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Secondhand Souls

by Christopher Moore

In San Francisco, the souls of the dead are mysteriously disappearing--and you know that can't be good--in New York Times bestselling author Christopher Moore's delightfully funny sequel to A Dirty Job.<P><P> Something really strange is happening in the City by the Bay. People are dying, but their souls are not being collected. Someone--or something--is stealing them and no one knows where they are going, or why, but it has something to do with that big orange bridge. Death Merchant Charlie Asher is just as flummoxed as everyone else. He's trapped in the body of a fourteen-inch-tall "meat puppet" waiting for his Buddhist nun girlfriend, Audrey, to find him a suitable new body to play host.<P> To get to the bottom of this abomination, a motley crew of heroes will band together: the seven-foot-tall death merchant Minty Fresh; retired policeman turned bookseller Alphonse Rivera; the Emperor of San Francisco and his dogs, Bummer and Lazarus; and Lily, the former Goth girl. Now if only they can get little Sophie to stop babbling about the coming battle for the very soul of humankind...<P>

Sisters in Sanity

by Gayle Forman

"Where are they taking me?""It's for your own good, Brit," Dad said.I was shoved into a small, stuffy room, and the door was locked behind me. I waited for my dad to realize he'd made a terrible mistake and come get me.But he didn't.For sixteen-year-old Brit Hemphill, it's hard to know who she can trust. Convinced she's out of control, her father has sentenced her to Red Rock: a center for supposedly rebellious teens, where the therapy consists of name-calling and the girls who get privileges are the ones who rat out their peers.But then Brit meets V, Bebe, Martha, and Cassie--four girls who keep her from going over the edge. Together, they'll hold on to their sanity and their sisterhood despite the bleak Red Rock reality.

A Naked Singularity: A Novel

by Sergio De La Pava

A Naked Singularity tells the story of Casi, a child of Colombian immigrants who lives in Brooklyn and works in Manhattan as a public defender--one who, tellingly has never lost a trial. Never. In the book, we watch what happens when his sense of justice and even his sense of self begin to crack--and how his world then slowly devolves. It's a huge, ambitious novel clearly in the vein of DeLillo, Foster Wallace, Pynchon, and even Melville, and it's told in a distinct, frequently hilarious voice, with a striking human empathy at its center. Its panoramic reach takes readers through crime and courts, immigrant families and urban blight, media savagery and media satire, scatology and boxing, and even a breathless heist worthy of any crime novel. If InfiniteJest stuck a pin in the map of mid-90s culture and drew our trajectory from there, A Naked Singularity does the same for the feeling of surfeit, brokenness, and exhaustion that permeates our civic and cultural life today. In the opening sentence of William Gaddis's A Frolic of His Own, a character sneers, "Justice? You get justice in the next world. In this world, you get the law." A Naked Singularity reveals the extent of that gap, and lands firmly on the side of those who are forever getting the law.

What We Talk About When We Talk About Clone Club: Bioethics and Philosophy in Orphan Black

by Gregory E. Pence

What is the real-world history and science of human cloning, and does Orphan Black get it right? Can you "own" a person-even a cloned one? How can Sarah Manning be straight, Cosima gay, and Tony trans? Cult hit sci-fi show Orphan Black doesn't just entertain-it also raises fascinating questions about human cloning, its ethics, and its impact on personal identity.In What We Talk About When We Talk About Clone Club: Bioethics and Philosophy in Orphan Black, prominent bioethicist Gregory E. Pence violates Clone Club's first rule to take us deeper into the show and its connections to the real world, including:Widespread myths about human clones (and Orphan Black's rejection of them)Our ugly history of eugenicsThe ethics of human experimentation, by way of Projects Castor and LedaWhat we can learn about clones and identity from twin studies and tensions among Orphan Black's clone "sisters"Kendall Malone and other genetic anomaliesThe brave new world of genetic enhancement and clonal dynasties, and how Helena and Kira Manning fit inIn the process, What We Talk About When We Talk About Clone Club reveals why Orphan Black is some of today's most engaging and thought-provoking television.

