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Degradation

by Kevin W. Saunders

Throughout history obscenity has not really been about sex but about degradation. Sexual depictions have been suppressed when they were seen as lowering the status of humans, furthering our distance from the gods or God and moving us toward the animals. In the current era, when we recognize ourselves and both humans and animals, sexual depiction has lost some of its sting. Its degrading role has been replaced by hate speech that distances groups, whether based on race, ethnicity, gender, or sexual orientation, not only from God but from humanity to a subhuman level. In this original study of the relationship between obscenity and hate speech, First Amendment specialist Kevin W. Saunders traces the legal trajectory of degradation as it moved from sexual depiction to hateful speech. Looking closely at hate speech in several arenas, including racist, homophobic, and sexist speech in the workplace, classroom, and other real-life scenarios, Saunders posits that if hate speech is today's conceptual equivalent of obscenity, then the body of law that dictated obscenity might shed some much-needed light on what may or may not qualify as punishable hate speech.

When Governments Break the Law

by Austin Sarat Nasser Hussain

Recent controversies surrounding the war on terror and American intervention in Iraq and Afghanistan have brought rule of law rhetoric to a fevered pitch. While President Obama has repeatedly emphasized his Administration's commitment to transparency and the rule of law, nowhere has this resolve been so quickly and severely tested than with the issue of the possible prosecution of Bush Administration officials. While some worry that without legal consequences there will be no effective deterrence for the repetition of future transgressions of justice committed at the highest levels of government, others echo Obama's seemingly reluctant stance on launching an investigation into allegations of criminal wrongdoing by former President Bush, Vice President Cheney, Secretary Rumsfeld, and members of the Office of Legal Counsel. Indeed, even some of the Bush Administration's harshest critics suggest that we should avoid such confrontations, that the price of political division is too high. Measured or partisan, scholarly or journalistic, clearly the debate about accountability for the alleged crimes of the Bush Administration will continue for some time.Using this debate as its jumping off point, When Governments Break the Law takes an interdisciplinary approach to the legal challenges posed by the criminal wrongdoing of governments. But this book is not an indictment of the Bush Administration; rather, the contributors take distinct positions for and against the proposition, offering revealing reasons and illuminating alternatives. The contributors do not ask the substantive question of whether any Bush Administration officials, in fact, violated the law, but rather the procedural, legal, political, and cultural questions of what it would mean either to pursue criminal prosecutions or to refuse to do so. By presuming that officials could be prosecuted, these essays address whether they should.When Governments Break the Law provides a valuable and timely commentary on what is likely to be an ongoing process of understanding the relationship between politics and the rule of law in times of crisis.Contributors: Claire Finkelstein, Lisa Hajjar, Daniel Herwitz, Stephen Holmes, Paul Horwitz, Nasser Hussain, Austin Sarat, and Stephen I. Vladeck.

A Troubled Range

by Andrew Grey

Stories from the Range: Book TwoThe neighboring Holden and Jessup ranches are anything but neighborly--Jefferson Holden and Kent Jessup loathe each other. But despite his father's long-held grudge, Haven Jessup just can't bring himself to hate, especially after Dakota Holden takes him in during a violent storm and Haven meets Dakota's friend, Phillip Reardon. Phillip accepts Haven for who he is, seeing through the mask Haven uses to hide his attraction to men, but their tentative and secret relationship will be under a huge amount of stress. Sabotaged fences, injured animals, unsavory plans, and Jessup family secrets will threaten Haven's newfound happiness and his hopes of a future with Phillip.

Bless Us With Content

by Tinnean

Ashton Laytham came to Fayerweather, his uncle's estate, as an orphan at the age of seven. Family and servants alike perceived Ashton as an unlovable child and shunned him; as an adult, the occasional illicit rendezvous aside, Ashton remains aloof and alone. When his uncle dies, yet more abuse falls upon Ashton's shoulders: the estate is bankrupt and Ashton must make good on his uncle's gaming debts. With the family talisman stolen and the suspects fled, Ashton faces certain ruin until the arrival of Geo Stephenson, who holds all of Sir Laytham's IOUs. Geo proposes a solution: Ashton will accommodate him in his bed, thereby paying off the debt. Attracted to Geo in spite of himself and desperate for any human kindness, Ashton agrees... never expecting to lose his heart to a man who claims he will never give his.

