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Quantico Rules

by Gene Riehl

Hailed by Michael Connelly as "a thriller that is good till the last page," ex-FBI agent Gene Riehl's suspense-charged debut novel takes readers inside the national security organization and introduces rogue G-man hero Puller Monk FBI agent Puller Monk and his Special Inquiries (SPIN) squad figure their latest assignment--a background check on the 1st African American female Supreme Court nominee--will be a routine investigation. But when verifying information about Federal Judge Brenda Thompson, it becomes clear that she's lying about a 3-week gap in her past that occurred between college and law school. Her old roommate could provide answers, but she's missing. Soon, Monk has a dead body on his hands, and he and Special Agent Lisa Sands are plunged into a maelstrom of deceit, corruption, and murder that reaches the highest levels of government. Monk is determined to blow the lid off a massive cover-up, but he may not be able to contain the fallout as the truth starts to emerge. Amid escalating violence, the FBI agent orchestrates a sting that will force a killer from the shadows--a cunning adversary who has his own plan for taking out Monk.

Horror Show

by Greg Kihn

A Bram Stoker Award finalist for Best First Novel: This endlessly inventive thriller pays homage to 1950s Hollywood horror films--with a demonic twist Schlock horror director Landis Woodley lives in a decaying mansion in the Hollywood Hills. When he abandoned the movie business--after being reduced to filming skin flicks and peep shows--he also left a laundry list of enemies, including the IRS. But avid fan Clint Stockbern is determined to write a piece on the alcoholic recluse for Monster magazine. Woodley agrees to the interview--for $600 in cash. As the tape recorder starts rolling, Stockbern travels back in time with Woodley. He hears recollections of Attack of the Haunted Saucer, the worst movie of all time, and Blood Ghouls of Malibu. But he really wants to know about Woodley's masterpiece, Cadaver. Shot on location in the Los Angeles County morgue, the film was rumored to have used real corpses and everyone associated with the production has been fatally haunted since its 1957 release. But the truth is far more terrifying than Stockbern imagined. Is a dead Satanist, possessed by the devil, reaching out beyond the grave? Or is the reporter the final victim in a diabolical scheme dreamed up by mortals? Horror Show is a wild and wacky romp that sends up mid-century Hollywood horror movies and schlockmeisters Roger Corman, William Castle, and Ed Wood.

Shade of Pale

by Greg Kihn

When the banshee wails, you must listen . . . Manhattan psychiatrist Jukes Wahler first spies her through a deli window: a stunning redheaded beauty who turns to look at him before she vanishes down the street. Then a patient tells him about a woman who's been stalking him, convinced that she's the banshee, the Irish angel of death. She's young, beautiful . . . and has red hair. It must be a coincidence, right? After all, the patient is dangerously delusional. But Wahler soon has other things to worry about. His sister, Cathy, and her abusive boyfriend are missing, and his only lead is Padraic O'Connor, an ex-IRA commando and the leader of one of Northern Ireland's most radical terrorist groups, who will offer his help--for a price. Filled with larger-than-life characters, including a jaded cop with no patience for the paranormal, a beautiful professor who specializes in Irish mythology, and a centuries-old protector of the innocent, Shade of Pale tells a fast-paced story of fate, vengeance, and love.

Faithful Are the Wounds

by May Sarton

A professor's suicide is the catalyst for this novel about politics and ideals set at Harvard during the 1950s When Harvard professor Edward Cavan commits suicide by throwing himself under a subway train, his death sets off shock waves both across campus and in the hearts of his loved ones. To Edward's estranged sister, Isabel, her brother represented the dangers she sought to escape through the security of marriage. His student George Hastings saw in Edward the father he wished he had. Damon Phillips shared Edward's idealistic beliefs --until his fear of being branded a Communist caused him to betray his friend. And Ivan Goldberg knew Edward as a man who would rather die than compromise his beliefs. Through the eyes of those he touched, Edward comes alive again, and we begin to understand who he is and what he stands for. With a title that is a metaphor for the embattled lives of 1950s liberals, Faithful Are the Wounds is about what it means to be American and human in a world that can affect us on the most profound spiritual and ideological levels. It is about how much we are willing to sacrifice for our freedom, and what happens when our values are destroyed.

