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Beat Punks

by Victor Bockris

The "poet laureate of the New York underground scene" chronicles three decades of electrifying artistic expression Once dominated by Beat Generation writers like Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg, by the 1970s and '80s, New York City's creative scene had given way to a punk rock-era defined by figures like Debbie Harry and Richard Hell. While the aesthetics of these two movements seem different on the surface, author and prolific interviewer Victor Bockris--who witnessed it all--argues that the punks borrowed from the ideology and style of the beats, and that the beats were reenergized by the emergence of punk. In intimate conversation, Bockris's close friends--including celebrities from both periods, such as William Burroughs, Andy Warhol, Joey Ramone, and Patti Smith--reveal more about themselves and their art to him than to any other interviewer. Along with dozens of rare photos, Bockris's interviews and essays capture the energy of this unique time.

With William Burroughs

by Victor Bockris

Personal encounters with one of the most influential and iconic figures of the Beat Generation During the 1970s, William Burroughs, author of Junky and Naked Lunch, lived in a loft on the Bowery in New York City's Lower East Side. Christened "The Bunker," his apartment became a modern-day literary salon with people like Andy Warhol, Lou Reed, Patti Smith, Susan Sontag, and fellow beat poet Allen Ginsberg passing through for a drink or a joint and the promise of stimulating conversation with the ingenious and eccentric Burroughs. Among Burroughs's entourage was author Victor Bockris, whose tape recorder was always running to capture meandering dinner party conversations and electric late-night sessions in the Bunker. In these moments, Bockris captures Burroughs's desires, anxieties, and thoughts on writing, photography, punk rock, and more. The recordings and recollections in With William Burroughs create an unprecedentedly multidimensional portrait of a man who is often overshadowed by his reputation.

The Memory of Light

by Francisco X. Stork

This beautiful novel from the author of Marcelo in the Real World about life after a suicide attempt is perfect for fans of It's Kind of a Funny Story and Thirteen Reasons Why. When Vicky Cruz wakes up in the Lakeview Hospital Mental Disorders ward, she knows one thing: After her suicide attempt, she shouldn't be alive. But then she meets Mona, the live wire; Gabriel, the saint; E.M., always angry; and Dr. Desai, a quiet force. With stories and honesty, kindness and hard work, they push her to reconsider her life before Lakeview, and offer her an acceptance she's never had. But Vicky's newfound peace is as fragile as the roses that grow around the hospital. And when a crisis forces the group to split up, sending Vick back to the life that drove her to suicide, she must try to find her own courage and strength. She may not have them. She doesn't know. Inspired in part by the author's own experience with depression, The Memory of Light is the rare young adult novel that focuses not on the events leading up to a suicide attempt, but the recovery from one -- about living when life doesn't seem worth it, and how we go on anyway.

Rise of the Wolf (Mark of the Thief, Book 2)

by Jennifer A. Nielsen

Nic may have escaped enslavement in the mines outside of Rome, but his troubles are far from over. The Praetor War -- the battle to destroy Rome from within -- is in full force, and Nic is caught in the crossfire. The secretive Praetors are determined to unlock a powerful amulet -- one sure to bring the empire to its knees. Worse, the Praetors believe Nic holds the key to finding this amulet, and they will stop at nothing to steal it, even if that means harming the people Nic holds most dear. When the Praetors capture Nic's mother, Nic knows he must do anything to save her. He challenges the Praetors to a chariot race. If he wins, they will release his mother. But if he loses, he must hand over a magic that will certainly bring about the end of Rome as well as his own life. Can Nic once again harness his magic and gather the strength to defeat his enemies? Or will he lose his mother and bear witness to Rome's destruction?