Making Promises

by Amy Lane

Keeping Promise Rock: Book TwoAll Shane Perkins ever wanted to be was a hero. But after a career-shattering decision to go down fighting, Shane comes home from the hospital to four empty walls, a pile of money, and a burning desire for someone to miss him the next time he gets hurt in the line of duty. He ends up an officer in the small town of Levee Oaks, and, addicted to the promise of family, he makes an effort to reconcile with his flighty, troubled sister. Kimmy makes her living as a dancer, and her partner steals Shane's breath at first sight. Mikhail Vasilyovitch Bayul dances like an angel, but his past is less than heavenly. Since he left Russia, he's made only two promises: to stay off the streets and stay clean, and to take his mother someplace beautiful before she dies. Making promises to anybody else is completely out of the question--but then, Mikhail has never met anybody like Shane. Earnest, brave, and self-deprecating, Shane seems to speak Mikhail's language, and no one is more surprised than Mikhail to find that keeping promises is Shane's best talent of all.

Warrior's Cross

by Madeleine Urban Abigail Roux

Cameron Jacobs is an open book. He considers himself a common waiter with normal friends, boring hobbies, harmless dogs, and nothing even resembling a secret... except a crush on a tall, dark, devastatingly handsome man who dines alone at his restaurant on Tuesday nights. All it takes is one passionate night with Julian Cross to turn Cameron's world on its head. Julian's love and devotion are all Cameron could have hoped for and more. But when his ordinary life meets and clashes with Julian's extraordinary lifestyle, Cameron discovers that trust and fear can go hand in hand, and love is just a step away from danger. ...a wonderful edge of your seat book. 5 or 5 Divas Jen @ Dark Diva Reviews ...a suspenseful and slow-paced story with plenty of drama. The romance is breathtaking, and the action and suspense are intense. Nannette @ Joyfully Reviewed The authors' narrative is comfortable and flows smoothly, their plotting is tight, and their characters are well-developed and interesting...My only true disappointment in this book? That I've finished reading it. It was a little bit like a slice of birthday cake: beautiful to look at, satisfying to consume, and then mourned when it's gone. 5 of 5 stars Bobby @ Bookwenches The strong characters and narrative carry the story and the enjoyable action plot make this a fun, entertaining read with a good romance. The actions scenes are interesting and engaging with good writing and a dash of wit and humor thrown in to keep the story from being too dark and tense. 4.5 of 5 cherries Cactus @ Whipped Cream Reviews

Educating the Whole Child for the Whole World

by Marcelo M. Suarez-Orozco Carolyn Sattin-Bajaj

At the dawn of the twenty-first century, we are living in a global era, yet schooling systems remain generally reactive and slow to adapt to shifting economic, technological, demographic, and cultural terrains. There is a growing urgency to create, evaluate, and expand new models of education that are better synchronized with the realities of today's globally linked economies and societies.Educating the Whole Child for the Whole World examines one such model: the ethos and practices of the Ross Schools and their incubation, promotion, and launching of new ideas and practices into public education. Over the last two decades Ross has come to articulate a systematic approach to education consciously tailored for a new era of global interdependence.In this volume, world-renowned scholars from a variety of disciplines, as well as veteran teachers, administrators, and students, come together to examine some of the best practices in K-12 education in the context of an increasingly interconnected world. Together they explore how the Ross model of education, which cultivates in students a global perspective, aligns with broader trends in the arts, humanities, and sciences in the new millennium.Contributors: Nick Appelbaum, Ralph Abraham, Antonio M. Battro, Sally Booth, Michele Clays, Elizabeth M. Daley, Antonio Damasio, Hanna Damasio, Kurt W. Fischer, Howard Gardner, Vartan Gregorian, Christina Hinton, Hideaki Koizumi, Debra McCall, Carolyn Sattin-Bajaj, John Sexton, Carola Suárez-Orozco, Marcelo M. Suárez-Orozco, William Irwin Thompson, and Sherry Turkle.

