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Showing 3,076 through 3,100 of 7,622 results

The Story of Alice

by Robert Douglas-Fairhurst

Robert Douglas-Fairhurst illuminates two entangled lives: the Oxford mathematician Charles Dodgson (Lewis Carroll) and Alice Liddell, the child for whom he invented the Alice stories. This relationship influenced Carroll's imaginative creation of Wonderland--a sheltered world apart during the stormy transition from the Victorian to the modern era.

Entrepreneurial Litigation

by John C. Coffee

In class actions, attorneys effectively hire clients rather than act as their agent. Lawyer-financed, lawyer-controlled, and lawyer-settled, this entrepreneurial litigation invites lawyers to act in their own interest. John Coffee's goal is to save class action, not discard it, and to make private enforcement of law more democratically accountable.

Noise Matters

by R. Haven Wiley

We think of noise as background sound that interferes with our ability to hear more interesting sounds. But noise is anything that interferes with the reception of signals of any sort. Whatever its cause, the consequence of noise is error by receivers, and these errors are the key to understanding how noise shapes the evolution of communication.

Touché

by John Leigh

Many of the West's best writers fought in duels or wrote about them, seduced by glamour or risk or recklessness. A gift as a plot device, the duel also offered a way to discover how we face fears of humiliation, pain, and death. John Leigh's literary history of the duel illuminates these and other tensions attending the birth of the modern world.

Homesickness

by Carlos Rojas

Carlos Rojas focuses on the trope of "homesickness" in China--discomfort caused not by a longing for home but by excessive proximity to it. This inverse homesickness marks a process of movement away from the home, conceived of as spaces associated with the nation, family, and individual body, and gives rise to the possibility of long-term health.

Tragic Modernities

by Miriam Leonard

Under the microscope of recent scholarship the universality of Greek tragedy has started to fade, as particularities of Athenian culture have come into focus. Miriam Leonard contests the idea of the death of tragedy and argues powerfully for the continued vitality and viability of Greek tragic theater in the central debates of contemporary culture.

Muslim Cosmopolitanism in the Age of Empire

by Seema Alavi

Seema Alavi challenges the idea that all pan-Islamic configurations are anti-Western or pro-Caliphate. A pan-Islamic intellectual network at the cusp of the British and Ottoman empires became the basis of a global Muslim sensibility--a political and cultural affiliation that competes with ideas of nationhood today as it did in the last century.

Kelvin McCloud and the Seaside Storm

by Michael Erb

An anonymous note in the middle of the night, an obituary for a banker who died in a hailstorm, and a mysterious woman vanishing down the stairwell: these clues lead Henry Alabaster and his uncle Kelvin McCloud to a spooky mansion in a coastal town. As a weather detective, Kelvin knows a thing or two about hailstorms, and then strange events surrounding the banker's death suggest foul play. Henry teams up with the fiery, artistic Rachel to help his uncle investigate, and they learn a lot about weather on the way. Nothing--not a thunderstorm, threats, burglary, a baseball bat-wielding suspect, nor even a devastating fire--can keep Henry and his team from chasing down the truth.

The Confounding Case of Climate Crisis

by Owen R. Liu Barbara Tinker

With time travel and mysteries that need solving, the Galactic Academy of Science (G.A.S.) series instructs readers on how to think like scientists. Under the guidance of a Dude or Dudette from the future, the middle school characters are faced with treacherous, present-day crimes that require a historical knowledge of science in order to be solved. From investigating problems to analyzing data and constructing explanations and solutions, this series blends elements of sci-fi with educational methods that distill the key thinking habits of scientists and engineers. An adventure that investigates the causes and consequences of climate change Something strange is going on during Anita and Benson's field trip to a greenhouse as their guide is making wild claims about carbon dioxide and their science teacher, Mr. Fazmel, has mysteriously disappeared. That's when Quarkum Phonon, a Dude from the future, sends Anita and Benson on a Galactic Academy of Science mission to learn about the origins of climate change and the ways communities around the world are dealing with its impact. With stops around the world--from a Hawaiian volcano to Greenland and Geneva--Anita and Benson sift through the evidence for climate change. On their return home, the students face the question: what can a couple of kids do to reduce CO2 emissions and slow down climate change? A portion of all profits from this book will go to support local projects helping people in the developing world adapt to climate change.

The Walking Fish

by Rachelle Burk Kopel Burk

A humorous, exciting tale of an ordinary girl who makes an extraordinary scientific discovery--a blind fish that walksWhen seventh-grader Alexis catches an unusual fish that looks like a living fossil, she sets off a frenzied scientific hunt for more of its kind. Alexis and her friend Darshan join the hunt, snorkeling, sounding the depths of Glacial Lake, even observing from a helicopter and exploring a cave. All the while, they fight to keep the selfish Dr. Mertz from claiming the discovery all for himself. When Alexis follows one final hunch, she risks her life and almost loses her friend. Walking Fish is a scientific adventure that provides a perfect combination of literacy and science.