Beauty's Punishment: A Novel

by Anne Rice A. N. Roquelaure

The delicious and erotically charged sequel to The Claiming of Sleeping Beauty, from the author of Beauty's Kingdom. This sequel to The Claiming of Sleeping Beauty, the first of Anne Rice's (writing as A.N. Roquelaure) elegantly written volumes of erotica, continues her explicit, teasing exploration of the psychology of human desire. Now Beauty, having indulged in a secret and forbidden infatuation with the rebellious slave Prince Tristan, is sent away from the Satyricon-like world of the Castle. Sold at auction, she will soon experience the tantalizing punishments of "the village," as her education in love, cruelty, dominance, submission, and tenderness is turned over to the brazenly handsome Captain of the Guard. And once again Rice's fabulous tale of pleasure and pain dares to explore the most primal and well-hidden desires of the human heart. Preceding the visceral eroticism of E.L. James' Fifty Shades of Grey and Sylvia Day's Bared to You, and even more haunting than her own novel Belinda, this second installment is not to be missed.

Robinson Crusoe

by Daniel Defoe Paul Theroux Robert Mayer

Daniel Defoe relates the tale of an English sailor marooned on a desert island for nearly three decades. An ordinary man struggling to survive in extraordinary circumstances, Robinson Crusoe wrestles with fate and the nature of God. This edition features maps.

Understanding Objectivism: A Guide to Learning Ayn Rand's Philosophy

by Leonard Peikoff Michael S. Berliner

Based on a series of lectures given in 1983 by Dr. Leonard Peikoff, Understanding Objectivism offers a deeper and more profound study of Ayn Rand's philosophy, and outlines a methodology of how to approach the study of Objectivism and apply its principles to one's life.For the legions of readers who treasure Atlas Shrugged and The Fountainhead, and who savor cogent analysis and provocative discussion of Ayn Rand's thoughts and beliefs, Understanding Objectivism takes the stimulating study of Rand's philosophy to the next level.

A Spinster's Luck: Signet Regency Romance (InterMix)

by Rhonda Woodward

From Rhonda Woodward, a writer with "sparkle and heart," comes a beloved Signet Regency Romance--available digitally for the first time. Luck has always eluded Celia Langston. When her parents passed away ten years ago, she had to make her own way in the world, forsaking a come-out Season in London--and any chance at marriage. But Celia, now a governess, has never been one for self-pity. Rather, at the age of six-and-twenty, she has accepted the lot Fate has dealt her--that of a spinster...With his handsome face, reputation for bravery in the war, and princely fortune, the Duke of Severly has never suffered for want of female companionship. The crème de la crème hang on his every word. So when he takes notice of his nephews' governess--for even the plainest of gray dresses cannot conceal her regal poise and delicious curves--Severly surprises even himself. For one, he has never admired a woman below his station, let alone a governess. For another, Celia seems to hold a grudge against him. But her rejection of him only fans the flames of his desire, and Severly knows he's in for a long and difficult chase..."Rhonda Woodward shows a definite flair for the Regency period."--The Romance Reader"A talented writer."--Rakehell"[Rhonda Woodward has] historically accurate writing that shines."--All About Romance

McTeague

by Frank Norris Eric Solomon Vince Passaro

Frank Norris' graphic portrayal of the seamy side of survival in turn-of-the-century urban America remains shocking and powerful today -and its conclusion just as harrowing.

Unveiling: A Novel

by Suzanne M. Wolfe

Still reeling from her recent divorce, Rachel Piers steps off the plane in Rome, prepared to embark on a demanding art restoration project that could enhance her reputation as a rising star in her profession. As she uncovers layers of grime on what could prove to be a lost Flemish masterpiece, Rachel finds that layers of her own soul--layers that she would rather have kept hidden--are being stripped away. Imbued with historical and artistic detail, Unveiling will appeal to readers of A. S. Byatt's Possession and Tracy Chevalier's Girl with a Pearl Earring. Beautifully written, it brings the venerable city of Rome vividly to life and illuminates the power of art, imagination, and beauty to speak directly to the heart.