Faith and War

by David E. Settje

Throughout American history, Christianity has shaped public opinion, guided leaders in their decision making, and stood at the center of countless issues. To gain complete knowledge of an era, historians must investigate the religious context of what transpired, why it happened, and how. Yet too little is known about American Christianity's foreign policy opinions during the Cold and Vietnam Wars. To gain a deeper understanding of this period (1964-75), David E. Settje explores the diversity of American Christian responses to the Cold and Vietnam Wars to determine how Americans engaged in debates about foreign policy based on their theological convictions. Settje uncovers how specific Christian theologies and histories influenced American religious responses to international affairs, which varied considerably. Scrutinizing such sources as the evangelical Christianity Today, the mainline Protestant ,Christian Century, a sampling of Catholic periodicals, the African Methodist Episcopal Church, the Southern Baptist Convention, and the United Church of Christ, Faith and War explores these entities' commingling of religion, politics, and foreign policy, illuminating the roles that Christianity attempted to play in both reflecting and shaping American foreign policy opinions during a decade in which global matters affected Americans daily and profoundly.

Bodies of Reform

by James B. Salazar

From the patricians of the early republic to post-Reconstruction racial scientists, from fin de siècle progressivist social reformers to post-war sociologists, character, that curiously formable yet equally formidable "stuff," has had a long and checkered history giving shape to the American national identity.Bodies of Reform reconceives this pivotal category of nineteenth-century literature and culture by charting the development of the concept of "character" in the fictional genres, social reform movements, and political cultures of the United States from the mid-nineteenth to the early-twentieth century. By reading novelists such as Herman Melville, Mark Twain, Pauline Hopkins, and Charlotte Perkins Gilman alongside a diverse collection of texts concerned with the mission of building character, including child-rearing guides, muscle-building magazines, libel and naturalization law, Scout handbooks, and success manuals, James B. Salazar uncovers how the cultural practices of representing character operated in tandem with the character-building strategies of social reformers. His innovative reading of this archive offers a radical revision of this defining category in U.S. literature and culture, arguing that character was the keystone of a cultural politics of embodiment, a politics that played a critical role in determining-and contesting-the social mobility, political authority, and cultural meaning of the raced and gendered body.

The Captain’s Widow of Sandwich

by Megan Taylor Shockley

In 1852 Hannah Rebecca Crowell married sea captain William Burgess and set sail. Within three years, Rebecca Burgess had crossed the equator eleven times and learned to navigate a vessel. In 1856, 22-year-old Rebecca saved the ship Challenger as her husband lay dying from dysentery. The widow returned to her family's home in Sandwich, Massachusetts, where she refused all marriage proposals and died wealthy in 1917.This is the way Burgess recorded her story in her prodigious journals and registers, which she donated to the local historical society upon her death, but there is no other evidence that this dramatic event occurred exactly this way. In The Captain's Widow of Sandwich, Megan Taylor Shockley examines how Burgess constructed her own legend and how the town of Sandwich embraced that history as its own. Through careful analysis of myriad primary sources, Shockley also addresses how Burgess dealt with the conflicting gender roles of her life, reconciling her traditionally masculine adventures at sea and her independent lifestyle with the accepted ideals of the period's "Victorian woman."

Meeting the Enemy

by Natsu Taylor Saito

Since its founding, the United States has defined itself as the supreme protector of freedom throughout the world, pointing to its Constitution as the model of law to ensure democracy at home and to protect human rights internationally. Although the United States has consistently emphasized the importance of the international legal system, it has simultaneously distanced itself from many established principles of international law and the institutions that implement them. In fact, the American government has attempted to unilaterally reshape certain doctrines of international law while disregarding others, such as provisions of the Geneva Conventions and the prohibition on torture.America's selective self-exemption, Natsu Taylor Saito argues, undermines not only specific legal institutions and norms, but leads to a decreased effectiveness of the global rule of law. Meeting the Enemy is a pointed look at why the United States' frequent--if selective--disregard of international law and institutions is met with such high levels of approval, or at least complacency, by the American public.

