Browse Results What Format Should I Choose?

Showing 3,401 through 3,425 of 26,532 results

Vietnam Diary

by Richard Tregaskis

"The first definitive eyewitness account of the combat in Vietnam, this unforgettable, vividly illustrated report records the story of the 14,000 Americans fighting in a new kind of war. Written by one of the most knowledgeable and experienced of America's war correspondents, Vietnam Diary shows how we developed new techniques for resisting wily guerrilla forces.Roaming the whole of war-torn Vietnam, Tregaskis takes his readers on the tense U.S. missions--with the Marine helicopters and the Army HU1B's (Hueys); with the ground pounders on the embattled Delta area, the fiercest battlefield of Vietnam; then to the Special Forces, men chosen for the job of training Montagnard troops to resist Communists in the high jungles.Mr. Tregaskis tells the stirring human story of American fighting men deeply committed to their jobs--the Captain who says: "You have to feel that it's a personal problem--that if they go under, we go under;" the wounded American advisor who deserted the hospital to rejoin his unit; the father of five killed on his first mission the day before Christmas; the advisor who wouldn't take leave because he loved his wife and feared he would go astray in Saigon. And the dramatic battle reports cover the massive efforts of the Vietnamese troops to whom the Americans are leaders and advisors.An authority on the wars against communism is Asia, Tregaskis has reported extensively on the Chinese Civil War, Korea, the Guerrilla wars in Indochina, Malaya, and Indonesia. He was the winner of the George Polk Award in 1964 for reporting under hazardous conditions.-Print ed.

We Dropped The A-Bomb

by Merle Miller Abe Spitzer

The amazing story of the crew of the B-29 bomber The Great Artiste, who flew in both missions that dropped atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Written by noted novelist and script writer Merle Miller and the radio operator of the B-29 Abe Sptizer, it is a fascinating first-hand account of the end of World War II and the beginning of the Nuclear Age."None of us knew for sure what the "gimmick" was, not even after the fire and smoke rolled up toward us from Hiroshima and it looked as if the sun had fallen out of the sky and was on the ground. Not until a few minutes later when we had broken away from the danger zone and Colonel Paul W. Tibbets, our group commander and pilot of the B-29 that let go with the first bomb, said over the radio, "Well, boys, you have just dropped the first atomic bomb in history.""Even then it didn't sink in. I didn't know what an atomic bomb was or what it had done to the city of Hiroshima below or what a far worse bomb would do a few days later when we let it go over Nagasaki."

Death In The Forest; The Story Of The Katyn Forest Massacre

by J. K. Zawodny

MORE THAN 15,000 Polish soldiers, among them 800 Doctors of Medicine, were murdered in one operation. Originally they had been taken into captivity by the Soviet Army in 1939. There was a possibility, however, that the prisoners, while still alive, had been taken from Soviet custody by German forces in 1941.Some of the bodies were found in German-held territory. The ropes with which their hands were tied were Soviet-made, but the bullets with which the men were killed were of German origin.The Soviet and German governments accused each other of the massacre. To obtain or remove the evidence, the intelligence services of several nations carried on a merciless secret contest in the Katyn Forest, Poland, Germany, Italy, England, and the United States. Men disappeared; so did files, including one from the United States Military Intelligence Office. In the process a key witness was found hanged, diplomatic and military careers were destroyed in the United States, personnel of the International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg lied by omission, and so did some of the greatest Allied leaders of the Second World War.This book attempts to reconstruct, in detail, the fate of the prisoners and to provide the answers to these questions:(1) Who killed these men?(2) How were they killed?(3) Why were they killed?