Times Tables Cheat

by Anastasia Suen

The students in Miss K's class experience situations that occur in schools everywhere. When he refuses to help Dalton cheat on his multiplication test, Alex then suggests they study together, helping each other with their weak subjects. Isaiah's story teaches about cheating, priorities, and friendship with brilliant illustrations and humorous text. What Do You Think? quetions, Miss K's Classroom rules, and a glossary aid teachers in classroom discussions about the character trait of cheating featured in this stunning picture book. Special thanks to content consultant Vicki F. Panaccione Ph. D.

What Are We Fighting For?: Sex, Race, Class and the Future of Feminism

by Joanna Russ

A study of the future of feminism calls for a return to the radical roots of feminism's direct political struggle during the 1960s and early 1970s and a move away from the de-politicized focus on women's psychology and personal relations of today.

Abbeville

by Jack Fuller

Until the dot.com bubble burst, George Bailey never gave much thought to why his grandfather seemed so happy.But then George's wealth vanished, rocking his self-confidence, threatening his family's security and making his adolescent son's difficult life even more painful. Returning to the little Central Illinois farm town of Abbeville, where his grandfather had prospered and then fallen into ruin, flattened during the Depression, George seeks out the details of this remarkable man's rise, fall, and spiritual rebirth, hoping he might find a way to recover himself.Abbeville sweeps through the history of late-19th through early-21st century America-among loggers stripping the North Woods bare, at the World's Columbian Exposition of 1893, with French soldiers at the Battle of Verdun, into the abyss of the Depression, and finally toward the new millennium's own nightmares. At the same time it examines life at its most intimate. How can one hold onto meaning amidst the brutally indifferent cycles of war and peace, flood and drought, boom and bust, life and death?In clean, evocative prose that reveals the complexity of people's moral and spiritual lives, Fuller tells the simple story of a man riding the crests and chasms of the 20th century, struggling through personal grief, war, and material failure to find a place where the spirit may repose. An American story about rediscovering where we've been and how we've come to be who we are today, Abbeville tells the tale of the world in small, of one man's pilgrimage to come to terms with himself while learning to embrace the world around him.

The 30-Minute Shakespeare Anthology: 18 Student Scenes with Monologues

by William Shakespeare Nick Newlin

Drawing on his eighteen years of experience as a teaching artist for Folger Shakespeare Library, Nick Newlin offers eighteen scenes to get young actors on their feet performing Shakespeare with confidence, understanding, and fun!Each scene averages five minutes in length, containing two to six characters, and features a monologue that young performers can use in performance, audition, or competition. Every scene has been "road tested" by one of Newlin's student groups at the Folger's annual Secondary School Shakespeare Festival, and includes dynamic stage directions and incisive performance notes to help teachers and students bring Shakespeare's plays to life.The 30-Minute Shakespeare Anthology includes one scene and monologue from eighteen of Shakespeare's greatest plays, including Romeo and Juliet, Macbeth, Hamlet, Othello, A Midsummer Night's Dream, Julius Caesar, Much Ado About Nothing, As You Like It, The Merchant of Venice, and The Taming of the Shrew.Additionally, the anthology contains a scene and monologue from Henry IV Part I, King Lear, As You Like It, The Comedy of Errors, The Tempest, Twelfth Night, The Merry Wives of Windsor, and Love's Labor's Lost.Also featured is an essay by editor Nick Newlin on how to produce a Shakespeare play with novice actors, and notes about the original production of this abridgment at the Folger Shakespeare Library's annual Student Shakespeare Festival. Each scene and monologue has accompanying notes and performance suggestions.