Prophetic Activism

by Helene Slessarev-Jamir

While the links between conservative Christians and politics have been drawn strongly in recent years, coming to embody what many think of as religious activism, the profoundly religious nature of community organizing and other more left-leaning justice work has been largely overlooked. Prophetic Activism is the first broad comparative examination of progressive religious activism in the United States. Set up as a counter-narrative to religious conservatism, the book offers readers a deeper understanding of the richness and diversity of contemporary religious activism.Helene Slessarev-Jamir offers five case studies of major progressive religious justice movements that have their roots in liberative interpretations of Scripture: congregational community organizing; worker justice; immigrant rights work; peace-making and reconciliation; and global anti-poverty and debt relief. Drawing on intensive interviews with activists at all levels of this work--from pastors and congregational leaders to local organizers and the executive directors of the national networks--she uncovers the ways in which they construct an ethical framework for their work. In addition to looking at predominantly Christian organizations, the book also highlights the growth of progressive activism among Jews, Muslims, and Buddhists who are engaged in reinterpreting their religious texts to support new forms of activism. Religion and Social Transformation series

Pimps Up, Ho's Down

by T. Denean Sharpley-Whiting

2007 Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association Emily Toth AwardPimps Up, Ho's Down pulls at the threads of the intricately knotted issues surrounding young black women and hip hop culture. What unravels for Tracy D. Sharpley-Whiting is a new, and problematic, politics of gender. In this fascinating and forceful book, Sharpley-Whiting, a feminist writer who is a member of the hip hop generation, interrogates the complexities of young black women's engagement with a culture that is masculinist, misogynistic, and frequently mystifying.Beyond their portrayal in rap lyrics, the display of black women in music videos, television, film, fashion, and on the Internet is indispensable to the mass media engineered appeal of hip hop culture, the author argues. And the commercial trafficking in the images and behaviors associated with hip hop has made them appear normal, acceptable, and entertaining - both in the U.S. and around the world.Sharpley-Whiting questions the impacts of hip hop's increasing alliance with the sex industry, the rise of groupie culture in the hip hop world, the impact of hip hop's compulsory heterosexual culture on young black women, and the permeation of the hip hop ethos into young black women's conceptions of love and romance. The author knows her subject from the inside. Coming of age in the midst of hip hop's evolution in the late 1980s, she mixed her graduate studies with work as a runway and print model in the 1990s. Her book features interviews with exotic dancers, black hip hop groupies, and hip hop generation members Jacklyn "Diva" Bush, rapper Trina, and filmmaker Aishah Simmons, along with the voices of many "everyday" young women.Pimps Up, Ho's Down turns down the volume and amplifies the substance of discussions about hip hop culture and to provide a space for young black women to be heard.