The Birth of a Grandfather

by May Sarton

May Sarton's 7th novel is about marriage, family, life's cycles, and the regeneration of love Frances and Sprig Wyeth have come to the old Wyeth house in Maine for the summer. In a house filled with lively members of her husband's extended family, Frances feels alienated from everyone, including Sprig. A night of passion breaks down the growing barriers between them, yet Frances feels it is more a "desperate moment of possession" than the true "flowing together of two deeply joined selves." And although she's the mother of two grown children, in many ways she still feels like a child, waiting to mature into adulthood. Sprig adores his wife. But now, at 50, he both wants her and wants her to leave. He longs for freedom and is haunted by memories of his youth. His son, Caleb, is hostile; his unmarried daughter, Betsy, is pregnant. Sprig feels as if he is "walking in the dark," and has begun to doubt himself as a husband, father, and friend. The Birth of a Grandfather is the story of a marriage and a family, of friendship and the love that reminds us that we are alive and that we matter. It's about the small domestic moments and the defining events that make up a life.

Shadow of a Man

by May Sarton

A Harvard grad student falls in love with an older woman in this beautifully written novel set in Paris Francis Chabrier is a 26-year-old graduate student still looking for direction when his mother dies. The reverberations of her sudden demise are deeply felt within her family circle and in the lives of her friends. Francis's stepfather, Alan, is devastated--but Francis only feels angry and adrift. Everyone expects him to marry his childhood friend Ann. Instead, he leaves Boston for Paris, where he spent the first 12 years of his life. Here, in the City of Lights, he hopes to find purpose and meaning--and Solange Bernard. Solange is an old friend of Francis's mother. As a boy, Francis was captivated by the vivacious French beauty, and now he has traveled to France to see if she is as he remembers. The woman he meets is no longer young, nor is she all that beautiful. But when Francis is with her, the years between them disappear. Soon they are swept into a passionate affair that opens up a world of tantalizing possibility . . . and changes Francis in ways he never imagined. A novel about the journey of self-discovery, Shadow of a Man tells a tender and honest story about first love that will resonate with readers of every age.

Encore

by May Sarton

May Sarton discovers the liberation of old age in this life-affirming journal On the second day of her 80th year, May Sarton began a new journal. She wrote it because she wanted "to go on a little while longer;" to discover "what is really happening to me." This triumphant sequel to Endgame--Sarton's journal of her 79th year--is filled with the comforting minutiae of daily life, from gardening to planning dinners and floral arrangements to answering fan mail. The wonderful thing about getting older, Sarton writes, is "the freedom to be absurd, the freedom to forget things . . . the freedom to be eccentric." Her other octogenarian pleasures include preparing for holidays and weddings, lunches with old friends and new admirers, the heady delight of critical recognition, and the rebirth of her lyric voice as she creates new poems. Yet Sarton knows that age can also bring pain and ill health, as well as a deepening awareness of the "perilousness of life on all sides, knowing that at any moment something frightful may happen."

Endgame

by May Sarton

As she battles debilitating illnesses, May Sarton looks back on her life, cherishes new and old friendships, and finds hope in the brave new world of old age "I always imagined a journal that would take me through my seventy-ninth year," May Sarton writes, "the doors opening out from old age to unknown efforts and surprises." Instead of musing calmly on the philosophical implications of aging, the writer found herself spending most of her energy battling for her health. Coping with constant pain and increasing frailty, Sarton fears that the end is not far off. The story of what she calls the "last laps of a long-distance runner," this yearlong journal addresses such familiar Sarton topics as her beloved garden, the harshness of Maine winters, and the friendships and intimate relationships that have nurtured and sustained her. She settles some old literary scores and paints a generous portrait of Virginia Woolf, who often shared tea with Sarton during the late 1930s. When illness saps Sarton's ability to type, she dictates into recorders and has the tapes transcribed by devoted assistants. In spite of the loss of independence and the fear that she will never fully recover, she does her best to soldier on, taking pleasure in small things like a good meal; her cat, Pierrot, who loves the rain; and being able to sleep through the night. An enduring inspiration to millions of women, Sarton even finds the courage to achieve again.