A Year In Treblinka

by Jankiel Wiernik

An Inmate Who Escaped Tells The Day-To-Day Facts Of One Year Of His Torturous Experiences.Jankiel Wiernik was a Jewish property manager in Warsaw when the Nazis invaded Poland and was forced into the ghetto in 1940. Despite surviving the horrors of the ghetto at the advanced age of 52, he was sent to a fate worse than death at the notorious death camp at Treblinka, which he immortalized in his memoirs."On his arrival at Treblinka aboard the Holocaust train from Warsaw, Wiernik was selected to work rather than be immediately killed. Wiernik's first job with the Sonderkommando required him to drag corpses from the gas chambers to mass graves. Wienik was traumatized by his experiences. He later wrote in his book: "It often happened that an arm or a leg fell off when we tied straps around them in order to drag the bodies away." He remembered the horrors of the enormous pyres, where "10,000 to 12,000 corpses were cremated at one time." He wrote: "The bodies of women were used for kindling" while Germans "toasted the scene with brandy and with the choicest liqueurs, ate, caroused and had a great time warming themselves by the fire." Wiernik described small children awaiting so long in the cold for their turn in the gas chambers that "their feet froze and stuck to the icy ground" and noted one guard who would "frequently snatch a child from the woman's arms and either tear the child in half or grab it by the legs, smash its head against a wall and throw the body away." At other times "children were snatched from their mothers' arms and tossed into the flames alive." "Wiernik escaped Treblinka during the revolt of the prisoners on "a sizzling hot day" of August 2, 1943. A shot fired into the air signalled that the revolt was on. Wiernik wrote that he "grabbed some guns" and, after spotting an opportunity to make a break for the woods, an axe..."

Kandahar In 1879: The Diary Of Major Le Messurier

by Major Augustus Le Messurier

A remarkable diary from the wars of the British Empire of the historic march on Kandahar in 1879.The Second Anglo-Afghan war 1878-1880 was intended to establish peace and British hegemony to the North-West frontiers of the Indian Empire. After the brutal and disastrous effort of the British to invade during the first war (1842) the Afghans would not be underestimated and remained dangerous on their own territory. The British, quick to realize that another reverse in this country would signal an end to their prestige and influence, organize a relief effort. Formed into three columns, the troops were well prepared and commanded by veteran generals, each setting out to pacify a different area of the country.Major Augustus Le Messurier was appointed brigade major of the Royal Artillery attached to the Kandahar Field Force, one of the invading columns under the command of Lt.-Gen. D. M. Stewart. The terrain that the Kandahar field force had to cover was among the toughest in the world, and constantly harassed by irregulars, hunger, cold they made Kandahar by dint of superhuman efforts.

Minden And The Seven Years War

by Sir Lees Knowles

During the Seven Years War, British troops had been committed sparingly to continental Europe, the English war effort being made overseas in conjunction with the preeminent Royal Navy. However in 1759 the British troops under Ferdinand of Brunswick would achieve a remarkable victory against the French army at the battle of Minden.The battle began with a duel of guns on the wings of the battleline; after an indecisive battering Ferdinand ordered the division containing the British regiments to advance. In a misunderstanding of their orders the British regiments advanced swiftly on the centre of the French army, which was held by cavalry. Battered at close range by French guns the British soldiers grimly held on despite repeated French cavalry charges; in an echo of Cressey the flower of French chivalry was laid low by dogged British vollies. Once Ferdinand saw the penetration of the French lines and the wrecked French cavalry he ordered a general advance which rapidly put the French army to flight earning one the greatest victories of the entire war.In this short volume written by the renowned historian Sir Lees Knowles, are recounted the valiant deeds of the six British regiments that smashed all before them, a victory that is commemorated to this day.

Lord Roberts Of Kandahar, V.C.: The Life-Story Of A Great Solider [Illustrated Edition]

