyday in early modern Europe, and then explores how alchemy has fit into wider views of the cosmos and humanity, touching on its enduring place in literature, fine art, theater, and religion as well as its recent acceptance as a serious subject of study for historians of science. In addition, he introduces the reader to some of the most fascinating alchemists, such as Zosimos and Basil Valentine, whose lives dot alchemy's long reign from the third century and to the present day. Through his exploration of alchemists and their times, Principe pieces together closely guarded clues from obscure and fragmented texts to reveal alchemy's secrets, and--most exciting for budding alchemists--uses them to recreate many of the most famous recipes in his lab, including those for the "glass of antimony" and "philosophers' tree. " This unique approach brings the reader closer to the actual work of alchemy than any other book.

The Science of Deception: Psychology and Commerce in America

by Michael Pettit

During the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Americans were fascinated with fraud. P. T. Barnum artfully exploited the American yen for deception, and even Mark Twain championed it, arguing that lying was virtuous insofar as it provided the glue for all interpersonal intercourse. But deception was not used solely to delight, and many fell prey to the schemes of con men and the wiles of spirit mediums. As a result, a number of experimental psychologists set themselves the task of identifying and eliminating the illusions engendered by modern, commercial life. By the 1920s, however, many of these same psychologists had come to depend on deliberate misdirection and deceitful stimuli to support their own experiments. "a""The Science of Deception "explores this paradox, weaving together the story of deception in American commercial culture with its growing use in the discipline of psychology. Michael Pettit reveals how deception came to be something that psychologists not only studied but also employed to establish their authority. They developed a host of toolsOCothe lie detector, psychotherapy, an array of personality tests, and moreOCofor making deception more transparent in the courts and elsewhere. PettitOCOs study illuminates the intimate connections between the scientific discipline and the marketplace during a crucial period in the development of market culture. With its broad research and engaging tales of treachery, "The Science of Deception "will appeal to scholars and general readers alike.

Learning Python, 4th Edition

by Mark Lutz

Google and YouTube use Python because it's highly adaptable, easy to maintain, and allows for rapid development. If you want to write high-quality, efficient code that's easily integrated with other languages and tools, this hands-on book will help you be productive with Python quickly -- whether you're new to programming or just new to Python. It's an easy-to-follow self-paced tutorial, based on author and Python expert Mark Lutz's popular training course. Each chapter contains a stand-alone lesson on a key component of the language, and includes a unique Test Your Knowledge section with practical exercises and quizzes, so you can practice new skills and test your understanding as you go. You'll find lots of annotated examples and illustrations to help you get started with Python 3.0. Learn about Python's major built-in object types, such as numbers, lists, and dictionaries Create and process objects using Python statements, and learn Python's general syntax model Structure and reuse code using functions, Python's basic procedural tool Learn about Python modules: packages of statements, functions, and other tools, organized into larger components Discover Python's object-oriented programming tool for structuring code Learn about the exception-handling model, and development tools for writing larger programs Explore advanced Python tools including decorators, descriptors, metaclasses, and Unicode processing

Watching Vesuvius: A History of Science and Culture in Early Modern Italy

by Sean Cocco

Mount Vesuvius has been famous ever since its eruption in 79 CE, when it destroyed and buried the Roman cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum. But less well-known is the role it played in the science and culture of early modern Italy, as Sean Cocco reveals in this ambitious and wide-ranging study. Humanists began to make pilgrimages to Vesuvius during the early Renaissance to experience its beauty and study its history, but a new tradition of observation emerged in 1631 with the first great eruption of the modern period. Seeking to understand the volcanoOCOs place in the larger system of nature, Neapolitans flocked to Vesuvius to examine volcanic phenomena and to collect floral and mineral specimens from the mountainside. aIn "Watching Vesuvius," Cocco argues that this investigation and engagement with Vesuvius was paramount to the development of modern volcanology. He then situates the native experience of Vesuvius in a larger intellectual, cultural, and political context and explains how later eighteenth-century representations of NaplesOCoof its climate and characterOCogrew out of this tradition of natural history. Painting a rich and detailed portrait of Vesuvius and those living in its shadow, Cocco returns the historic volcano to its place in a broader European culture of science, travel, and appreciation of the natural world.

Dancing Daisies

by Sara Pyszka

Brynn has cerebral palsy and her relationship with her two best friends is just shattered. Brynn is looking forward more than ever to her summer at Camp Lakewood.