It's All Your Fault

by Paul Rudnick

"Paul Rudnick makes me lie hysterical on the floor, screeching with laughter and sobbing with fury that I can't write the way he does." -- E. Lockhart, author of We Were Liars and The Disreputable History of Frankie Landau-Banks My name is Caitlin and up until forty-eight hours ago I had never: Tasted alcohol, kissed a boy, sang in public at the top of my lungs, kidnapped anyone or -- WHAT? STOLEN A CONVERTIBLE? Now I'm in jail and I have no idea what I'm going to tell: The police, my parents, the mayor, all of those camera crews and everyone on Twitter. I have just noticed that: My nose is pierced and I have-WAIT? IS THAT A TATTOO? I blame one person for this entire insane weekend: My famous cousin. Who is also my former best friend. Who I have HATED for the past four years. Who I miss like crazy. NO I DON'T!!!! IT'S ALL YOUR FAULT, HELLER HARRIGAN!!!!

Final Quest (The Secrets of Droon: Special Edition #8)

by Tony Abbott

The secret is out--DROON is the series that kids, parents, and teachers are talking about! There are more than 9 million DROON books in print. An immortal dragon. A long hidden secret. The kingdom of Droon is at the brink of war. . . The situation in Droon has never been more desperate. The wizard Galen is missing. Eric has been forced undercover with Gethwing, the all-powerful Moon Dragon. And millions of beasts are assembling outside Jaffa City, ready to attack Droon's capital. Eric, Keeah, Neal, and Julie will do whatever it takes to save their beloved kingdom. But to defeat the Moon Dragon, they'll need to uncover the greatest secret in all of Droon. . . .

The Genie King (The Secrets of Droon: Special Edition #7)

by Tony Abbott Royce Fitzgerald

The secret is out--DROON is the series that kids, parents, and teachers are talking about! There are now over 9 million DROON books in print. Neal, Julie, and Keeah are on a quest to find the wizard Galen and his all-powerful Moon Medallion. But this is no ordinary mission, for the Moon Medallion is hidden in no ordinary place. It's somewhere in Ut, a magical city in a bottle that only appears once every one hundred years. Fortunately, as a genie, Neal can travel through time. But he'll need a little help from his fellow genies to find the Medallion. To prove himself, he must complete seven difficult trials. Will he pass the genies' test in time to save Galen?

Crown of Wizards (The Secrets of Droon: Special Edition #6)

by Tony Abbott David Merrell

The secret is out -- DROON is the series that kids, parents, and teachers are talking about! There are now over 10 million DROON books in print. Has Eric gone bad for good? The young wizard has joined forces with the villainous Moon Dragon, Gethwing, to seek out a magical artifact that will give them untold power. Keeah, Julie, Neal, Galen, and Max know they need to do whatever it takes to stop Eric and Gethwing-- even if it means putting their old friend in harm's way. But Gethwing is planning something more terrifying than even Galen can predict. And with Eric at his side, he may be unstoppable. . .

The Isle of Mists (Secrets of Droon #22)

by Tony Abbott

Three out of three! Sparr has found all of his Three Powers, and that adds up to big trouble for Droon. Armed with the Red Eye of Dawn, the Coiled Viper, and the Golden Wasp, Sparr is more powerful than ever. And once he reaches the Isle of Mists, he is going to try an amazing new magic trick. A trick to take over all of Droon. Eric, Keeah, and the others are hot on his trail. But they are worried. The Isle of Mists is where Sparr's stepfather, Emperor Ko, mysteriously disappeared. Some even say that the evil ruler is still alive there. Sparr plus the Three Powers plus Emperor Ko? For Eric and his friends, that's not a good equation.

Flight of the Genie (The Secrets of Droon #21)

by Tony Abbott David Merrell

Hailed as the perfect series for kids not quite ready for Harry Potter, the bestselling SECRETS OF DROON series is enchanting young readers everywhere! The city of Ut is a city of secrets. Mysteriously, it only appears once every one hundred years. And to enter, you need the key, which is kept in the magical bottle of Ut. Eric, Keeah, and the others need to get inside the city to help a friend. The good genie, Hoja, is being held prisoner there, and he needs rescuing! They have discovered the secret of the magic bottle, and so they know they can get inside the city walls. But what they don't know is that Ut holds other secrets. Dark, dangerous secrets. Secrets that involve a certain sorcerer named Sparr...