by Walter Jerrold

Includes 9 illustrations"As a leader of men in the field he is, I believe, without equal." -- Sir Alfred Milner on Lord RobertsIn this excellent short biography of Lord Roberts, Walter Jerrold, tells the tale of his many exploits and victories across the British Empire."Roberts won the Victoria Cross at Khudagani during the Indian Mutiny (1857-59) for repeated acts of gallantry, but first came to public notice during the Second Afghan War (1878-80) when he commanded the Kurram Field Force, leading it to victory at Peiwar Kotal in December 1878, and later the Kabul Field Force which occupied the Afghan capital in October 1879 following the murder of the British envoy."Roberts also led his troops on the legendary march from Kabul to Kandahar. Despite the difficult terrain and the high temperatures he covered 280 miles (400km) in 20 days and hardly lost a man. In September 1880 he defeated Ayub Khan outside Kandahar and relieved the besieged garrison. "After the early reverses of the Boer War (1899-1902), Roberts took over command of the British forces in South Africa. From December 1899, together with his Chief of Staff Major-General Horatio Herbert, Lord Kitchener, he revitalised the British military effort. Kindly, unassuming and courteous, Roberts was popularly known as 'Bobs'. His small stature and elderly appearance - he was 68 when he left South Africa in 1900 - probably increased the veneration which he received from both the public and soldiers."On returning to Britain he was made a Knight of the Garter and created Earl Roberts. Despite a bitter rivalry with the Wolseley ring, Roberts was made the last Commander-in-Chief of the British Army, a position he held for three years until 1904.After lying in state in Westminster Hall, one of only two non-Royals to do so in the 20th century, the other being Winston Churchill, he was given a state funeral."--NAM

Reminiscences of Big I

by Bell Irwin Wiley Lieutenant William Nathaniel Wood

Pickett's charge at Gettysburg probably has been the theme of more writing than any other action of the Civil War. Common soldiers, nurses, surgeons, journalists, foreign observers, local residents and generals have all recounted their experiences and impressions. But relatively few company commanders who participated in that grand but futile assault have left a record of what they saw and did. Indeed, and especially on the Confederate side, the role of junior officers as told by themselves, constitutes a major gap in Civil War literature. Because of this fact, William Nathaniel Wood's reminiscences of Gettysburg and the dozen other major battles in which he participated is of considerably greater value than the usual memoir."Wood entered the Monticello Guard of Charlottesville, Co. A, Nineteenth Virginia Regiment, on July 20th, 1861, the evening before the first battle of Manassas, and had his 'baptism of fire' the next day. He was soon promoted to a Lieutenancy, and for much of the latter part of the war, was in command of the Company. At the battle of Gettysburg, after Captain Culin was wounded, he commanded the company, and led it to the stone wall, and what is more wonderful, he went back under the most terrific fire from the stone wall and on each flank. His clothing was riddled with shot, but he escaped with a slight scratch under one arm. Wood was, I think, in every encounter in which his company was engaged during the whole war, and he, with what was left of it, was captured at Tailor's Creek, April 6th, 1865, just three days before Lee's surrender."--C. C. Wertenbaker

FIRE BRIGADE: U.S. Marines In The Pusan Perimeter [Illustrated Edition]

by Captain John J. Chapin USMC

Includes over 30 maps, photos and illustrations.The Battle of Pusan Perimeter was a large-scale battle between United Nations and North Korean forces lasting from August 4 to September 18, 1950. It was one of the first major engagements of the Korean War. An army of 140,000 UN troops, having been pushed to the brink of defeat, were rallied to make a final stand against the invading North Korean army, 98,000 men strong.UN forces, having been repeatedly defeated by the advancing North Koreans, were forced back to the "Pusan Perimeter", a 140-mile (230 km) defensive line around an area on the southeastern tip of the Korean Peninsula that included the port of Pusan. The UN troops, consisting mostly of forces from the Republic of Korea (ROK), United States and United Kingdom, mounted a last stand around the perimeter, fighting off repeated North Korean attacks for six weeks as they were engaged around the cities of Taegu, Masan, and P'ohang, and the Naktong River. The massive North Korean assaults were unsuccessful in forcing the United Nations troops back further from the perimeter, despite two major pushes in August and September.North Korean troops, hampered by supply shortages and massive losses, continually staged attacks on UN forces in an attempt to penetrate the perimeter and collapse the line. However, the UN used the port to amass an overwhelming advantage in troops, equipment, and logistics, and its navy and air forces remained unchallenged by the North Koreans during the fight. After six weeks, the North Korean force collapsed and retreated in defeat after the UN force launched a counterattack at Inchon on September 15. The battle would be the furthest the North Korean troops would advance in the war, as subsequent fighting ground the war into a stalemate.