Fight Like a Girl

by Megan Seely

View the Author's website! Seely, the youngest elected president of California's chapter of the National Organization for Women, combines her own story of third-wave feminism with an overview of the feminist movement and words to guide others. Third-wave feminists are aware of both the victories won by earlier feminists and the problems of class, race, sexual orientation, and internationalism that must still be overcome. This book weaves a deep respect for the foremothers with commonsense discussion of current obstacles and suggestions for direct action, resulting in a work that reminds us of what too many activists forget-every progressive movement has a long history, few organizing tricks are new, and problems must be understood before they can be solved. Seely includes booklists, time lines, web sites, and how-to tips that will help readers over the bridge from her insights to real world activism. For midsize to larger public libraries, academic libraries, and all feminist collections.--Library Journal"Want to know what it means to be a feminist of the third wave? Megan Seely's Fight Like a Girl is the answer; there's enough information here to make you angry and enough resources to make you an effective activist.--Jennifer Baumgardner and Amy Richards, co-authors of Manifesta: Young Women, Feminism and the Future "Always engaging, interesting, and insightful. Fascinating and sure to engage many young women!" --Sherrie A. Inness, editor of Action Chicks "The resources, helpful hints about organizing and working with the press, the short bios of companies and fabulous feminists are great!" -Caryn Aviv, co-editor of American Queer, Then and Now Fight Like a Girl is packed with both information and inspiration for young women by a young woman who knows her stuff. It's a terrific practical feminist resource book with an optimistic attitude that says in clear language, "You're in charge of your life and here's how to stay that way". -Gloria Feldt, former president, Planned Parenthood Federation of America and author of The War on Choice: The Right-Wing Attack on Women's Rights and How to Fight Back Fight Like a Girl offers a fearless vision for the future of feminism. By boldly detailing what is at stake for women and girls today, Megan Seely outlines the necessary steps to achieve true political, social and economic equity for all. Reclaiming feminism for a new generation, Fight Like a Girl speaks to young women who embrace feminism in substance but not necessarily in name. With an eye toward what it takes to create actual change, Seely offers a practical guide for how to get involved, take action and wage successful events and campaigns. The book is full of valuable resources for novice and committed activists alike, including such features as "How to Write a Press Release," "Guidelines to a Good Media Interview," "A Feminist Shopping Guide," and a list of over 100 Fabulous Feminist Resources, including organizations, websites, and events to attend. Each chapter is full of ideas, both big and small, for ways to get involved, get active, and make a difference. Exploring such issues as body image and self-acceptance, education and empowerment, health and sexuality, political representation, economic justice, and violence against women, Fight Like a Girl looks at the challenges that women and girls face while emphasizing the strength that they independently, and collectively, embody. Seely delves into the politics of the feminist movement, exploring both women's history and current-day realities with easy-to-follow lists and timelines like those on "Women Who Made a Difference," "Chronology of the U.S. Women's Movement," and "Do's and Don'ts for Young Feminists." A Third Wave manifesto as well as an introduction to feminism for a new generation, Fight Like A Girl is a powerful blueprint for young women today.

Fraternity Gang Rape

by Peggy Reeves Sanday

This widely acclaimed and meticulously documented volume illustrates, in painstaking and disturbing detail, the nature of fraternity gang rape. Drawing on interviews with both victims and fraternity members, Peggy Reeves Sanday reconstructs daily life in the fraternity, highlighting the role played by pornography, male bonding, and degrading, often grotesque, initiation and hazing rituals.In a substantial new introduction and afterword, Sanday updates the incidences of fraternity gang rape on college campuses today, highlighting such recent cases as that of Duke University and others in the headlines. Sanday also explores the nature of hazing at sororities on campus and how Greek life in general contributes to a culture which promotes the exploitation and sexual degradation of women on campus. More broadly, Sanday examines the nature of campus life today and the possibility of creating a rape-free campus culture.

Youth, Globalization, and the Law

by Ronald Kassimir Sudhir Venkatesh

This book addresses the impact of globalization on the lives of youth, focusing on the role of legal institutions and discourses. As practices and ideas travel the globe--such as the promotion and transmission of zero tolerance and retributive justice programs, the near ubiquitous acceptance of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, and the transnational migration of street gangs--the legal arena is being transformed. The essays in this book offer case studies and in-depth analyses, spanning diverse settings including courts and prisons, inner-city streets, international human rights initiatives, newspaper offices, local youth organizations, and the United Nations. Drawing on everyday social practices, each chapter adds clarity to our current understanding of the ways in which ideas and practices in different parts of the world can affect youth in one particular locale.

Desire and Distance: Introduction to a Phenomenology of Perception

by Paul Milan Renaud Barbaras

Desire and Distance constitutes an important new departure in contemporary phenomenological thought, a rethinking and critique of basic philosophical positions concerning the concept of perception presented by Husserl and Merleau-Ponty, though it departs in significant and original ways from their work. Barbaras's overall goal is to develop a philosophy of what "life" is--one that would do justice to the question of embodiment and its role in perception and the formation of the human subject. Barbaras posits that desire and distance inform the concept of "life." Levinas identified a similar structure in Descartes's notion of the infinite. For Barbaras, desire and distance are anchored not in meaning, but in a rethinking of the philosophy of biology and, in consequence, cosmology. Barbaras elaborates and extends the formal structure of desire and distance by drawing on motifs as yet unexplored in the French phenomenological tradition, especially the notions of "life" and the "life-world," which are prominent in the later Husserl but also appear in non-phenomenological thinkers such as Bergson. Barbaras then filters these notions (especially "life") through Merleau-Ponty.