Shopping for Votes: How Politicians Choose Us and We Choose Them

by Susan Delacourt

This second edition offers an insightful and provocative look at the inside world of political marketing in Canada-and what this means about the state of our democracy in the twenty-first century-from a leading political commentator.Inside the political backrooms of Ottawa, the Mad Men of Canadian politics are planning their next consumer friendly pitch. Where once politics was seen as a public service, increasingly it's seen as a business, and citizens are the customers. But its unadvertised products are voter apathy and gutless public policy. Susan Delacourt takes readers into the world of Canada's top political marketers, from the 1950s to the present, explaining how parties slice and dice their platforms for different audiences and how they manage the media. The current system divides the country into "niche" markets and abandons the hard political work of knitting together broad consensus or national vision. Little wonder then, that most Canadians have checked out of the political process: less than two per cent of the population belongs to a political party and fewer than half of voters under the age of thirty showed up at the ballot box in the last few federal elections. Provocative, incisive, entertaining and refreshingly non-partisan, Shopping for Votes offers a new narrative for understanding political culture in Canada.

Wigford Rememberies

by Kyp Harness

Wigford is a small town in rural Southwestern Ontario, home to a cast of recurring characters: Buzz, a drunk-driving father of two; his wife, who should have married Bert Walmsley instead; Happy Henry, a devout, socially inept apostle who loves to play the organ; Elmer, a stroke survivor.Wigford Rememberies tells this community's stories through an impressionistic series of vignettes. The language is inventive, innovative and exciting, and whether describing mucking out the pig barn-"there in the dust and the sweet smells of grain and straw and the heavy brown odour of shit so strong it makes you sneeze"-or helping a drunk articulate how to manipulate God's forgiveness-"'if I gave my heart to Jesus-right there on my deathbed the minute before I died-he'd forgive everything an I'd go up into Heaven and be saved just as much as the other guy who never did nothin' wrong at all with no difference?'"-Harness wields words with an eye for detail, musicality and style.Visceral, reflective and lyrical, Wigford Rememberies is a poetic evocation of mood and epiphanic realizations, and will resonate with anyone who has ever confronted suffering, love or the unknowable.

How to Be Eaten by a Lion

by Michael Johnson

From the monk who sets himself on fire in a crowded intersection of Saigon ("the familiar corded tendons of his hands, become / a bracken of ashes, a carbon twine of burnt"), to the salmon run in British Columbia ("The salmon word / for home is glacierdust and once-tall trees unlimbed, / a taste, no matter where, they know"), Johnson writes of topics varied and eclectic, unified by a focus on moments both declining and revenant.Startling and haunting, the poems delve into the ways in which these moments are transformative, beautiful and unexpected. Being eaten by a lion is a gift rather than a loss, an opportunity for grace: "Instead, focus on your life, / its crimson liquor he grows drunk on. / Notice the way the red highlights his face, / how the snub nose is softened, the lips made / fuller; notice his deft musculature, his rapture."Lyrical and rich with visceral imagery, How to Be Eaten by a Lion lingers, exploring the world with an eye for detail and an ear for music.

The Red Files

by Lisa Bird-Wilson

This debut poetry collection from Lisa Bird-Wilson reflects on the legacy of the residential school system: the fragmentation of families and histories, with blows that resonate through the generations.Inspired by family and archival sources, Bird-Wilson assembles scraps of a history torn apart by colonial violence. The collection takes its name from the federal government's complex organizational structure of residential schools archives, which are divided into "black files" and "red files." In vignettes as clear as glass beads, her poems offer affection to generations of children whose presence within the historic record is ghostlike, anonymous and ephemeral.The collection also explores the larger political context driving the mechanisms that tore apart families and cultures, including the Sixties Scoop. It depicts moments of resistance, both personal and political, as well as official attempts at reconciliation: "I can hold in the palm of my right hand / all that I have left: one story-gift from an uncle, / a father's surname, treaty card, Cree accent echo, metal bits, grit- / and I will still have room to cock a fist."The Red Files concludes with a fierce hopefulness, embracing the various types of love that can begin to heal the traumas inflicted by a legacy of violence.