Union Artillery At The Battle Of Chickamauga

by Major Michael J. Mammay

Includes 23 plans and diagrams.This thesis examines the use of artillery by the Union Army of the Cumberland during the Battle of Chickamauga on 19 and 20 September, 1863. The thesis methodology is an analysis of the terrain, technology, tactics, organization for combat, and leadership during the battle. This thesis shows that the Union did not employ artillery effectively due to poor organization for combat and failure of leaders to use the weapons systems in accordance with their strengths. The failure to plan for artillery use on 20 September directly led to weakness on the left flank, which the Confederates exploited. The ensuing havoc led Union leaders to attempt to reorganize their artillery structure while in contact with the enemy, leading to predictable failure. This thesis shows the failure of artillery, a branch that was nearing the end of its relevance during the American Civil War due to technological change. As military thinkers today go through the process of redesigning the force, they can use the lessons of the artillery at as an example of the wrong way to employ a force at the end of its life cycle.

The U.S. Army Airborne Division, 1942 To 1945: Concept, Combat, And Evolution

by Timothy M. Clauss

In 1939, the U.S. Army had no formal combat formation capable of reaching the battlefield by air. In response to the success of German airborne operations, the U.S. Army formed a small unit of volunteers which was to experiment with airborne equipment and develop techniques. In the span of six years, the fledgling airborne concept expanded from a small platoon of parachute volunteers into five deployed airborne divisions composed of parachute and glider forces with a formal doctrine.This thesis examines the development of the airborne division through its employment in the Mediterranean and European Theaters of Operation, as these theaters employed four of the five U.S. airborne divisions during World War II. The doctrine, organization, and equipment of the airborne division changed significantly from its inception through the end of WWII. Personal influence, lessons learned from combat, and logistical limitations significantly affected the evolution of the airborne division.

The Army’s Sioux Campaign of 1876: Identifying the Horse as the Center of Gravity of the Sioux

by Major Mark V. Hoyt

During the first half of 1876 the Army conducted three expeditions against the Sioux and Cheyenne Indians. The results of these three expeditions were: the first expedition destroying a small village, the second expedition being defeated in a meeting engagement, and the third expedition suffering the annihilation of five companies. The results lead to questioning the Army's focus on attacking and destroying villages as the primary target of their expeditions. If the Army had a complete understanding of the Sioux they would have realized that the "hub of all power" or center of gravity of the Sioux was the horse, which every major aspect of Sioux life was augmented and dependent upon. The first three expeditions of the Sioux Campaign of 1876 demonstrate that: senior Army commanders planned their campaigns, expeditions, and organizations around their knowledge of Sioux mobility, the primary source of power for the Sioux warrior was mobility gained from the horse, Army forces could not bring their advantage in firepower to bear on Sioux warriors. Army commanders understood the mobility of the Sioux village and their warriors, but they failed to take the next step--challenging the old assumption that attacking villages and using a strategy of exhaustion was the correct way to subdue the Sioux. Instead, Army forces should have concentrated their attacks on center of gravity of the Sioux--the horse.

Earl Kitchener Of Khartoum: The Story Of His Life [Illustrated Edition]

by Walter Jerrold

Includes 8 illustrations.Field Marshal Horatio Kitchener, 1st Earl of Khartoum still stands as one of the great generals produced by Britain. His career was marked by great deeds, and great controversies. The son of a military family, he trained at the Royal Military Academy in Woolwich before his first trip to the Middle East surveying in Palestine in 1874. He joined the newly formed Egyptian Army in 1883, which was in reality controlled by the British, and embarked on campaign in Sudan. He was part of the failed Gordon relief expedition in 1884, and learned a great deal of the area, its people and the military problems of fighting in the arid desert. By 1892 he was Sirdar, head of the Egyptian army, he was given command of the expedition to crush the self-appointed Mahdi who had taken control of large parts of Sudan. It was during this campaign that he gained public and Royal attention after the victories of Atbara and Omdurman that crushed the revolt of the Mahdi.He served as Lord Robert's second in command during the Boer War and served with distinction and much success, although his institution of concentration camps caused great outrage and awful civilian distress. Perhaps his greatest services were during the First World War, as Secretary of State for War, fashioning a great civilian army to fight the militarised hordes of Germany in France and Flanders. He may have gained even greater fame, but was tragically lost at sea when the H.M.S. Hampshire was torpedoed in 1916.An excellent short biography.