The Kurillian Knot: A History of Japanese-Russian Border Negotiations

by Mark Ealey Hiroshi Kimura

This book provides an answer to the mystery of why no peace treaty has yet been signed between Japan and Russia after more than sixty years since the end of World War Two. The author, a leading authority on Japanese-Russian diplomatic history, was trained at the Russian Institute of Columbia University. This volume contributes to our understanding of not only the intricacies of bilateral relations between Moscow and Tokyo, but, more generally, of Russia's and Japan's modes of foreign policy formation. The author also discusses the U.S. factor, which helped make Russia and Japan distant neighbors, and the threat from China, which might help these countries come closer in the near future. It would be hardly possible to discuss the future prospects of Northeast Asia without having first read this book.

Strangers in the City: Reconfigurations of Space, Power, and Social Networks Within China’s Floating Population

by Li Zhang

With rapid commercialization, a booming urban economy, and the relaxation of state migration policies, over 100 million peasants, known as China's "floating population," have streamed into large cities seeking employment and a better life. This massive flow of rural migrants directly challenges Chinese socialist modes of state control. This book traces the profound transformations of space, power relations, and social networks within a mobile population that has broken through the constraints of the government's household registration system. The author explores this important social change through a detailed ethnographic account of the construction, destruction, and eventual reconstruction of the largest migrant community in Beijing. She focuses on the informal privatization of space and power in this community through analyzing the ways migrant leaders build their power base by controlling housing and market spaces and mobilizing social networks. The author argues that to gain a deeper understanding of recent Chinese social and political transformations, one must examine not only to what extent state power still dominates everyday social life, but also how the aims and methods of late socialist governance change under new social and economic conditions. In revealing the complexities and uncertainties of the shifting power and social relations in post-Mao China, this book challenges the common notion that sees recent changes as an inevitable move toward liberal capitalism and democracy.

Sinister Strawberry Waffle: Book 3 in the Diner of the Dead Series

by Carolyn Q. Hunter

SUMMER PRESCOTT BOOKS is thrilled to announce the release of the long-awaited 3rd book in The Diner of the Dead Series: Sinister Strawberry Waffle, by Carolyn Q. Hunter!!! Just when it seems that things have finally quieted down for diner owner Sonja Reed, a threatening note, which is slipped under her door, spurs a series of spine-tingling events. When a simple landscaping project goes terribly awry, and a local businessman is murdered, Sonja finds herself in the midst of her most perplexing and dangerous mystery yet.

Brigid Beware! (Brigid Thrush #2)

by Kathleen Leverich

Brigid is dying for a pair of "glass slippers" so she can look like all the other girls at school. But when her eight-year-old fairy godmother, Maribel, grants Brigid's wish, she also makes some of Brigid's other clothing disappear! Once again, Brigid is fed up with Maribel--until she learns an important lesson about fads. Pictures are described. Don't miss the first Brigid Thrush book, Brigid Bewitched, and the third book, Brigid the Bad, which are in the Bookshare library along with other fun books by Kathleen Leverich.

The Matter of the Vanishing Greyhound: Golden Gate Bridge Disappearing Greyhound Bus Caper

by Levi Steve

How can a Greyhound Bus with four bank robbers, $10 million in cash, the contents of all of the safety deposit boxes and 12 hostages being follow by the San Francisco Police vanish off the Golden Gate Bridge? The police are stumped so a specialist in impossible crimes, Captain Heinz Noonan, the Bearded Holmes, is sent to San Francisco to solve the crime. With the clock ticking, Noonan will have to unravel how the bus was able to disappear - and why there are still hostages if the money has already been stolen and the bank robbers have vanished. Ride along with Captain Heinz Noonan, the nation's foremost impossible crime sleuth, and see if you can solve the crime as fast as he does!