Managing Complexity

by Stephen Pickford Paola Subacchi Tanim Bayoumi

he financial crisis of 2007-09 spread across the globe, highlighting the economic interdependencies between all major countries and raising issues of international cooperation. Managing Complexity examines how, following the crisis, countries have changed the way they cooperate when it comes to economic policy.This volume, the result of a joint research project of Chatham House and the International Monetary Fund, brings together researchers and policymakers who were directly involved in the crisis. They provide a critical look at the challenges facing international policy cooperation and how the theory and practice of cooperation have evolved in the new postcrisis environment.

A Matter-of-Fact Magic Book: Secondhand Magic

by Ruth Chew

Let magic take you up, up, and away! After Paul and Caroline fix a broken kite, it's full of magic! The kite can fly on its own--and even better, it wants to take them on a ride. Now the two kids must hold on tight. . . . Their adventure is about to begin! For decades, Ruth Chew's classic chapter books full of everyday magic have enchanted early readers. Now that they are in print again, a new generation can fall under her spell and fall in love with reading. "Ruth Chew's classic books capture the joy of everyday magic." --Mary Pope Osborne, author of the Magic Tree House series

Sprout Street Neighbors: A New Arrival

by Anna Alter

There's a new neighbor on Sprout Street in this early reader series perfect for fans of Clementine, Just Grace, and Ivy & Bean. Lily has just moved into the empty apartment on Sprout Street all the way from Hawaii--and her new neighbors can't wait to meet her! Violet is happy there's someone in the building who shares her love of art. Emma is excited to have a new breakfast buddy. Henry is eager to show off his model ships. Lily is quick to lend a hand when she finds Wilbur in a pickle, and Fernando always welcomes another voice at the weekly Sprout Street meetings. Of course, sometimes a new friend can take some getting used to, but with neighbors like these, it's not long before Lily is part of the Sprout Street family, too.

The Case of the Girl in Grey (The Wollstonecraft Detective Agency, Book 2)

by Kelly Murphy Jordan Stratford

This history-mystery series continues with another fine display of brains and bravery from the Wollstonecraft Girls--Ada Bryon Lovelace and Mary Shelley. Inspired fun for middle grade readers and fans of The Mysterious Benedict Society and Lemony Snicket! The Wollstonecraft Detective Agency was supposed to be a secret constabulary, but after the success of their first case, all of London knows that Lady Ada and Mary are the girls to go to if you have a problem. Their new case is a puzzle indeed. It involves a horrible hospital, a missing will, a hasty engagement, and a suspiciously slippery servant. But Mary's stumbled onto a mystery of her own. She spotted a ghostly girl in a grey gown dashing through the park. A girl who is the spitting image of their new client. The two cases must be linked . . . or else there's a perfectly supernatural explanation.

Pugs of the Frozen North

by Philip Reeve Sarah Mcintyre

With a little luck and a pack of pugs, anything is paws-ible! When True Winter comes, it's time for the Great Northern Race! The best sled teams in the world must reach a mysterious man called the Snowfather. He will grant one wish to the winners. Young racers Sika and Shen want to win more than anything. But they don't have big sled dogs--all they have is sixty-six yappy, yippy puppy pugs. Can this unlikely team make their dreams come true? For early chapter book readers who are ready for something longer, the Not-So-Impossible Tales are packed with humor, action, and color illustrations on almost every page."A madcap, magical blend of fluff and other good stuff."--Kirkus Reviews, starred reviewFrom the Hardcover edition.

Henry Wants More!

by Linda Ashman

More games, more races, more tickles, more books--little Henry can't get enough! When a toddler is armed with that useful word and the world is full of brand-new things, his family just doesn't stand a chance. Follow Henry on his exhausting and all-too-familiar day filled with play . . . and a lot of love! Buoyant rhymes and charming illustrations strike a heartwarming note that will ring true with families of energetic little ones.