The Tale Of The Indian Mutiny [Illustrated Edition]

by William Henry Fitchett

Illustrated with over one hundred maps, photos and portraits, of the battles, individuals and places involved in the Indian Mutiny.William Henry Fitchett was a prodigious author writing many books on British History, perhaps his most famous is his one volume history of the Indian Mutiny. Variously known as the Sepoy Revolt, or the First War of Indian Independence, it blazed a trail across northern India and its repercussions changed the British rule of India for the next century.The great East India Company had for many years grown its influence and that of its British masters across the sub-continent; the main tool for this expansion was the Sepoy regiments of native soldiers that they had welded into a formidable weapon of imperialism. However this transformation was heavy-handed, local customs were ignored, traditions unrespected and religious sensibilities ignored; the native Sepoys grew restless. The spark that lit the powderkeg of resentment was the issue of greased cartridges for the Sepoy's rifles; either greased with pork fat which enraged the Muslims in ranks, or greased with beef tallow appalling the Hindus. Outbreaks of insubordination turned bloody quickly, and led to risings not just of the soldiers but the civilians as well, uncontrollable mobs rent their frustrations in the most barbaric manner and laid siege of Cawnpore and Lucknow capturing Delhi itself. Once the shock had dissipated the British response was rapid, brutal and successful, reliving their besieged forces and crossing the rebels utterly.

The Tiger Of Malaya:: The Story Of General Tomoyuki Yamashita And “Death March” General Masaharu Homma [Illustrated Edition]

by Lt. Col. Aubrey Saint Kenworthy

Includes over 30 illustrationsAs in Nazi occupied countries that were liberated by the Allies, horrible crimes had been uncovered, perpetrated in the name of superior culture on defenceless civilians and prisoners of war. As the emaciated American, British, Australian soldiers emerged from the prisoner of war camps with barbaric tales of torture, mistreatment and neglect, it was clear that justice must be sought. The U.S. Military fixed on two Japanese generals who were foremost in causing and ordering these outrages, the conqueror of Malaya Tomoyuki Yamahsita and the notorious "Death March" Masaharu Homma.Lt. Col. Kenworthy was a member of the U.S. military police assigned to the Philippines and saw at first hand the military tribunal ordered at the express command of General MacArthur. He was detailed to guard both Yamashita and Homma during the trial and was able to view their reactions to the detailed evidence that was used against them. He was determined to write this account of this momentous event, he recorded not only the evidence of the crimes but also the stoic calm with which the two generals faced the weight of Allied Justice.A fascinating sidelight on the ending of the World War Two.

The Lost War:: A Japanese Reporter’s Inside Story [Illustrated Edition]

by Masuo Kato

Includes The Bombing Of Japan During World War II illustrations pack with 120 maps, plans, and photos"Masuo Kato, an American educated Japanese newspaper man, represented the Domei news agency in Washington from 1937 to 1941, was repatriated in the first exchange. and served thereafter in Domei head. quarters in Tokyo. This little book, written following Japan's surrender with the assistance of an American occupation officer, reflects the attitudes of the "Westernized" Japanese.The author indicates his skepticism over Japan's policies of aggression, but describes his own participation in her wartime propaganda machine. One cannot fail but question the degree to which such an individual now accepts American occupation policies.The book gives a graphic account of wartime conditions in Japan. It tells of the changes in political leadership, terminating in the maneuvering of figures around the Throne preceding unconditional surrender. Kato attributes the acceptance of defeat by the people in large measure to the Emperor's radio appeal for maintenance of order."-- John Masland, Dartmouth College