World War II Partisan Warfare in Italy

by Pier Battistelli

When Italy surrendered in 1943, it sparked a diverse resistance movement of anti-German, anti-fascist partisans who rose up against German occupation. This book explores the tactics, organizational structure and equipment of the brave Italian resistance fighters, who knew exactly what was at stake when operating against their German occupiers. Beginning with low-level sabotage and assassinations, the groups grew until spring 1944 when they numbered around 100,000, and as the Allies advanced to the Gothic line, a remarkable, unified partisan command structure was created. The partisans began to work in close co-ordination with the Allies, receiving British SOE and American OSS liaison teams as well as supplies of weapons. The German response was eye-watering in its ferocity and brutality, as the SS and Italian RSI looked to eradicate the partisans once and for all when the Allied advance stalled in Autumn 1944. But when the Allies made their final breakthrough in the last weeks of the war the partisans rose in force to pile the pressure on the retreating Wehrmacht. From an expert on Italian military history in World War II, this work provides an exhaustively researched, sumptuously illustrated guide to the men and women who fought a desperate struggle against occupation, as well as the German and Italian fascist security forces unleashed against them.

Attila the Hun

by Nic Fields Steve Noon

Attila the Hun is one of the iconic figures of history. In a series of epic campaigns dating from the AD 430s till his death in AD 453 he ravaged first the Eatsern Roman Empire and later the Western Roman Empire, invading Italy itself in AD 452 threatening Rome itself.The Huns had moved into Europe in the AD 370s, annexing the territory of the Alans and settling in the Danube region. In AD 433 Rua King of the Huns, died. Rua, an ally of Aetius and the West Romans, was succeeded by his nephews Bleda and Attila. When Attila murdered his brother and ruled alone things began to change. In two campaigns against the Eastern Empire (AD 441-42 and 447) the Huns devastated the Balkans and exacted a heavy tribute. In AD 450 Attila turned his attention to the West. When Attila crossed the Rhine he met very little resistance. Some towns opened their gates to him, others were captured and sacked including Trier, Metz and Reims. Attila's strategy was to keep moving, thereby reducing his logistical problems and, by his devastation of Roman Gaul, force the Western Empire to come to terms with him. He met his major setback at the battle of Chalons in AD 451, also known as the battle of Campus Mauriacus or Catalaunian Plains, when the Roman warlord Flavius Aetius cobble together a hodgepodge force of Visigoths, Franks, Burgundians, Alans, Saxons, Armorican Britons and Romans who together they managed to drive Attila the Hun out of France by defeating his equally mixed army of Huns, Ostrogoths, Gepids, Franks, Rugians, Thuringians, Burgundians.Despite this setback, Attila invaded Italy the following year, sacking and razing the cities of Aquileia, Vicetia, Verona, Brixia, Bergamum and Milan. Having retired to his Carpathian heartland, Attila died in AD 453 and his empire did not long survive him.This new study explores his extraordinary conquests and the abilities that led him to his establish such a far-flung empire.

Guadalcanal 1942-43

by Peter Dennis Mark Stille

The Guadalcanal campaign began with an amphibious assault in August 1942 - the US's first attempt to take the fight to the Japanese. It quickly escalated into a desperate attritional battle on land, air and sea, and by the time the Japanese had evacuated the last of their forces from the island in 1943, it was clear that the tide of the war had turned. The previously inexorable Japanese advance had been halted, and the myth of Japanese invincibility shattered. The fighting brought into sharp relief several crucial weaknesses of Japanese strategic planning and war economy, while the US was able to hone its Marine forces into the finest of points - ready for the devastating island-hopping campaign that would bring the war to Japan's doorstep. In this new study of the campaign, Pacific War expert Mark Stille draws on both US and Japanese sources to give a balanced and comprehensive account of a crucial, brutal conflict. Analyzing the three Japanese attempts to retake the island in the face of ferocious, and ultimately successful, American resistance, this book shows how the battle was won and lost, and how it would affect the outcome of the Pacific War as a whole.