The Baffling Case of Battered Brain

by Pendred Noyce

With time travel and mysteries that need solving, the Galactic Academy of Science (G.A.S.) series instructs readers on how to think like scientists. Under the guidance of a Dude or Dudette from the future, the middle school characters are faced with treacherous, present-day crimes that require a historical knowledge of science in order to be solved. From investigating problems to analyzing data and constructing explanations and solutions, this series blends elements of sci-fi with educational methods that distill the key thinking habits of scientists and engineers. Medical science combines with mystery in this G.A.S. adventure about concussions Is the awkward stranger taking bribes to throw games? When Clinton hits his head in the championship soccer game, the stranger gets him benched, and Clinton's team loses. Determined to nail the bribe-taker, Clinton and Mae take on a new G.A.S. mission--a journey across three continents and 4,000 years to learn about concussion and the brain.

Parrot Parrot

by Cammie Ho

Step inside the lives of parrots as they hatch from their eggs. Read with rhythm, and follow the lives of young parrots as they grow to become big and beautiful.

Butterfly Butterfly

by Cammie Ho

Explore the wonders of caterpillars as they hatch from eggs and transform into beautiful butterflies through stunning photos.

Tadpole Tadpole

by Cammie Ho

Explore the wonders of tadpoles as they hatch from eggs and discover their fascinating transformation into grown frogs through stunning pictures.

Duckling Duckling

by Cammie Ho

Follow the lives of cute little ducklings as they hatch from eggs and grow to become big ducks through amazing photos.

Chaos Theories

by Elizabeth Hazen

The poems in this debut collection spring from a unique collision of science and art in one poet's heart and mind. In these often elegiac poems, Hazen explores many forms of love -- between children, parents, siblings, friends, and lovers. In powerful poetic language and structure, loss is explored, and survival becomes another form of understanding, a way of seeing ourselves and others not as guilty or innocent, good or bad, but as complex, sometimes thwarted beings who are always striving for more wisdom, more empathy, more light. Hazen's language is elegant, her point of view unflinching, her voice mature and warm. Science in these poems is both information and consolation, a way of untangling chaos, of seeing more clearly and cleanly. Hazen is a poet who understands that we are all searching in various ways to make order of our lives and loves, and who crafts poems that can aid us in that search.

The Richard Peabody Reader

by Michael Dirda Richard Peabody Lucinda Ebersole

Filling an important gap in the literary world, The Richard Peabody Reader is a wide-ranging selection of this great writer's poetry and prose. As a publisher, Peabody's steadfast dedication to that which is new, challenging, innovative, and dynamic has won him a wide reputation among writers whose work he has championed. This volume demonstrates those same values, embodied in nearly four decades of fiercely smart, sophisticated, and often very funny writing. From his first collection of poems, I'm in Love with the Morton Salt Girl, to his most recent collection of short stories, Blue Suburban Skies, Peabody has established and developed a thoroughly unique voice, both warm and piercing, to deliver content that ranges from the hilarious, as in the short story "Flea Wars," to the bittersweet, as in the poem "The Other Man is Always French," to the elegiac, as in the poem in "Civil War Pieta," to the absurd, as in the rollicking farce of the short story, "Bad Day at Ikea." Peabody's aesthetic is all-embracing--strands of punk, beat, experimental, feminist, and political protest literary influences blend with the purely romantic to create a body of work that is both profound and pleasing.

Pagan Kennedy's Living: A Handbook for Maturing Hipsters

by Pagan Kennedy

Pagan Kennedy first captured the hearts of America with her personal zine Pagan's Head. Drawing from this source, she presents not only the zine-world standards, but also includes some helpful dating tips, such as "Pretend to go to the bathroom and never come back." Cruise through this book only if you want an extremely entertaining read and the opportunity to develop an unhealthy fixation on the fabulous Ms. Kennedy. Originally published in 1997, this new edition features "Where are they now" updates.

American Fallout

by Brandon Wicks

For Avery Cullins--library archivist, former teenage runaway, and gay man from a small Southern town--"family" means a live-in boyfriend and a surly turtle. But when his father, a renowned nuclear physicist, commits suicide, Avery's decade-long estrangement from his mother, now hobbled following a stroke, comes to a skidding halt. With his boyfriend's help, Avery takes custody of his mother and the trio heads cross country in a rented U-Haul, back to an apartment in Cleveland and an uncertain future. Their journey soon becomes a pilgrimage into the past when Avery begins sifting through his mother's mementos. What emerges is a story of family, love, and loss as his parents made a home, lost a child, and tested the boundaries of marital love in the 1970s. Meanwhile, in today's uncertain social landscape, Avery must confront his own struggle with a mother who doesn't recognize him and a lover who seeks to claim him for his own.