Give Us This Day [Illustrated Edition]

by Sidney Stewart

Includes The Prisoners Of War In Japanese Hands During World War Two pack with 130 photos, plans and photos.In Give Us This Day a young Oklahoman, a survivor of Bataan, reveals the terrible truth about a little-known aspect of the Pacific war as he experienced it from the beginning in the Philippines. He was a captive of the Japanese for more than three years; he knew one after another all the torments of confinement in conditions of primitive barbarism. True though his story is, it almost defies belief. With touching simplicity he recounts the stark and shocking details of one of the most shameful features of that war -- the treatment of American soldiers who fell into the hands of the Japanese. At first Stewart hated his captors, but in the end hatred gave place to a dawning comprehension that the Japanese were as different from us as the men of Genghis Khan."It is one of the most harrowing and debilitating chronicles that I have read. . . . He describes the ordeal brilliantly; he harbors no resentments apparently, and he has emerged from an inferno of bestiality with utter serenity." -- Maxwell Geismar, Saturday Review"An impressive and moving book." -- David Dempsey, New York Times"His is no ordinary prisoner-of-war story; better written than most, it contains no tales of swashbuckling defiance. . . . The force of this book is its testimony to the indomitable strength of the human spirit." -- Manchester Guardian"The plain narrative of this story would by itself have been fascinating, but this book is far more than a story, it is a work of art." -- André Siegfried, Academie Francaise"Sidney Stewart's composed narrative is one of the most noble documents ever penned by a prisoner of war. The companions he writes about remained men to the end, until at last only one man remained; he survived to write this unforgettable, this magnificent story." -- George Slocombe, New York Herald Tribune [Paris]

American Airpower Comes Of Age—General Henry H. “Hap” Arnold’s World War II Diaries Vol. II [Illustrated Edition]

by Maj.-Gen John W. Huston Gen. Henry H. “Hap.” Arnold

Includes the Aerial Warfare In Europe During World War II illustrations pack with over 180 maps, plans, and photos.Gen Henry H. "Hap." Arnold, US Army Air Forces (AAF) Chief of Staff during World War II, maintained diaries for his several journeys to various meetings and conferences throughout the conflict. Volume 1 introduces Hap Arnold, the setting for five of his journeys, the diaries he kept, and evaluations of those journeys and their consequences. General Arnold's travels brought him into strategy meetings and personal conversations with virtually all leaders of Allied forces as well as many AAF troops around the world. He recorded his impressions, feelings, and expectations in his diaries. Maj Gen John W. Huston, USAF, retired, has captured the essence of Henry H. Hap Arnold--the man, the officer, the AAF chief, and his mission. Volume 2 encompasses General Arnold's final seven journeys and the diaries he kept therein.

American Airpower Comes Of Age—General Henry H. “Hap” Arnold’s World War II Diaries Vol. I [Illustrated Edition]

by Maj.-Gen John W. Huston Gen. Henry H. “Hap.” Arnold

Includes the Aerial Warfare In Europe During World War II illustrations pack with over 180 maps, plans, and photos.Gen Henry H. "Hap." Arnold, US Army Air Forces (AAF) Chief of Staff during World War II, maintained diaries for his several journeys to various meetings and conferences throughout the conflict. Volume 1 introduces Hap Arnold, the setting for five of his journeys, the diaries he kept, and evaluations of those journeys and their consequences. General Arnold's travels brought him into strategy meetings and personal conversations with virtually all leaders of Allied forces as well as many AAF troops around the world. He recorded his impressions, feelings, and expectations in his diaries. Maj Gen John W. Huston, USAF, retired, has captured the essence of Henry H. Hap Arnold--the man, the officer, the AAF chief, and his mission. Volume 2 encompasses General Arnold's final seven journeys and the diaries he kept therein.