A-10 Thunderbolt II Units of Operation Enduring Freedom 2008-14

by Jim Laurier Gary Wetzel

The untold story of A-10 units in Operation Enduring Freedom reaches its conclusion with this second of two volumes focusing on the type's combat missions in Afghanistan. Featuring numerous first-hand accounts and photography from those who experienced the conflict, along with imagery from official military archives, this book offers a unique and detailed insight into the record of the A-10 in one of the 21st Century's most significant conflicts.Initially, the A-10 Thunderbolt was not a favorite of the USAF, which, prior to the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait in 1990, was hoping to shunt this Cold War relic onto the US Army and Marine Corps. But since then, the 'Warthog', with its formidable armament, ruggedness and flexibility, has continually proven itself in combat and evolved into the world's premiere close support aircraft. In 2002 the Thunderbolt was at the forefront of Operation Enduring Freedom, the US occupation of Afghanistan.

Moosewood Restaurant New Classics

by Moosewood Collective

Not since their phenomenally successful Moosewood Restaurant Low-Fat Favorites has Ithaca, New York's, famed Moosewood Collective assembled such a comprehensive and appealing group of recipes -- all brand-new. Crowd-pleasing fare like Moosewood Muffins, savory risottos, satisfying main-dish salads, and two dozen one-dish meals are just some of the standout recipes in this indispensable collection of easy-to-make dishes. From breakfast to snacks, quick dinners and showstopping entreés to homey desserts, these are recipes cooks will reach for time and again.As always, Moosewood Collective's enticing, flavorful fare draws on a diversity of culinary traditions. The flavors of Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Americas make for food that is up-to-date and exciting.Complete with fascinating bits of multicultural food lore, time-saving tips, and interesting side notes gleaned from The Collective's many years as culinary pioneers, Moosewood Restaurant New Classics is an essential resource for every contemporary cook.

Moosewood Restaurant Book of Desserts

by Moosewood Collective

Frequent visitors to the renowned Moosewood Restaurant know to leave room for one of the enticing offerings on the daily dessert board: comforting bread puddings and cobblers, rich poundcakes and cheesecakes, luscious seasonal fruit desserts, and pies of all descriptions. All these and more can be found in Moosewood Restaurant Book of Desserts, a comprehensive collection of the most popular and tempting desserts created by Moosewood chefs over the past two decades. Here are desserts for every occasion, from the awesome, multi-tiered Festive Celebrations Cake to quick little cookies and muffins to slip into a lunch box or onto a tea tray. There are sumptuous low-fat favorites like Chocolate Cherry Clafouti and Pear Meringue Tart, easy home-style desserts including Gingerbread Cupcakes and Dark Chocolate Pudding with Bananas, and helpful lists of vegan desserts, children's favorites, and last-minute options (when a minor miracle is in order). As always, each recipe has been carefully tested and retested by the cooks at Moosewood to help ensure consistent results every time. Quick to prepare and made with readily available ingredients, the recipes in Moosewood Restaurant Book of Desserts are the kind of satisfyingly down-to-earth, mouth-watering treats you'll enjoy making for friends and family (and yourself) time and time again.