The Dune's Twisted Edge: Journey in the Levant

by Gabriel Levin

"How to speak of the imaginative reach of a land habitually seen as a seedbed of faiths and heresies, confluences and ruptures . . . trouble spot and findspot, ruin and renewal, fault line and ragged clime, with a medley of people and languages once known with mingled affection and wariness as Levantine?" So begins poet Gabriel Levin in his journeys in the Levant, the exotic land that stands at the crossroads of western Asia, the eastern Mediterranean, and northeast Africa. Part travelogue, part field guide, and part literary appreciation, The Dune's Twisted Edge assembles six interlinked essays that explore the eastern seaboard of the Levant and its deserts, bringing to life this small but enigmatic part of the world. Striking out from his home in Jerusalem in search of a poetics of the Fertile Crescent, Levin probes the real and imaginative terrain of the Levant, a place that beckoned to him as a source of wonder and self-renewal. His footloose travels take him to the Jordan Valley; to Wadi Rumm south of Petra; to the semiarid Negev of modern-day Israel and its Bedouin villages; and, in his recounting of the origins of Arabic poetry, to the Empty Quarter of Arabia where the pre-Islamic poets once roamed. His meanderings lead to encounters with a host of literary presences: the wandering poet-prince Imru al-Qays, Byzantine empress Eudocia, British naturalist Henry Baker Tristram, Herman Melville making his way to the Dead Sea, and even New York avant-garde poet Frank O'Hara. When he is not confronting ghosts, Levin finds himself stumbling upon the traces of vanished civilizations. He discovers a ruined Umayyad palace on the outskirts of Jericho, the Greco-Roman hot springs near the Sea of Galilee, and Nabatean stick figures carved on stones in the sands of Jordan. Vividly evoking the landscape, cultures, and poetry of this ancient region, The Dune's Twisted Edge celebrates the contested ground of the Middle East as a place of compound myths and identities.

The M & F Solution

by The Editors at the Cengage Learning

A student textbook about marriage and family.

ScienceFusion, Module C: The Human Body (Interactive Worktext Grades 6-8,)

by The Editors at the Holt McDougal

This book with a student centred approach features: Learning science concepts and vocabulary Building inquiry, STEM, and 21st Century Skills Incorporating math and writing in each science lesson.

Gabriela, Clove and Cinnamon

by James L. Taylor William L. Grossman

Gabriela, a sensous free spirited woman migrates from famine to the city of Ilheus, where her story meshes with the city's story.

Germans into Nazis

by Peter Fritzsche

In this dramatically plotted book, organized around crucial turning points in 1914, 1918, and 1933, Peter Fritzsche explains why the Nazis were so popular and what was behind the political choice made by the German people.

Museums in Motion: An Introduction to the History and Functions of Museums (Second Edition)

by Edward P. Alexander Mary Alexander

This book presents the history of museums since the eighteenth century with a detailed examination of the function of museums and museum workers in modern society.

Folding Paper Cranes: An Atomic Memoir

by Leonard Bird

The author seeks to make peace with his past and with a future shadowed by nuclear proliferation.His paper cranes are the poetry and prose of this haunting memoir.

Kidnapped (Timeless Classics)

by Robert Louis Stevenson Janice Greene

On the run from his kidnapper, an orphaned boy acquires an unexpected travelling companion. Is Alan Breck the notorious outlaw that people say he is? Or is he really a patriotic hero? This is the Timeless Classics version adapted by Janice Greene.

Word Explorer: Developing a Rich Vocabulary (Level D)

by Peoples Education Staff

A workbook for improving student vocabulary.

Lifeworlds: Essays in Existential Anthropology

by Michael Jackson

Michael Jackson's Lifeworlds is a masterful collection of essays, the culmination of a career aimed at understanding the relationship between anthropology and philosophy. Seeking the truths that are found in the interstices between examiner and examined, world and word, and body and mind, and taking inspiration from James, Dewey, Arendt, Husserl, Sartre, Camus, and, especially, Merleau Ponty, Jackson creates in these chapters a distinctive anthropological pursuit of existential inquiry. More important, he buttresses this philosophical approach with committed empirical research. Traveling from the Kuranko in Sierra Leone to the Maori in New Zealand to the Warlpiri in Australia, Jackson argues that anthropological subjects continually negotiate imaginatively, practically, and politically their relations with the forces surrounding them and the resources they find in themselves or in solidarity with significant others. At the same time that they mirror facets of the larger world, they also help shape it. Stitching the themes, peoples, and locales of these essays into a sustained argument for a philosophical anthropology that focuses on the places between, Jackson offers a pragmatic understanding of how people act to make their lives more viable, to grasp the elusive, to counteract external powers, and to turn abstract possibilities into embodied truths.