Bystanders

by Tara Laskowski

Legacies of violence and tragedy haunt these thirteen stunning stories from Tara Laskowski, author of Modern Manners for Your Inner Demons. A woman becomes obsessed with her co-worker's murderer; an investigative reporter with a nose for scandal finds his own life suddenly unraveling; eerie sights in a video baby monitor haunt a new mother. When the unexpected happens, these bystanders--who are not always innocent--come face to face with their own choices and fates. Bound together by danger, fear, paranoia, and the bumps we all hear in the night, these potent stories illuminate the darker side of the human condition. From a vicious newspaper strike that rocks a small Pennsylvania community to an unpredictable road trip in the vast desert of the American West, Bystanders explores the ways in which terror and uncertainty both consume and invigorate us--and yet reveal our strengths, hopes, and passions. Selected as the Grand Prize Winner for the SFWP Literary Awards Program, 2010, by Pulitzer Prize-winner Robert Olen Butler.

Smoking Cigarettes, Eating Glass: A Psychologist's Memoir

by Annita Sawyer

Annita Sawyer's memoir is a harrowing, heroic, and redeeming story of her battle with mental illness, and her triumph in overcoming it. In 1960, as a suicidal teenager, Sawyer was institutionalized, misdiagnosed, and suffered through 89 electroshock treatments before being transfered, labeled as "unimproved." The damage done has haunted her life. Discharged in 1966, after finally receiving proper psychiatric care, Sawyer kept her past secret and moved on to graduate from Yale University, raise two children, and become a respected psychotherapist. That is, until 2001, when she reviewed her hospital records and began to remember a broken childhood and the even more broken mental health system of the 1950s and 1960s, Revisiting scenes from her childhood and assembling the pieces of a lost puzzle, her autobiography is a cautionary tale of careless psychiatric diagnosis and treatment, both 50 years ago and today. It is an informative story about understanding PTSD and making emotional sense of events that can lead a soul to darkness. Most of all, it's a story of perseverance: pain, acceptance, healing, hope, and success. Hers is a unique voice for this generation, shedding light on an often misunderstood illness.

Muscle Cars

by Stephen Eoannou

The stories in Muscle Cars explore the unique and sometimes flawed relationships between men, their families, and their friends. Featuring a diverse cast of inarticulate misfits--including a compulsive body builder obsessed by the death of his brother, a former boxer forced to sell his prized 1946 New York Yankees-autographed baseball, and two boyhood friends who plan to steal Ted Williams' scientifically frozen head--this stand-out debut from Pushcart-nominated Eoannou is a powerful journey through the humor, darkness, and neuroses of the modern American everyman.

The Poor Children

by April L. Ford

This edgy, stunning collection deftly examines the underbelly of the human condition through a cross-section of fascinating characters--a correctional officer fixated on a juvenile offender, a Goth teenager and her werewolf boyfriend, a pyromaniac by happenstance, and a set of twins haunted by an unconfirmed death. Pushing beyond the norms of daily life and into the sometimes morally lawless worlds of her characters, Ford explores the eccentric, the perverse, the disenfranchised, and the darkly comic possibilities at play in us all.

'Zine

by Pagan Kennedy

Back in print for the first time in a decade, this is the hilarious autobiography of a pioneer of the 1990s zine movement. A young woman named Pagan, having just graduated from a writing program at a very prestigious university, is left with a single burning question: Now what? She then takes an unusual step by deciding to invent her new self--the one the public will know--by starting her own magazine, one that will be written, created, and star none other than herself.

By Way of Water

by Charlotte Gullick

A unique look at the Jehovah Witnesses in the rural western United States and the logging industry in Northern California during the 1970s, By Way of Water addresses the devastating effects of poverty on rural families. Struggling to feed their children in an unforgiving California forest when there are no logging jobs to be found, Jake and Dale Colby make personal vows that only make matters worse. Jake will not accept help from the government or his neighbors, and Dale won't allow him to hunt, believing her faith will sustain them. But one other member of the family makes a promise to herself. Seven-year-old Justy believes that she alone can hold the family together, even when her father's violence resurfaces. With a clear insight and the deepest empathy, Justy isolates the stark realities around her, even as she dreams with her mother of a safe world that only God can promise.

Showing 3,076 through 3,100 of 7,622 results

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