Moosewood Restaurant Low-Fat Favorites

by Moosewood Collective

This is the low-fat book cooks who care about wholesome, vegetarian-inspired food have been waiting for. Each of the more than 280 recipes are as delicious and trustworthy as those in the Moosewood Collective's previous books, and vibrant flavors and generous portions are still a hallmark of every dish. Because the Collective's primary goal is always to make great tasting food they resisted the notion of doing a low-fat book until they were convinced they could make low-fat dishes as flavor-packed as their regular favorites. "We've mostly been interested in gourmet cuisine at Moosewood Restaurant, not deprivation diet food," say the authors. "So, it's a happy surprise that the dishes we created for this cookbook don't come off as merely healthful diet foods. The food is exciting, ethnically diverse, and satisfyingly delicious. Moosewood Restaurant Low-fat Favorites is as much a celebration of the pleasures of eating as it is about low-fat cooking."In Moosewood Restaurant Low-fat Favorites the Collective emphasizes a few changes in basic cooking techniques to apply to everyday recipes and they offer tips and ideas for sustaining a low-fat lifestyle. They bake rather than fry, replace high-fat ingredients with healthy substitutes (no artificial ingredients allowed!), and use butter and oil very moderately. What is lost in fat is gained in bold, intense flavors. "When fashioning low-fat recipes, taking a nip here, a tuck there, we sometimes need to add a little embroidery, an embellishment such as extra herbs, spices, fruit or vegetable purée, vinegar, sun-dried tomatoes, dried mushrooms, miso, soy sauce, or garlic," explain the cooks at Moosewood Restaurant. "Our gingerbread gets extra flavor and moisture from chunks of pear rather than from butter and egg yolks. Two small calamata olives enliven the Caesar Salad Dressing. A little sauerkraut adds interest to an Italian mushroom stew."Fat will not be missed in mouthwatering recipes like Guacamole with Asparagus, Chinese Orzo Vegetable Salad, Spring Vegetable Paella, Indian Potato Pancakes, and Creamy Dairyless Rice Pudding. Along with those creative dishes, one of the most appealing parts of Moosewood Restaurant Low-fat Favorites is finding low-fat variations on familiar favorites such as Macaroni and Cheese, Shephard's Pie, and Dark Chocolate Pudding. An added bonus is that the Moosewood Collective has made sure that the ingredients used in the recipes throughout the book are very accessible--easily found in most well-stocked supermarkets. In the nutritional, glossary, and guide sections of Moosewood Restaurant Low-fat Favorites the Collective gives explanations of nutritional terms, instructions for how to glean the information you need from nutrition labels, a brief overview of vitamins and minerals, and guides to ingredients and cooking techniques. These three important sections, combined with the deliciously appetizing recipes, are a wealth of encouragement for low-fat eating and living a healthy lifestyle. The fourteen chapters range from savory soups and main course salads to creative side dishes and aromatic Mediterranean and Asian-inspired dishes. With chapters which range from healthy breakfasts and lunch foods to a collection of fish recipes and more than twenty truly delectable desserts, Moosewood Restaurant Low-fat Favorites is sure to set the kitchen standard not only for health-conscious cooks, but also for those who have come to rely on the Moosewood Collective's easy, earthy approach to cooking.

Deep Night

by Kathy Clark

Sure to thrill readers of Nora Roberts and Karen Robards, the breathtaking Denver Heroes series from New York Times bestselling author Kathy Clark continues as two adrenaline junkies find themselves fighting unexpected passion--and unspeakable terror. Ex-soldier Chris Wilson lost too many friends to war. Back home in Denver, he's trying to make a difference as a paramedic, treating victims of crisis situations. Not even active combat could prepare Chris for the rush he gets when violence and tragedy collide, but the job isn't the only thing making his heart race. His partner is his closest confidant from childhood, and the girl he remembers is now a strong, sensual woman . . . who needs him more than ever. Sara Richards is more comfortable risking her life than asking for help. The petite blonde medic put a wall around her heart long ago, vowing to never let anyone hurt her again. Only now her long-buried secrets threaten to destroy everything she's built. And though she should be able to trust Chris, his smoldering blue-gray eyes ignite desires that feel more dangerous than whatever's lurking in the shadows. For once, Sara can't go it alone. But Chris might just be stubborn enough to stand by her side as she faces down her worst nightmare.Advance praise for Deep Night "A deeply touching story of a woman's profound healing, and the amazing man who's with her every step of the way."--USA Today bestselling author Tina Wainscott Includes a special message from the editor, as well as an excerpt from another Loveswept title.