Novel Science: Fiction and the Invention of Nineteenth-Century Geology

by Adelene Buckland

"Novel Science" is the first in-depth study of the shocking, groundbreaking, and sometimes beautiful writings of the gentlemen of the OC heroic ageOCO of geology and of the contribution these men made to the literary culture of their day. For these men, literature was an essential part of the practice of science itself, as important to their efforts as mapmaking, fieldwork, and observation. The reading and writing of imaginative literatures helped them to discover, imagine, debate, and give shape and meaning to millions of years of previously undiscovered earth history. aaaaaaaaaaaBorrowing from the historical fictions of Walter Scott and the poetry of Lord Byron, they invented geology as a science, discovered many of the creatures we now call the dinosaurs, and were the first to unravel and map the sequence and structure of stratified rock. As Adelene Buckland shows, they did this by rejecting the grand narratives of older theories of the earth or of biblical cosmogony: theirs would be a humble science, faithfully recording minute details and leaving the big picture for future generations to paint. Buckland also reveals how these scientistsOCojust as they had drawn inspiration from their literary predecessorsOCogave Victorian realist novelists such as George Eliot, Charles Kingsley, and Charles Dickens a powerful language with which to create dark and disturbing ruptures in the too-seductive sweep of story. "

Outlander (Outlander #1)

by Diana Gabaldon

Twenty years ago, the journey began: Diana Gabaldon swept readers into her mesmerizing world brimming with history, romance, and adventure. To celebrate the series that has captured the hearts of millions, Doubleday Canada will be publishing a special anniversary edition for core Gabaldon fans and new readers alike. Unrivaled storytelling, unforgettable characters, and rich historical detail are the hallmarks of Diana Gabaldon's novels. Here is the story that started it all, introducing two remarkable characters: Claire Randall and Jamie Fraser. A spellbinding novel of passion and history, that combines exhilarating adventure with a love story for the ages, The Outlander takes readers on an unforgettable journey.

Uncle Janice

by Matt Burgess

Twenty-four-year-old Janice Itwaru is an "uncle"--NYPD lingo for an undercover narcotics officer--and the heroine of the most exuberantand original cop novel in years.A New York City cop who can last eighteen months in Narcotics, without getting killed or demoted first, will automatically get promoted to detective. Undercover narc Janice Itwaru is at month seventeen. Ambitious, desperate for that promotion, she hits the sidewalks of Queens in her secondhand hoochie clothes, hoping to convince potential criminals--drug dealers, addicts, dummies, whomever--to commit a felony on her behalf. And things aren't any easier back at the narco office, where she has to keep up with the bantering lies and inventively cruel pranks of her fellow uncles while coping with the ridiculous demands of her NYPD bosses. With an ailing mother at home, her cover nearly blown, quota pressures from her superiors, and rumors circulating that Internal Affairs has her unit under surveillance, Janice is running terribly short on luck as her promotion deadline approaches. Now she has to decide which evil to confront: the absurd bureaucrats at One Police Plaza, or the violent drug dealers who may already be on to her identity. Bursting with the glorious chaos of the New York City streets, Uncle Janice is both a deeply funny portrait of how undercover cops really talk and act, and a compelling story of their crazy, dangerous, and complicated lives.From the Hardcover edition.

A Bad Character

by Deepti Kapoor

A highly charged fiction debut about a young woman in India, and the love that both shatters and transforms her She is twenty, restless in New Delhi. Her mother has died; her father has left for Singapore. He is a few years older, just back to India from New York.When they meet in a café one afternoon, she--lonely, hungry for experience, yearning to break free of tradition--casts aside her fears and throws herself headlong into a love affair, one that takes her where she has never been before. Told in a voice at once gritty and lyrical, mournful and frank, A Bad Character marks the arrival of an astonishingly gifted new writer. It is an unforgettable hymn to a dangerous, exhilarating city, and a portrait of desire and its consequences as timeless as it is universal.From the Hardcover edition.

Showing 2,901 through 2,925 of 8,663 results


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