Cognizanti: An annual journal produced by Cognizant | VOLUME 9 ISSUE 1 2016

by Matthew Smith Reshma Trenchil Alan Alper Gary Beach Anand Chandramouli Bruce J. Rogow Stan Iyer Rajaram Radhakrishnan Mary Murphy-Hoye Prasad Satyavolu David Delano Rob Ao2 Ted Shelton Rob Asen Asen Burkhard Blechschmidt Jagan Ramachandran Manish Bahl Dharmesh Mistry

Progress on the Path to Digital Authenticity This edition of Cognizanti explores the essence of what it means to be digital (think of a digital-to-the-core attitude and customer autonomy as critical operating constructs) and amplifies the role that the thoroughly modern CIO can play in helping organizations achieve progress, both from a leadership and "gig" economy point of view. From there, we examine the evolving world of intel-ligent automation (systems that do, think, learn and adapt), as well as the emerging landscape of business platforms, where companies of all sizes and shapes can plug and play in ecosystems that they either own, manage or merely participate in. This new approach introduces an interesting variation on the "co-opetition" theme that has pervaded business for the past few decades.

Life and Correspondence of Field Marshal Sir John Burgoyne, Bart. — Vol. I

by George Wrottesley R.E. Field Marshal Sir John Burgoyne Bart.

This ebook is purpose built and is proof-read and re-type set from the original to provide an outstanding experience of reflowing text for an ebook reader. Sir John Fox Burgoyne, illegitimate child of General John Burgoyne, started life with few prospects of greatness but ended his life as a hugely respected Field Marshal of the British army; his funeral in 1871 was attended by no less than "Her Majesty the Queen, H.R.H. the Prince of Wales, H.R.H. the Duke of Edinburgh, H.R.H. Prince Arthur, His Majesty the King of the Belgians... Among the British Officers assembled, were two Field-Marshals, ten full Generals, of whom seven wore the insignia of Grand Cross of the Bath, three Lieut.-Generals, fifteen Major-Generals, including Prince Edward of Saxe Weimar..." Destined for a military career from birth, he was commissioned into the Royal Engineers on 29th August 1798. At the time the Royal Engineers were a small body of men with specialized knowledge, primarily commissioned officers with few enlisted men - even a new Lieutenant was a person of consequence due to his rarity and skills, and the paucity of advancement that relied purely on seniority of service. He did not have to wait long before being flung into action during the blockade of Malta and then the invasion of Denmark. However, the majority of this book consists of letters and journal entries of his experiences during the Peninsular War. As one of the few engineers with the Duke's army, he was given important assignments during the sieges that dominated the movements of the Allied forces; his notes are all the more important for their commentary of the siege operations such as Badajoz and Ciudad Rodrigo that were undertaken from his expert knowledge. Notwithstanding the high casualty rates amongst the Engineers, Sir John survived the War to be employed on the disastrous expedition to New Orleans in 1814. His post-Napoleonic career was stunted by lack of potential advancement, so much so that he became involved in civil engineering and work on fortifications. He was posted to Ireland where he endeavoured to improve the conditions of the poor, particularly straining all his influence during the disastrous potato famine. Whilst doing this he was also a frequent correspondent with the military establishment over improvements and clashed with the indifference of politicians and their budgets. The first volume ends with the beginnings of the tension with Russia and his coming employment in the Crimea. Title - Life and Correspondence of Field Marshal Sir John Burgoyne, Bart. -- Vol. I Series Name - Life and Correspondence of Field Marshal Sir John Burgoyne, Bart. Series Number -- I Author -- Field Marshal Sir John Burgoyne, Bart.(1782-1871) Editor -- Lieut.-Colonel the Hon. George Wrottesley (R.E.) (1827-1909) Text taken, whole and complete, from the edition published in 1873, London, by Richard Bentley. Original - 506 pages. Illustrations - one portrait.

In a Yellow Wood

by Gore Vidal

Master storyteller Gore Vidal's 1947 classic.Robert Holton has returned from Europe and settled into a solitary existence working for a New York stockbroker. He suppresses memories of nights of love in Florence as he tries to succeed in the city, but when Carla turns up he has to choose between conventionality and the fraught path of love.

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