After the Stroke

by May Sarton

An intimate and uplifting memoir chronicling May Sarton's efforts to regain her health, art, and sense of self after suffering from a stroke Feeling cut off and isolated--from herself most of all--after suffering a stroke at age 73, May Sarton began a journal that helped her along the road to recovery. She wrote every day without fail, even if illness sometimes prevented her from penning more than a few lines. From her sprawling house off the coast of Maine, Sarton shares the quotidian details of her life in the aftermath of what her doctors identified as a small brain hemorrhage. What they did not tell her was the effect it would have on her life and work. Sarton's journal is filled with daily accounts of the weather, her garden, beloved pets, and her concerns about losing psychic energy and no longer feeling completely whole. A woman who had always prized her solitude, Sarton experiences feelings of intense loneliness. When overwhelmed by the past, she tries to find comfort in soothing remembrances of her travels, and struggles to learn to live moment by moment. As Sarton begins to regain her strength, she rejoices in the life "recaptured and in all that still lies ahead." Interspersed with heartfelt recollections about fellow poets and aspiring writers who see in Sarton a powerful muse, this is a wise and moving memoir about life after illness.

May Sarton

by May Sarton

This transcript from the film World of Light: A Portrait of May Sarton illuminates the life and writing of the poet while celebrating the joys of creativity, love, and solitude In June of 1979, May Sarton answered the questions of two filmmakers and read to them from her poetry. This four-day "jam session" ultimately became an acclaimed documentary about her life and work. For Sarton, the muse has always been female, and the writer says that her own poems "tell me where to go." In this rare and inspiring window into a singular woman's soul, Sarton speaks candidly about everything from how a single image opened the door to writing about her mother to the importance of transparency in art and life. She shares insights into her very personal art, including the unusual people and events that provide inspiration, how creativity can grow out of pain, solitude as a two-edged sword, the difficulties of being a female poet, and the ways love can open "the door into one's own secret and . . . frightening real self." Featuring sections entitled "On Inner Space," "On Nature," and "On Love," this revealing volume is also about the need go on, even when up against overwhelming odds. May Sarton: A Self-Portrait pays tribute to an artist's vision and serves as a revealing window into a fascinating life.

Writings on Writing

by May Sarton

May Sarton's lifetime of work as a poet, novelist, and essayist inform these illuminating reflections on the creative life In "The Book of Babylon," May Sarton remarks that she is not a critic--except of her own work. The essay addresses questions that have haunted Sarton's own creative practice, such as the concept of "tension in equilibrium"--balancing past and present, idea and image. She also cites poems written by others to describe the joy of writing and how we must give ourselves over to becoming the instruments of our art. "The Design of a Novel" is about fiction writing--where ideas come from, how theme and character determine plot, the mistakes many fledgling authors make, and how and why the novel differs from the poem. Further texts examine the act of composing verse, one's state of mind when writing poetry, the role of the unconscious, how revising is the loftiest form of creation, and how to keep growing as an artist. Throughout the collection, Sarton also warns about the dangers of trying to analyze the creative process too closely. A book that doesn't separate art from the artist's life, Writings on Writing is filled with Sarton's trademark imagery and insights, letting us know we're in the hands of a master.

Getting Away with Murder

by Howard Engel

Benny Cooperman is a detective with flair--a witty, egg-salad-loving, gentlemanly Jewish detective with a pronounced squeamishness when things get violent. In his most baffling case yet, Cooperman is snugly tucked in his bed in quiet Grantham, a Canadian town near Niagara Falls, when three unsavory thugs drag him out and present him like a trophy to notorious crime boss Abram Wise. Someone has made two attempts on the gangster's life, and with no one else to turn to, he wants Cooperman to investigate. Author Howard Engel has once again assembled a colorful cast that includes Wise's two disgruntled ex-wives, an alluring supermodel, an irate foreign car dealer, and an eccentric retired librarian. In an intricately woven plot that mixes past and present, murder and Middle Eastern food, fashion and auto repair, Cooperman finds himself entangled in more corruption, vengeance, and intrigue than one could ever imagine existing in a sleepy little village.