Unspeakable Things

by Kathleen Spivack

A wild, erotic novel--a daring debut--from the much-admired, award-winning poet, author of Flying Inland, A History of Yearning, and With Robert Lowell and His Circle: Sylvia Plath, Anne Sexton, Elizabeth Bishop, Stanley Kunitz, and Others. A strange, haunting novel about survival and love in all its forms; about sexual awakenings and dark secrets; about European refugee intellectuals who have fled Hitler's armies with their dreams intact and who have come to an elusive new (American) "can do, will do" world they cannot seem to find. A novel steeped in surreal storytelling and beautiful music that transports its half-broken souls--and us--to another realm of the senses. The setting: the early 1940s, New York--city of refuge, city of hope, with the specter of a red-hot Europe at war.At the novel's center: Anna (known as the Rat), an exotic Hungarian countess with the face of an angel, beautiful eyes, and a seraphic smile, with a passionate intelligence, an exquisite ugliness, and the power to enchant . . . Her second cousin Herbert, a former minor Austrian civil servant who believes in Esperanto and the international rights of man, wheeling and dealing in New York, powerful in the social sphere yet under the thumb of his wife, Adeline . . . Michael, their missing homosexual son . . . Felix, a German pediatrician who dabbles in genetic engineering, practicing from his Upper East Side office with his little dachshund, Schatzie, by his side . . . The Tolstoi String Quartet, four men and their instruments, who for twenty years lived as one, playing the great concert halls of Europe, escaping to New York with their money sewn into the silk linings of their instrument cases . . .And watching them all: Herbert's eight-year-old granddaughter, Maria, who understands from the furtive fear of her mother, and the huddled penury of their lives, and the sense of being in hiding, even in New York, that life is a test of courage and silence, Maria witnessing the family's strange comings and goings, being regaled at night, when most are asleep, with the intoxicating, thrilling stories of their secret pasts . . . of lives lived in Saint Petersburg . . . of husbands being sent to the front and large, dangerous debts owed to the Tsar of imperial Russia, of late-night visits by coach to the palace of the Romanovs to beg for mercy and avoid execution . . . and at the heart of the stories, told through the long nights with no dawn in sight, the strange, electrifying tale of a pact made in desperation with the private adviser to the Tsar and Tsarina--the mystic faith healer Grigory Rasputin (Russian for "debauched one"), a pact of "companionship" between Anna (the Rat) and the scheming Siberian peasant-turned-holy man, called the Devil by some, the self-proclaimed "only true Christ," meeting night after night in Rasputin's apartments, and the spellbinding, unspeakable things done there in the name of penance and pleasure . . .From the Hardcover edition.

Shaker

by Scott Frank

Meet Roy Cooper, stoic, unassuming "errand runner" for various New York criminals. Roy arrives in Los Angeles to shoot a man named Martin Shine a week after a powerful earthquake has knocked out cell service, buckled the freeways, and thrown L.A. into chaos. Roy doesn't know who Shine is or why he has to die, but he does his job and does it well. Except for one thing: after the hit, Roy can't find where he parked his car. Wandering the streets of North Hollywood, he stumbles upon a jogger getting mugged and beaten by four young gangbangers. Despite his attempt to simply put his head down and walk away, Roy winds up in the middle of another killing. Things get more complicated when the murdered jogger turns out to be a controversial mayoral candidate. Roy himself is shot twice, hospitalized in critical condition, and mistaken for a hero when a local resident leaks a video that goes viral. Now meet the rest of the cast of characters, including Kelly Maguire, a disgraced LAPD detective with an anger management problem and strange feelings about L.A.'s newest hero; Science, the teenage gangbanger/shooter, who needs to keep Roy quiet about what he's seen; Mayor Miguel Santiago, who finds himself facing accusations that he's just had his opponent whacked; Albert Budin, Roy's onetime mentor and one of the scariest, creepiest characters in recent crime fiction; and myriad criminals, politicians, and cops who all need Roy to disappear--preferably forever. Finally, meet Scott Frank, who has created not just one of the most entertaining novels of the year but also one of the most surprising. This first novel is fun and funny as well as moving and textured, nuanced and powerful. Shaker is the debut work of fiction by a major new storyteller.From the Hardcover edition.