How Festive the Ambulance

by Kim Fu

In this debut poetry collection by award-winning author Kim Fu, incantations, mythical creatures and extreme violence illuminate small scenes of domestic life and the banal tragedies of modern love and modern death.A sharp edge of humour slices through Fu's poetry, drawing attention to the distance between contemporary existence and the basic facts of life: "In the classrooms of tomorrow, starved youth will be asked to imagine a culture that kept thin pamphlets of poetry pinned to a metal box full of food, who honoured their gods of plenty by describing ingredients in lush language."Alternating between incisive wit and dark beauty, Fu brings the rich symbolism of fairy tales to bear on our image-obsessed age. From "The Unicorn Princess": "She applies gold spray paint to her horn each morning, / hoping to imitate the brass tusks / on the unicorns skewered to the carousel, / their brittle, painted smiles, harnesses / embedded in their backs and shellacked to high gloss." These poems are utterly of-the-moment, capturing the rage, irony and isolation of the era we live in.

Lily

by Jane Smiley

A Vintage Shorts "Short Story Month" Selection From the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of the classic A Thousand Acres and winner of the 1985 O. Henry Award, "Lily"--first published as part of the classic collection of short stories, The Age of Grief--is the dazzling, tragic portrait of a beautiful and lonely young poet who meddles in her longtime friends' marriage when they come to visit. Neither Kevin nor Nancy seemed at all interested in Lily's life in the couple of years since they've last seen her. But she has suffered through hours of their squabbling, awkwardly endured complaints from each about the other, and when Kevin finally demands to know if his wife still loves him, Lily must decide whether she wants to end this frustrating intrusion into the calm of her life for good. An ebook short.

Sailing to Sarantium: Book One of the Sarantine Mosaic

by Guy Gavriel Kay

Crispin is a master mosaicist, creating beautiful art with colored stones and glass. Summoned to Sarantium by imperial request, he bears a Queen's secret mission, and a talisman from an alchemist. Once in the fabled city, with its taverns and gilded sanctuaries, chariot races and palaces, intrigues and violence, Crispin must find his own source of power in order to survive-and unexpectedly discovers it high on the scaffolding of his own greatest creation.

Sharpe's Eagle

by Bernard Cornwell

After the cowardly incompetence of two officers besmirches their name, Captain Richard Sharpe must redeem the regiment by capturing the most valued prize in the French Army--a golden Imperial Eagle, the standard touched by the hand of Napoleon himself.

The Danish Girl

by David Ebershoff

Now an Academy Award-winning major motion picture, starring Academy Award-winners Eddie Redmayne and Alicia Vikander and directed by Academy Award-winner Tom Hooper National Bestseller * A New York Times Notable Book * Winner of the Lambda Literary Award for Transgender Fiction * Winner of the Rosenthal Foundation Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters * Finalist for the New York Public Library Young Lions Award * Finalist for the American Library Association Stonewall Book AwardLoosely inspired by a true story, this tender portrait of marriage asks: What do you do when the person you love has to change? It starts with a question, a simple favor asked by a wife of her husband while both are painting in their studio, setting off a transformation neither can anticipate. Uniting fact and fiction into an original romantic vision, The Danish Girl eloquently portrays the unique intimacy that defines every marriage and the remarkable story of Lili Elbe, a pioneer in transgender history, and the woman torn between loyalty to her marriage and her own ambitions and desires. The Danish Girl's lush prose and generous emotional insight make it, after the last page is turned, a deeply moving first novel about one of the most passionate and unusual love stories of the 20th century.From the Trade Paperback edition.

Sea of Cortez: A Leisurely Journal of Travel and Research

by John Steinbeck Edward F. Ricketts

More information to be announced soon on this forthcoming title from Penguin USA.

Dead Beat: A Novel of The Dresden Files

by Jim Butcher

When a killer vampire threatens to destroy head of Special Investigations Karrin Murphy's reputation unless Harry delivers the powerful Word of Kemmler to her, he has no choice. Now Harry is in a race against time to find the Word before Chicago experiences a Halloween night to wake the dead.From the Paperback edition.

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