DRIVE NORTH - U.S. Marines At The Punchbowl [Illustrated Edition]

by Colonel Allan R. Millett USMC

Includes over 30 maps, photos and illustrationsThe Battle of the Punchbowl, was one of the last battles of the movement phase of the Korean War. Following the breakdown of armistice negotiations in August 1951, the United Nations Command decided to launch a limited offensive in the late summer/early autumn to shorten and straighten sections of their lines, acquire better defensive terrain, and deny the enemy key vantage points from which they could observe and target UN positions. The Battle of Bloody Ridge took place west of the Punchbowl from August-September 1951 and this was followed by the Battle of Heartbreak Ridge northwest of the Punchbowl from September-October 1951. At the end of the UN offensive in October 1951, UN Forces controlled the line of hills north of the Punchbowl.

The Hunter: Autobiography Of The Man Who Spent Fifteen Years Searching For Adolf Eichmann

by David C. Gross Tuviah Friedman

THE SEARCH...THE CAPTURE...AND THE TRIAL OF HISTORY'S BLOODIEST MURDERER, ADOLF EICHMANN -- BY THE MAN WHO TRACKED HIM DOWNTuviah Friedman-The Hunter of Adolf EichmannHere is the extraordinary story of the famous hunter who spent fifteen years searching for Adolf Eichmann, one of the most ruthless criminals the world has known. When the first Soviet troops entered Poland, young Tuviah Friedman, who had lost most of his family and seen many of his friends beaten to death, knew his chance to revenge himself on the Nazis was at hand. After his escape from a concentration camp, Friedman joined Polish security force charged with rounding up former commandants of slave labor and ghettos, and became a precocious and highly successful Nazi hunter. Had he not encountered anti-Semitic prejudices among the Poles, he might have remained in Poland and entered the new government that was then being formed. Instead, he proceeded to Vienna where he began his fifteen years search for Eichmann--a searchwhose final chapter began to unfold in October, 1959. The rest is history. Tuviah Friedman's story is the authentic account of the search for Adolf Eichmann. Friedman has documents, never known to exist, and has witnessed and participated in the crucial events of this story."An enthralling detective story and a self-portrayal of one man's terrifying obsession."--Life Magazine"Eccentric? Fanatic? Dedicated Man? He is all three but his book is a fascinating one..."--The New York Times

The Strategic Air War Against Germany and Japan: A Memoir

by Major General Haywood S. Hansell Jr. USAF

This book seeks to recount the air experience and development before World War II, to describe the objectives, plans and effects of strategic air warfare in Europe and in the Pacific, and to offer criticism, opinion, and lessons of that great conflict.MAJOR GENERAL HAYWOOD S. HANSELL, JR., USAF (Retired), is a native of Atlanta, Georgia. A graduate of Georgia Institute of Technology (1924), he entered the U.S. Army Air Corps in 1928. Trained as a fighter pilot, he flew in the Air Corps Aerobatic and Demonstration Team (1932) led by Captain Claire Chennault. In the mid-1930s Hansell specialized in strategic bombardment, teaching tactics and doctrine at the Air Corps Tactical School from 1935 to 1938. Just prior to World War II, he went to Army Air Forces Headquarters where he helped draft the fundamental war requirements plan for the service. In 1942 he became Commanding General, Third Bombardment Wing (B-26s), Eighth Air Force, in the European Theater. Subsequently General Hansell commanded the First Bombardment Division (B-17s), Eighth Air Force, and in 1944-45 the XXI Bomber Command (B-29s), Twentieth Air Force, in the Pacific. The latter command was one of only two long-range B-29 commands conducting strategic air warfare against Japan. In 1946 he retired, suffering from a physical disability. During the Korean War (1950-53), the Chief of Staff, U.S. Air Force recalled him to active duty, assigning him as Chief, Military Assistance Program Headquarters, USAF, and subsequently as Air Member Review Board, Weapons Systems Evaluation Group, reporting to the Assistant Secretary of Defense, Research and Development and to the Joint Chiefs of Staff. After four years as a senior program manager and advisor, General Hansell retired again. He is the author of The Air Plan That Defeated Hitler (1972) and Strategic Air War Against Japan (1980).