The Swans of Fifth Avenue

by Melanie Benjamin

The New York Times bestselling author of The Aviator's Wife returns with a triumphant new novel about New York's "Swans" of the 1950s--and the scandalous, headline-making, and enthralling friendship between literary legend Truman Capote and peerless socialite Babe Paley. Of all the glamorous stars of New York high society, none blazes brighter than Babe Paley. Her flawless face regularly graces the pages of Vogue, and she is celebrated and adored for her ineffable style and exquisite taste, especially among her friends--the alluring socialite Swans Slim Keith, C. Z. Guest, Gloria Guinness, and Pamela Churchill. By all appearances, Babe has it all: money, beauty, glamour, jewels, influential friends, a prestigious husband, and gorgeous homes. But beneath this elegantly composed exterior dwells a passionate woman--a woman desperately longing for true love and connection. Enter Truman Capote. This diminutive golden-haired genius with a larger-than-life personality explodes onto the scene, setting Babe and her circle of Swans aflutter. Through Babe, Truman gains an unlikely entrée into the enviable lives of Manhattan's elite, along with unparalleled access to the scandal and gossip of Babe's powerful circle. Sure of the loyalty of the man she calls "True Heart," Babe never imagines the destruction Truman will leave in his wake. But once a storyteller, always a storyteller--even when the stories aren't his to tell. Truman's fame is at its peak when such notable celebrities as Frank and Mia Sinatra, Lauren Bacall, and Rose Kennedy converge on his glittering Black and White Ball. But all too soon, he'll ignite a literary scandal whose repercussions echo through the years. The Swans of Fifth Avenue will seduce and startle readers as it opens the door onto one of America's most sumptuous eras.Advance praise for The Swans of Fifth Avenue "The strange and fascinating relationship between Truman Capote and his 'swans' is wonderfully reimagined in this engrossing novel. It's a credit to Benjamin that we end up caring so much for these women of power, grace, and beauty--and for Capote, too."--Sara Gruen, New York Times bestselling author of Water for Elephants "A delicious tale . . . Melanie Benjamin has turned Truman Capote's greatest scandal into your next must-read book-club selection."--Jamie Ford, New York Times bestselling author of Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet"Reading The Swans of Fifth Avenue is like being ushered into a party where you're offered champagne and fed the sumptuous secrets of New York's elite--without having to pay the price afterward."--Vanessa Diffenbaugh, New York Times bestselling author of The Language of Flowers "Benjamin convincingly portrays a large cast of colorful historical figures while crafting a compelling, gossipy narrative with rich emotional depth."--Library Journal "The beautiful people of the fifties and sixties glitter in this riveting tale of betrayal and greed. . . . Irresistible, astonishing, and told with verve."--Lynn Cullen, bestselling author of Mrs. Poe "The season's must-read guilty pleasure . . . From Truman Capote's devious charm to Babe Paley's tragic glamour, Melanie Benjamin conjures, in vivid detail, a lost world."--Michael Callahan, author of Searching for Grace Kelly "A deliciously spiky novel of love and betrayal."--Alex George, author of A Good AmericanFrom the Hardcover edition.

Constantine and the Captive Christians of Persia

by Kyle Smith

It is widely believed that the Emperor Constantine's conversion to Christianity politicized religious allegiances, dividing the Christian Roman Empire from the Zoroastrian Sasanian Empire and leading to the persecution of Christians in Persia. This account, however, is based on Greek ecclesiastical histories and Syriac martyrdom narratives that date to centuries after the fact. In this groundbreaking study, Kyle Smith analyzes diverse Greek, Latin, and Syriac sources to show that there was not a single history of fourth-century Mesopotamia. By examining the conflicting hagiographical and historical evidence, Constantine and the Captive Christians of Persia presents an evocative and evolving portrait of the first Christian emperor, uncovering how Syriac Christians manipulated the image of their western Christian counterparts to fashion their own political and religious identities during this century of radical change.

Farewell to the God of Plague

by Miriam Gross

Farewell to the God of Plague reassesses the celebrated Maoist health care model through the lens of Mao's famous campaign against snail fever. Using newly available archives, Miriam Gross documents how economic, political, and cultural realities led to grassroots resistance. Nonetheless, the campaign triumphed, but not because of its touted mass-prevention campaign. Instead, success came from its unacknowledged treatment arm, carried out jointly by banished urban doctors and rural educated youth. More broadly, the author reconsiders the relationship between science and political control during the ostensibly antiscientific Maoist era, discovering the important role of "grassroots science" in regime legitimation and Party control in rural areas.