There Was an Old Woman

by Howard Engel

It all starts with a noisy toilet. Benny Cooperman's janitor, Kogan, is preoccupied with the demise of his elderly girlfriend, Lizzy Oldridge, who appears to have starved to death. Cooperman agrees to attend the inquest if Kogan will look into the plumbing. Lizzy may have died hungry, but she had plenty of money, and somehow the former alderman and mayoral candidate Thurleigh Ramsden, an unsavory character if there ever was one, has gained control of it. Ramsden escapes the inquest with his reputation intact, but Cooperman finds himself hopelessly enmeshed in the posthumous troubles of Kogan's late love. By the end of this twisting, turning tale, the body count will have increased alarmingly--but will Cooperman and Kogan solve the mystery of the defective plumbing?

Dead and Buried

by Howard Engel

When truck driver Jack Dowden is killed in an accident hauling toxic waste, his widow, Irma, suspects something fishy. Dowden wasn't the type to be careless, and Irma has reason to believe that someone may have wanted him dead. Naturally, Benny Cooperman is the man she calls to take the case. It's up to Cooperman to solve the mystery of Dowden's death--before the situation proves hazardous to the detective's health. Cooperman's a detective with flair. Kinder and gentler than your average PI--and ironically squeamish about violence--he's the creation of author Howard Engel, a master of the crime genre whose enthusiastic fans have included Ruth Rendell, Donald E. Westlake, Julian Symons, and Tony Hillerman. Engel's readership spans 13 countries, including Japan, England, Germany, Italy, Spain, Denmark, the United States, and his native Canada.

A Victim Must Be Found

by Howard Engel

To say that Canadian private investigator Benny Cooperman is a novice in the art world would be an understatement. Nevertheless, he's hired by Pambos Kiriakis, the manager of Grantham's poshest hotel, to track down some valuable works that went missing while on loan from a local gallery. But while Cooperman is hobnobbing with the art-collecting glitterati, things take a deadly turn. His client is stabbed, and a peculiar clue is left in a coffee cup at the crime scene. But who would want to kill Kiriakis? And could a painting really drive someone to murder? Benny Cooperman's a detective with flair. Kinder and gentler than your average PI--and ironically squeamish about violence--he's the creation of author Howard Engel, a master of the crime genre whose enthusiastic fans have included Ruth Rendell, Donald E. Westlake, Julian Symons, and Tony Hillerman. Engel's readership spans 13 countries, including Japan, England, Germany, Italy, Spain, Denmark, the United States, and his native Canada.

A City Called July

by Howard Engel

When a trusted lawyer runs off with the savings of more than 50 clients, totaling around $2 million, Rabbi Meltzer and Saul Tepperman of the B'nai Shalom synagogue in Grantham, Ontario, know Benny Cooperman's just the man to track down the funds. Tepperman has known the detective since Cooperman's bar mitzvah, so the sleuth isn't in a position to turn down the request for help. This summer is bound to be a real scorcher, and the heat will be on Cooperman to solve the case. Cooperman's a detective with flair. Kinder and gentler than your average PI--and ironically squeamish about violence--he's the creation of author Howard Engel, a master of the crime genre whose enthusiastic fans have included Ruth Rendell, Donald E. Westlake, Julian Symons, and Tony Hillerman. Engel's readership spans 13 countries, including Japan, England, Germany, Italy, Spain, Denmark, the United States, and his native Canada.

Murder Sees the Light

by Howard Engel

Benny Cooperman is camped out at the Petawawa fishing lodge watching over a famous televangelist who has gone into hiding while waiting for a court decision. It seems like a simple assignment--that is, until the lifeless body of missing Indian guide Aeneas DuFond is found. Suddenly Cooperman is reeled into yet another deadly mystery, and everyone at the lodge becomes a suspect. Cooperman's a detective with flair. Kinder and gentler than your average PI--and ironically squeamish about violence--he's the creation of author Howard Engel, a master of the crime genre whose enthusiastic fans include Ruth Rendell, Donald E. Westlake, Julian Symons, and Tony Hillerman. Engel's readership spans 13 countries, including Japan, England, Germany, Italy, Spain, Denmark, the United States, and his native Canada.

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