Flank Defense In Far-Reaching Operations [Illustrated Edition]

by Generaloberst Heinz Guderian

Includes the World War Two On The Eastern Front (1941-1945) Illustration Pack - 198 photos/illustrations and 46 maps.Often written during imprisonment in Allied War camps by former German officers, with their memories of the World War fresh in their minds, The Foreign Military Studies series offers rare glimpses into the Third Reich. In this study the father of the Panzerarmeen, Generaloberst Heinz Guderian discusses how he and his tanks attained such success in Russia.Focussing on the Second Panzer Army's, which he commanded during 1941, General Guderian discusses the actions for the offensive over the Bug, the crossing of the Dnepr, the attack at Smolensk, the thrust at Kiev, the breakthrough at Orel-Bryansk and the operations around Tula.

The German Defense Of Berlin

by Generaloberst a.D. Franz Halder Oberst a.D. Wilhem Willemar

Often written during imprisonment in Allied War camps by former German officers, with their memories of the World War fresh in their minds, The Foreign Military Studies series offers rare glimpses into the Third Reich. In this study Oberst a.D. Wilhem Willemar discusses his recollections of the climatic battle for Berlin from within the Wehrmacht."No cohesive, over-all plan for the defense of Berlin was ever actually prepared. All that existed was the stubborn determination of Hitler to defend the capital of the Reich. Circumstances were such that he gave no thought to defending the city until it was much too late for any kind of advance planning. Thus the city's defense was characterized only by a mass of improvisations. These reveal a state of total confusion in which the pressure of the enemy, the organizational chaos on the German side, and the catastrophic shortage of human and material resources for the defense combined with disastrous effect."The author describes these conditions in a clear, accurate report which I rate very highly. He goes beyond the more narrow concept of planning and offers the first German account of the defense of Berlin to be based upon thorough research. I attach great importance to this study from the standpoint of military history and concur with the military opinions expressed by the author."-Foreword by Generaloberst a.D. Franz Halder.

Stirring Incidents in the Life of a British Soldier: An Autobiography [Illustrated Edition]

by Colour-Sergeant Thomas Faughnan

[Illustrated with over two hundred and sixty maps, photos and portraits, of the battles, individuals and places involved in the Crimean War]Thomas Faughnan served in the 6th Royal Regiment, now the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, during a most bloody period of British History. Born in Derry in Ireland, he enlisted in the British Army to escape poverty and deprivation; his was destined to be a hard life of soldiering. His memoirs abound with details of the dull and brutal life of the private soldier on marches and in barracks in England before his first major service abroad in the Crimea. Colour-Sergeant Faughnan, as he had risen in the ranks, served with distinction at the siege of Sebastopol amongst the snow and disease. He writes movingly of the desperate conditions that the average ranker suffered and fought under in Russia and of the heroic engagements at Balaklava and the assault of the Redan. The author survived to see further action in Egypt before eventual retirement in Canada.A little-known but brilliant memoir from the ranks of the British Army.

Showing 3,401 through 3,425 of 26,532 results

Help

Select your format based upon: 1) how you want to read your book, and 2) compatibility with your reading tool. To learn more about using Bookshare with your device, visit the Help Center.

Here is an overview of the specialized formats that Bookshare offers its members with links that go to the Help Center for more information.

  • Bookshare Web Reader - a customized reading tool for Bookshare members offering all the features of DAISY with a single click of the "Read Now" link.
  • DAISY (Digital Accessible Information System) - a digital book file format. DAISY books from Bookshare are DAISY 3.0 text files that work with just about every type of access technology that reads text. Books that contain images will have the download option of ‘DAISY Text with Images’.
  • BRF (Braille Refreshable Format) - digital Braille for use with refreshable Braille devices and Braille embossers.
  • MP3 (Mpeg audio layer 3) - Provides audio only with no text. These books are created with a text-to-speech engine and spoken by Kendra, a high quality synthetic voice from Ivona. Any device that supports MP3 playback is compatible.
  • DAISY Audio - Similar to the Daisy 3.0 option above; however, this option uses MP3 files created with our text-to-speech engine that utilizes Ivonas Kendra voice. This format will work with Daisy Audio compatible players such as Victor Reader Stream and Read2Go.