Jazz Diasporas

by Rashida K. Braggs

At the close of the Second World War, waves of African American musicians migrated to Paris, eager to thrive in its reinvigorated jazz scene. Jazz Diasporas challenges the notion that Paris was a color-blind paradise for African Americans. On the contrary, musicians adopted a variety of strategies to cope with the cultural and social assumptions that confronted them throughout their careers in Paris, particularly as France became embroiled in struggles over race and identity when colonial conflicts like the Algerian War escalated. Using case studies of prominent musicians and thoughtful analysis of interviews, music, film, and literature, Rashida K. Braggs investigates the impact of this postwar musical migration. She examines key figures including musicians Sidney Bechet, Inez Cavanaugh, and Kenny Clarke and writer and social critic James Baldwin to show how they performed both as artists and as African Americans. Their collaborations with French musicians and critics complicated racial and cultural understandings of who could represent "authentic" jazz and created spaces for shifting racial and national identities--what Braggs terms "jazz diasporas."

A Passion for Society

by Arthur Kleinman Iain Wilkinson

What does human suffering mean for society? And how has this meaning changed from the past to the present? In what ways does "the problem of suffering" serve to inspire us to care for others? How does our response to suffering reveal our moral and social conditions? In this trenchant work, Arthur Kleinman--a renowned figure in medical anthropology--and Iain Wilkinson, an award-winning sociologist, team up to offer some answers to these profound questions.A Passion for Society investigates the historical development and current state of social science with a focus on how this development has been shaped in response to problems of social suffering. Following a line of criticism offered by key social theorists and cultural commentators who themselves were unhappy with the professionalization of social science, Wilkinson and Kleinman provide a critical commentary on how studies of society have moved from an original concern with social suffering and its amelioration to dispassionate inquiries. The authors demonstrate how social action through caring for others is revitalizing and remaking the discipline of social science, and they examine the potential for achieving greater understanding though a moral commitment to the practice of care for others. In this deeply considered work, Wilkinson and Kleinman argue for an engaged social science that connects critical thought with social action, that seeks to learn through caregiving, and that operates with a commitment to establish and sustain humane forms of society.

Zorba the Buddha

by Hugh B. Urban

Zorba the Buddha is the first comprehensive study of the life, teachings, and following of the controversial Indian guru known in his youth as Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh and in his later years as Osho (1931-1990). Most Americans today remember him only as the "sex guru" and the "Rolls Royce guru," who built a hugely successful but scandal-ridden utopian community in central Oregon during the 1980s. Yet Osho was arguably the first truly global guru of the twentieth century, creating a large transnational movement that traced a complex global circuit from post-Independence India of the 1960s to Reagan's America of the 1980s and back to a developing new India in the 1990s. The Osho movement embodies some of the most important economic and spiritual currents of the past forty years, emerging and adapting within an increasingly interconnected and conflicted late-capitalist world order. Based on extensive ethnographic and archival research, Hugh Urban has created a rich and powerful narrative that is a must-read for anyone interested in religion and globalization.

The Red Sea

by Alexis Wick

The Red Sea has, from time immemorial, been one of the world's most navigated spaces, in the pursuit of trade, pilgrimage and conquest. Yet this multidimensional history remains largely unrevealed by its successive protagonists. Intrigued by the absence of a holistic portrayal of this body of water and inspired by Fernand Braudel's famous work on the Mediterranean, this book brings alive a dynamic Red Sea world across time, revealing the particular features of a unique historical actor. In capturing this heretofore lost space, it also presents a critical, conceptual history of the sea, leading the reader into the heart of Eurocentrism. The Sea, it is shown, is a vital element of the modern philosophy of history.Alexis Wick is not satisfied with this inclusion of the Red Sea into history and attendant critique of Eurocentrism. Contrapuntally, he explores how the world and the sea were imagined differently before imperial European hegemony. Searching for the lost space of Ottoman visions of the sea, The Red Sea makes a deeper argument about the discipline of history and the historian's craft.

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